You're all fired!

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Just for show in my opinion. 

Cooks being replaced by robots i don´t see happening anytime so soon. 

Well atleast not this century.... 
 

kuan

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What kind of dishwasher is that?  Looks pretty convenient.
 
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COOL  .. but I'm holding out for a Star Trek style food replicator.


A replicator that could be programmed for the greatest culinary productions of the world's most famous chefs would be AWESOME ... though I refuse to eat torgud gagh (live serpent worms) or racht  which is a larger and more disgusting version of gagh.


There's also Hasperat which is a type of pepper that if incorrectly prepared will literally sear your mouth .. Ferengi slug steaks ... and Alfarian hair pasta which is made from the hair of a sheep like creature. 

Sound too strange to be true? And I'm not talking about the fictitious food of Star Trek. I'm thinking about the application of 3-D printing to food.


On a more serious note, unless there was prior programming, a robot chef would be unable to substitute ingredients for people with allergies or specific taste preferences. More to the point, a robot chef would lack the creative ability to improvise and to create culinary innovations. Unless we ever develop robots with artificial intelligence and the ability to taste food, technology will never be able to compete with humanity's creative spark.

Where would we have been if George Crum hadn't created the potato chip or if a Syrian concessionaire named Ernest A. Hamwi hadn't thought to adapt his production of zalabisa crispy waffle-like pastry to create a cone for ice cream at the 1904 St. Louis World' Fair? 

Without creative innovation, we would never had had developed ovens, refrigeration, canning, pasteurization, grinding or milling, or the use and process of fermentation, 

Still - that was a cool video. 
 
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Joined Jan 31, 2012
mm youve got me craving Pipius Claw and Heart of Targ now,
washed down with a bottle of Sluggo.

I agree it would be far more practical to just integrate all
ingredients and techniques into one machine internally,
rather than having a robot, or even robot arms, assembling
dishes in a manner that mimicks human movements.
A kind of Chef Machine of sorts.

3d printing from a 2d menu, pretty fascinating stuff!

However i do think full on replicators are a few
centuries off at least. Pity.
 
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Though, with the advent of technology,a lot of things have got really really changed. But, on the other hand, the development of artificial intelligence is also snatching jobs. But, a guy with a perfect specific knowledge can only be on the top of the world if he has an AI Certification.
 

phatch

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Though, with the advent of technology,a lot of things have got really really changed. But, on the other hand, the development of artificial intelligence is also snatching jobs. But, a guy with a perfect specific knowledge can only be on the top of the world if he has an AI Certification.
In the short term. Recursive self improvement is one of the goals of AI as well.
On a more serious note, unless there was prior programming, a robot chef would be unable to substitute ingredients for people with allergies or specific taste preferences. More to the point, a robot chef would lack the creative ability to improvise and to create culinary innovations. Unless we ever develop robots with artificial intelligence and the ability to taste food, technology will never be able to compete with humanity's creative spark.

Where would we have been if George Crum hadn't created the potato chip or if a Syrian concessionaire named Ernest A. Hamwi hadn't thought to adapt his production of zalabis, a crispy waffle-like pastry to create a cone for ice cream at the 1904 St. Louis World' Fair?

Without creative innovation, we would never had had developed ovens, refrigeration, canning, pasteurization, grinding or milling, or the use and process of fermentation,

Still - that was a cool video.
Maybe.

But these are basically all riffs on triggering fitness rewards. Our sensory input evolved to recognize fitness rewards that contributed to passing our genes along successfully. Much of cuisine and junk food is about triggering those reward responses without regard to the quality of the actual reward to our actual fitness. We have already quantized successful paths to triggers with every popular recipe. That's plenty of data to train an AI with. IBM Watson already does this to a degree supplying ideas to cook based on a set of input available ingredients.
 
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They use AI to scientifically "taste" beers and develop new recipes quickly. It's not far fetched they could do the same with food.
 
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Joined Jan 31, 2012
Of the people who said "tastes a bit off" "something strange in there" etc,
could be its because it was concocted by a computer......
or it could be because they KNEW it was concocted by a computer.

IMO, to be a valid experiment, theyd at least need a control group,
E.G., one who was told something like "these brand new recipes were created by a
renound Chef" etc. or tell the single group that one was AI the other a renound chef,
when theyre actually all AI created, see how they rate them.
Interesting though.
 

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