Your food philosophy, and how did it develop?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by mise, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. mise

    mise

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    22
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Molecular Gastronomy? Classic french? Regional Italian? Seasonal? Etc... I'm at a moment where I don't know what I want to cook. I'm about to make a move to a new restaurant, city, and possibly country in a career driven move. The problem is I have so many interests. Right now I work at a modern Japanese place, but I love modern French stuff. (think French Laundry and Eleven Madison Park) I've also taken a look into molecular gastronomy cooking, people like Grant Achatz at Alinea, Heston Blumenthal at The Fat Duck, and I can't decide with myself if this is something I want to do. I'd love to hear on how your culinary point of view developed. Should I try to limit myself to a certain style of cooking or perspective? 

    TL;DR: How did you develop your culinary point of view?
     
  2. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

    Messages:
    1,128
    Likes Received:
    101
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Well mines a toss up <_<

    I entered the industry loving asian cuisine , and was trained by a modern european chef who lived years in Italy and Spain. 

    So i kinda developed a Euro-Asian style, not that i mix both but i love both cooking styles. 

    Love using seasonal ingredients when ever possible , using bold flavors and great spices ( what ever i get on hand ) keep it as fresh as possible and if its homemade even better. 

    But now im usually cooking more Modern Italian and Spanish cuisine , i love rustic food , things that really look homie. 

    Basically i play to my strengths in the kitchen. Clean , bold flavors , well seasoned ,homie , and with alot of love. 

    But i have many tricks up my sleeves , so when i wanna be adventerous i can play that well too (obviously at my own time never in the kitchen)

    Gotta be diverse , cook what you love and learn what you dont. 

    Im a strong believer that no one will learn everything i have and nor i what you have. Everyone goes through different kitchens , experiences different flavors ,attempts different things , learns from different people , and thats what molds our culinary background. 

    Like no 2 fingerprints are identical , neither are 2 cooks and their culinary backgrounds. 
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
    scofield143 likes this.
  3. linecook854

    linecook854

    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    Head Chef
    I don't have complete control over a menu or ingredients at a sous level to fully develop my own style, I am also still learning and growing so I don't put a label on my cooking style. I will say it does lean French and Italian, this is where my palate and comprehension of cuisine is strongest. French technique and Italian theory is what one sous stressed to me and I think that makes a lot of sense to me.

    I love simple dishes with solid technique, good ingredients and executed at a high level, that is what really gets my juices flowing. I love Bouchon's philosophy, that is probably my favorite cookbook.
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    158
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Mise,

    Until you have your own place, cook what the Chef wants cooked!

    Feel free to explore, on your own time and your own place, to find your passion, but remember, the Chef is in charge!
     
     
  5. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

    Messages:
    1,128
    Likes Received:
    101
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Yeh , probably should have mentioned , i do alot of stuff on my own time. So dont go getting adventurous during work hours XD. 
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
  6. mise

    mise

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    22
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Of course, Chef. While the Chef is the boss, most of the places I worked, and want to work at, rely on more than the Exec, CDC, and Sous to write up menus. It is important to remember that the Chef is the boss, but I think it is also important for other cooks to flex creative muscle. For instance, we have a prep cook running a special this week. I like that kind of environment, one that you can develop your own point of view in action.
     
  7. vic cardenas

    vic cardenas

    Messages:
    453
    Likes Received:
    57
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Me? Peruvian food. 8 years ago I was a cook who had worked in mostly turn-and-burn joints. I had gotten a job in a French restaurant and that was my first fine dining experience. The French never really inspired me. I didn't learn a whole lot there and for me French food CAN be a little bland and too fatty. That same year I met my girlfriend, now wife, who is Peruvian. I traveled to Peru for the first time and many times thereafter. The food there just blew my mind. I had to learn all I could about their varied, innovative and vibrant cuisine. That's where I learned that fat does not = flavor, and that it's just a cheap trick and antiquated thinking. I've now become a very accomplished Peruvian chef and opened up a Peruvian food truck that was well received by local Peruvians, and gringos alike. The passion in me for traditional and modern Peruvian cuisine is very much alive after so many years and I'm glad to be on the forefront of an emerging dining trend.
     
  8. mise

    mise

    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    22
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    That's awesome man, any recommendation on Peruvian cook books? Always love to mess with new cuisines and flavors. 

    Edit: Now that I think about Astrid&Gaston is in Peru, they are making beautiful food over there.
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2013
  9. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    175
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Mine was and still is Produce the best you can, Use the best ingredients  , Quality first then cost, Customer comes first.  So far over 50 years this credo has served me well.
     
  10. vic cardenas

    vic cardenas

    Messages:
    453
    Likes Received:
    57
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Thanks! I bought a really nice one called "The Art of Peruvian Cuisine" by Tony Custer. It's a beautiful book. Check out the website (google it) for a few recipes...

    Coincidentally, I just lent it to another forum member, who's local. 

    Another great one I have, but might be hard to find here is "Secretos de Cocina". 


    Inspiration right here ^
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2013