Your favourite food/dish that you can't prepare yourself.

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by wyandotte, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Is there a dish/food that you absolutely love, but can't prepare yourself, or won't, because it is too much work for your level of skill?

    Mine is vegetable samosas.

    I've tried, but it takes a certain twist of the wrist, maybe it helps to be Asian Indian. So I buy them but wish I didn't have to.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2012
  2. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Sushi.  I've tried making a few rolls at home and it's not bad but it's not great either.  I've tried making the rice and forget about it, it's too hard to get the right texture and balance of sweetness and acidity so I end up picking up sushi rice from a local joint.  It takes way too much effort and after all that it's not as good as it is in the restaurant.  So I shell out the big $5 and pick up my beloved salmon avocado roll with spicy mayo from them.
     
  3. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    Firstly dishes utilising Nitrogen Liquid, such as Ferrán and Albert Adriá employ or Carme Ruscadella on the Iberian Peninsula in Barcelona.

    The next item would be a wood burning oven Pizza as we do not have a wood burning oven in our Urban City Loft.

    The 3rd would be Sashimi ... I would enjoy the mentoring and coaching for such an art.

    Ciao. Thanks for posting.

    Margaux Cintrano.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2012
  4. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Firstly dishes utilising Nitrogen Liquid, such as Ferrán and Albert Adriá employ or Carme Ruscadella on the Iberian Peninsula in Barcelona.

    Holy cow.  I have never even heard of such things, never mind being unable to prepare them. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif
     
  5. ordo

    ordo

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    A good Biryani. But I'm in the process, very close.
     
  6. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I absolutely love prime rib. I can cook it up just fine, and do it for customers whenever asked. However, just like most other everything that I cook, I don't want to cook it for myself to eat. 

    I do not know why. I am very proud of my abilities. For some crazy odd (stupid) reason that I have never figured out, I just don't like to cook for myself. 
     
  7. durangojo

    durangojo

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    welcome to the city jethro!!

    joey
     
  8. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Hey Joey, that should be "welcome to the city, Ellie May, or maybe Granny."   I be a girl.

    Iceman, maybe you were an aristocrat in a previous life (just saying; I don't know if there's such a thing) and cooking for yourself just didn't happen.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

    It rubbed me the wrong way when the Shah of Iran was blasting women for their/our inferiority, and one of his examples was that no woman has ever been a great cook, that "all great chefs have been men".  Is this true?  If so, I humbly apologize.  I would think that home cooking as done by a woman decade after decade has simply never been tested and observed in the way that restaurant dishes put out by "great male chefs" have  been.
     
  9. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    In reference to Molecular Gastronomy there is a book by this title, which I believe could explain in more detail, the intricate details about the usages of Nitrogen Liquid and how the chefs of XXI have employed it and recipes using it ...

    It is quite fascinating.

    Kind regards.

    Margaux. Cintrano.
     
  10. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    for me, I guess I would say a good Hawaiian plate, the kind that I would have at a family Luau (feast), not a commercial one ...

    Kalua pig (pork) made the traditional way, in the ground with lava rocks, Ti leaves, Banana leaves, the works;

    Poi (Taro root mashed to a thick paste consistency), I like mine a bit on the sour side with Hawaiian Sea Salt;

    Lomilomi Salmon (can't find the salt Salmon here in the desert);

    A'ama (black crab);

    O'pihi (kind'a like a small Abalone)

    ... I have to stop myself here before I start to cry ... my list of Hawaiian foods  could go on and on  

    some of these things I have found here, but not all ...
     
  11. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    I found the book on amazon, as follows:



    Just looking at the table of contents whets my appetite. 
     
  12. gunnar

    gunnar

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    sushi, East Indian and any Pan-Asian meal. I can make or fake most of them but it doesn't compare in my mind as going to my favorite restaurants and eating it there. Then again I also feel that the best sandwich (from PB and J to the most elaborate Dagwood) is the one made for you by someone else.

    On a side note did you guys know that cutting a sandwich on the diagonal increases flavor by a full 5% as opposed to a mere 2% increase in flavor if just cut in half?

    Another interesting note is that 72% of all statistics are made up on the spot.
     
  13. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    LOL....on the spot statistics, you haven't cahnged Gunnar, glad your back !
     
     
  14. butzy

    butzy

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    a good pate !

    I can make a decent chicken liver pate, but so far I haven't tried my hand on a nice pate de campagne, pepper pate, mushroom pate and the likes.

    Part of the reason is that I'm a bit scared to work with liver in the heat we normally have here. Maybe this winter?
     
  15. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    @ Wyandotte,

    I am pleased to see that your curiousity has you globetrotting a bit !

    I would recommend that you also read on line too, the Bio on Chef Ferrán Adriá who was the number one chef for a decade 2000 - 2010, chosen by the Judging Panel of London Restaurant Magazine in addition to having earned 3 Michelin Stars.

    He has a trilingual website including English: www.elbullifoundation.com

    There are some very famous chefs in the USA too, who are involved with Molecular Gastronomy, for example: Grant Achatz in Chicago, Nathan Myhrvold, Spanish Chef and Restaurateur José Andrés in D.C. and Los Angeles and Las Vegas, Wylie Dufresne in NYC and Heston Blumenthal in Bray, UK ... and note:  this movement is not that new ... Started back in the 1980s by Hervé and Harold Mc Gee and Adrià Brothers became known for their toying with it ...  

    Kind regards.

    Margaux Cintrano.
     
  16. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    Margcata, it's occurred to me that before the development of  "molecular gastronomy", traditional methods of food preparation were done correctly in order to ensure good taste and good absorption of nutrients.  They just knew.  They knew why kale & collards boiled for 15 minutes till it was somewhat grey-ish, then slightly cooked in a bit of fat, was so much more tasty + digestible than some modern "health foody" method, where all you do is cook it in a wee bit of water and eat it while it's still bright green.  Ugh.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/frown.gif

    It's a proved fact that the calcium in the kale isn't well assimilated with this latter style of cooking.  Yes, some nutrients are destroyed thru longer cooking, but one could say that they've just been transformed into a state of superior digestibility.  Reading further on this really appeals to me. Mind you,  one doesn't have to do 4-star gourmet cooking, you  just have to be familiar with basic, old techniques of our ancestors who, I dare way, were smarter than us in some ways.  We are just formalizing and supporting it through our style of science.
     
  17. Iceman

    Iceman

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    The Salad Dressing Ideas  thread just made me sit back and think a bit.  I actually do like the food that I've made/prepared/cooked or whatever. It seams though, that I don't like eating it right after I've done all the work producing it. Tonite we had all sorts of stuff that I had previously made. I enjoyed the bageebies out of all of it. It was all very good. I was happy eating it, and I'm very happy now saying so. It's so very simple that it's kinda goofy that I didn't think of it before, or maybe I always knew and just didn't think about it. Anyway, I like what I cook. 

    That molecular gastronomy idea is goofy. It's mumbo-jumbo voo-doo razz-ma-tazz for a few big-$$$ chefs to play with. It's not anything important for ordinary regular real culinary people to waste their time on. 

    LOL. Lets see what kinda fire-storm I'm starting w/ that last wise-crack. 
     
  18. chefmasterjohn

    chefmasterjohn

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    I've actually never tried to make my own sushi... What's the difficult part about it?
     
  19. wyandotte

    wyandotte

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    I think it is perfectly normal and to be expected that if you have just been immersed in the preparation of some dish, you are taking it in at some level - the sight, aroma, etc., which would explain why it's not imbued with the anticipation that comes up for food prepared previously. 

    As to your subject #2 - molecular gastronomy.  I haven't read the book yet but my understanding is that it is just an explanation of why things are done in a certain way.  Maybe I ought to go read it before I make any further comments, of course. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  20. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I was just making a wisecrack. For the most part, all I've ever seen of molecular gastronomy is that from four(4) restaurants, and TV shows. I've actually worked for three(3) big-name-hot-shot chefs that make a fortune doing it. It's really cool in places that cost you north of $200 just to sit down. I just don't think it's a reality for regular real people. Hey now, remember that's just/only my opinion, that I am always willing to share. YMMV.

    Molecular gastronomy  uses physical and chemical transformations of stuff when you cook it. It tries to add social, artistic and technical components of culinary and gastronomic phenomena in general. What that all means is: making foam to go w/ everything; using liquid nitrogen to freeze stuff; over-using sous-vide for everything; making stuff into flavored powders w/ maltodextrin; chemically using spherification to make stuff that looks like caviar; making flavored paper. In general, "Willy Wonka" stuff with food instead of just candy. Think of techno-compu-math/science geeks, that can't get any dates, in the kitchen

    [​IMG]

    NO, click here  >>>  http://store.molecularrecipes.com/molecular-gastronomy-kit/

    Molecular Gastronomy History

    Molecular Gastronomy Techniques

    Molecular Gastronomy at Harvard

    Molecular Gastronomy Chefs

    Coconut Foam with Fruit Salad and Ginger

    Chocolate Cremeux with Olive Oil and Salt

    Mozzarella Balloons Recipe

    Sea Garnish – edible sand, sea foam and seafood

    Melon Cantaloupe Caviar Recipe

    All-in-all ... it could be over-the-top super cool, and I'm just one of those "I can't/don't do it" big babies who is gonna say it sucks. That's just me. I spend my time worrying about good chx wings, meat-loaf, raviolis and lobster salad. Foolish me.