Your Favorite Cookbook

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by panini, Jul 22, 2011.

  1. panini

    panini

    Messages:
    5,185
    Likes Received:
    294
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Just wondering what your favorite cookbook is?

    Not necessarly the best, but the one that you browse frequantly.

    Mine is Amy Vanderbilt's Complete Cookbook  

    Panini
     
  2. thetincook

    thetincook

    Messages:
    1,103
    Likes Received:
    30
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Sauces by James Peterson

    Zuni Cafe by Judy Rogers

    Used to have Charlie Trotters Meat, Vegetable, etc series. Pure food pr0n.
     
  3. left4bread

    left4bread

    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    28
    Exp:
    mgmt
    Actually, Splendid Soups, by that James fellow.

    Read it front to back like a TPB novel.

    Joe Ortiz's The Village Baker was another for me.  Close second.
     
  4. panini

    panini

    Messages:
    5,185
    Likes Received:
    294
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Village Baker is a good book.

    Wondering if anyone owns the book I mentioned above and why I frequently pick it up to flip through?
     
  5. southerncross

    southerncross

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    My favorite is one I bought at a yard sale about 10 years ago for about 25 cents...  It's called "The Settlement Cookbook", it's dated from the mid 60's.  It has a ton of "old school" recipes, and everything I ever made out of it is amazing!  Apparently, it was given out to new customers at the Dime Savings Bank as a premium, at least that's what the inside label reads...Its my "go to" for most things....
     
  6. left4bread

    left4bread

    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    28
    Exp:
    mgmt

    Nope.  Remember that my mom had the etiquette book by her in the 70's.

    Because it's illustrated by Andy Warhol?  ha.  I dunno... why do you flip through it?

    Also, the initial question is too hard to narrow down.  Just thought of another one:

    Thailand:The Beautiful Cookbook   Bought it for the coffee table, turned out to have good recipes as well as cool pictures.
     
  7. panini

    panini

    Messages:
    5,185
    Likes Received:
    294
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Yea, I like it because Andrew Warhol did the drawings. He is my favorate artist. I was very fortunate to frequent a lot of the same places while I was

    going through my Bohemian/Rocker phase in coming up in NYC. I have quite a few Warhol pieces. I have a lot of the thinking sketches for the cookbook in 61.

       I also have a stach of older pastry books. You'd be surprized how many old cookbooks are for sale from auction houses and site dedicated to old books.

    And affordible compared to what you have to pay for current books.

    I just finished a great book by Paul Richards published in 1907. Hundreds of older recipes. The kicker was as I was coming to the end of the book

    The blank recipes in the back had all these letters of recomendations pasted in. He carried this book from the twenties when he was a camp cook

    for timber companies in Oregon, Phenix, to being the head of student feeding at UCLA in '33. His name is Frendsen. I'm going to try to research him.

    He had many hand written recipes from custard, spoonbread to blood sausage.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2011
  8. veronporter

    veronporter

    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    It really depends. For food porn/creative inspiration it's definitely "White Heat" by Marco Pierre White. Just a tad outdated but his style/philosophy really hit home for me. The simplicity/elegance of some of those dishes are truly inspiring. However, as a reference book I definitely find myself going back to "joy of cooking". That could be because I never went to culinary school and this was my first legit cookbook.

    Someone mentioned Charlie Trotters cookbooks, pretty great stuff as well.
     
  9. dean

    dean

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    10
    Stephaine Alexanders Cooks Companion an A to Z of ingerients the uses of each what they go with reciepes and ideas a book everyone should have
     
  10. left4bread

    left4bread

    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    28
    Exp:
    mgmt
    I used to be waayyyy to good of a cook to use that book, but at one point at a job I got in the weeds and realized it's worth.

    Got over myself and used a lot of recipes as a springboard to make legitimate food.

    I was cooking for college level kids who wanted "mom's" cooking and I had no idea how to make something simple like tuna casserole.  lol

    They have a great recipe for a cheesecake in there. Can't remember which one. (says to pull the chalaza out of the egg, props for that).

    I keep a copy handy.

    In lieu of "Becoming a Chef".  Seen some whack-"derriere" recipes in that one.
     
     
  11. left4bread

    left4bread

    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    28
    Exp:
    mgmt
    Really, at this point, I think that you're just trying to make me jealous.

    Good job!  It worked!

    Born 10 years too late and in the wrong city.  I blame my parents.
     
     
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    183
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Guide Culinaire by A Escoffier., Modern French Culinary Art by HP Pallapratt.
     
  13. andysky

    andysky Banned

    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    I usually read cookbook in Chinese. Do you like Chinese foods???/img/vbsmilies/smilies/confused.gif
     
  14. unintended boy

    unintended boy

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Sous Chef
    Love the guy, hate the guy, or think he's overrated...David Chang's Momofuku cookbook is pretty near and dear to me in terms of recent books. It gave me a little more insight as to why and how he comes up with the food for his restaurants. I also have an affinity for Ming Tsai's Blue Ginger cook book.
     
  15. temeculachef

    temeculachef

    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef

    The New Food Lover's Companion by Sharon Tyler Herbst  (Author), Ron Herbst  (Author)


    Also 

    The Flavor Bible by Karen Page  (Author), Andrew Dornenburg  (Author)


    If you have not had a chance to look at the Flavor Bible you need to check it out.  It is not so much of a cookbook as it is a book of telling you what goes well with what.  This book has helped me make many many of my menus.
     
  16. rgm2

    rgm2

    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    16
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    I second The Flavor Bible, though it is not a cookbook per se. Other than that I am loving Professional Cooking by Wayne Gisslen. It is also not a cookbook, however it is a textbook that has about 1200 large batch recipes that seem pretty solid. I am going through it chapter by chapter as if I was in a cooking school to help me decide if I want to go to culinary school next spring. Bot a bad investment at $40 on amazon. Be careful to get the $40 and not the $80 book that has some half-ass digit addon. 
     
    gourmetm likes this.