Your fav beef stew recipe?

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Joined Jan 8, 2010
I like gulyash (spelling?) and boeuf bourgignon.
Further more it really depends on your definition as I love a good curry!
But normally, it's some form of beef, bay leaves, onions, garlic and whatever else I got lying around ;)
 
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Stew is the "ULTIMATE" comfort food. It's the kind of meal to wipe the bowl clean with a piece of crusty bread. I don't use recipes so don't expect one. I do everything by smell, taste, feel, sight/appearance. I make it the way I want to eat it. I feel a good Chef will create a product or dish that fits his or hers design of what they feel it should look like and taste like. Break down what you like, don't use someone else's ideas. Make the dish an open canvas of your ideas.......This is mine... E2FD60A6-D5FC-4E5C-B40E-4BDDE8120524.jpeg
 
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I often use fennel bulb in place of or in addition to the onion, and some dried tart cherries add a nice flavor.

And Seoul Food's post reminded me of an evening some time ago. My friend would host achile party at his place the Saturday before the Superbowl. One year I took three dishes - a chicken, mushroom habanero, a black bean and lamb, and the third one nobody ate any of it, but it was the most photographed of the night. It was a can of the cheapest 'chili con carne' I could find at the store, set on a coffee mug warming plate, with a plastic serving spoon stuck in it. I thought for sure I had a picture of it somewhere.

mjb.
 
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Joined Jul 15, 2020
Either Thomas Keller's Pot-au-Feu recipe from the origin French Laundry Cookbook or Paula Wolfert's Braised Short Ribs in Porcini-Prune Sauce from The Cooking of Southwest France.

The former is just so perfectly refined with such finesse and technique while the latter is just delightful rich and the prunes and porcinis give the classic braised short ribs such a unique twist. One of these days I want to try and do a re-interpretation of Wolfert's recipe using Keller's techniques of refinement.
 
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I make a variant of Beef Carbonnade. I like to use the following substitutions:
  • Crabby Apple Wine from Threefold Vine in place of apple cider vinegar
  • Ore Dock Blonde Ale in place of the Belgian Abby ale
  • Real maple syrup in place of the brown sugar
This gives it a slight twist and I get to support local businesses.
 
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Joined Sep 21, 2010
I make a variant of Beef Carbonnade. I like to use the following substitutions:
  • Crabby Apple Wine from Threefold Vine in place of apple cider vinegar
  • Ore Dock Blonde Ale in place of the Belgian Abby ale
  • Real maple syrup in place of the brown sugar
This gives it a slight twist and I get to support local businesses.
I've used similar ingredients with pork, but never with beef. I might give it a try!
 
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