Your 2006 Vegetable Garden

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mudbug, Mar 31, 2006.

  1. mudbug

    mudbug

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    It's that time of year!

    What will you be growing in your garden?
    Trying anything new?
    Are you starting from seeds or starting with plants?
    What are your year to year favorites?
    Anything you're particularly looking forward to?
    Anything you'd like help with?
     
  2. chrose

    chrose

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    After last year I had decided to cut back the size of my garden and grow fewer veggies. But as soon as it started to warm up I changed my mind somewhat. I'm still a little iffy about what to grow this year, but I will be on my second year of the Alaska Bountea treatment and I am also using John Jeavons Bio Intensive techniques. Over the course of time I hope to have soil that's alive and can grow the type of quality plants that my friend John Evans, and John Jeavon can grow.
    So this year along with the usual Thyme, Rosemary, Oregano I am going to go with Goliath and Roma tomatoes, Jalapenos, Salsa, Poblano and Goliath Bell peppers. Japanese Eggplant, Beets, Onions, a giant sunflower, some Lettuce and perhaps some Sweet potatoes and a pumpkin. I will of course document my progress and track it from last year.
    Oh yeah, I will also be planting a Blue Spruce in honor of my father, a couple of Dwarf fruit trees, and I hope to make a wet garden to grow some Wasabi roots!
     
  3. phoebe

    phoebe

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    I have several flats of tomatoes and peppers started from seeds, but am having problems. After the first set of true leaves they all just stopped growing :eek: . I think it was the shock of some sudden unusually cold weather. Then, just when the weather was calming down and I'd fed everyone a dilute solution of fertilizer, the winds came and knocked down one of the flats, destroying all the plants in it :eek: :eek: :cry: . Right now the rest of them are cowering under an overhang until the latest rainstorm passes. Sigh.
    Still have some carrots in the ground and nothing seems to kill my huge rosemary plant. In a few weeks I'll start some basil and restart some Italien Parsley and bolt-resistent lettuces. Fingers crossed!
     
  4. porkchops

    porkchops

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    Last year was my first year with a plot in our community garden. Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that people were swiping my produce... Herbs and lettuces did well, but the tomatoes & peppers walked.

    This year my husband and I are buying a house. We'll know for sure if it's a "go" tomorrow night. In anticipation, I bought the following seeds from rareseeds.com:

    Amish Deer Tongue lettuce
    Brandywine Tomatoes
    Albino Bullnose Sweet Peppers
    A Euro Mesclun blend
    New Zealand Spinach
    Chinese 5 color Hot peppers
    Ancho San Luis Peppers
    Harlequin Marigolds (to keep the pests away.. I hope)
    Cherokee Purple Tomatoes
    Broad Leaf Sage
    Giant of Italy Parsley
    Genovese Basil

    If buying the house falls apart.. I will try to plant these in the community garden.. I sure hope that I have a private place to do this.. then I'll take a stab at composting, etc.. If the veggies do well, I'd like to be able to eat them myself.. and not donate them to the guys who hang out in there with cases of beer.

    I think I'm starting this planting stuff a little late... seeds are still in packets.. but this house buying stuff is stressful, and I haven't been able to bring myself to set aside the time.

    (fingers crossed)

    P
     
  5. diane

    diane

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    New Zealand spinach? Would that be silverbeet? If so you will find it an absolute doddle. My kids had one plant each they picked from when they were kids, we used to go outside and pick dinner, they each had a little basket. For their Own Pot. It was a lot of fun.
     
  6. marzoli

    marzoli

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    What is a doddle?
    Pardon my asking, but I lecture my students all the time about asking questions when they don't know what something means, so . . . what's a doddle? :D
     
  7. chrose

    chrose

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    From "everything2.com": And considering that Diane appears to be from New Zealand, I suspect this it true.
     
  8. porkchops

    porkchops

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    I'm not sure if it's silverbeet. The packet's at home. The seeds are huge, though. So far the deer tongue and the mesclun are the only things that have germinated (it's only been 4 days).

    I'm a little worried, though. Some of the seeds look a little fuzzy. I'm using peat plugs, and I'm worried that I overwatered them and it's mold.. but I heard that overwatering plugs is hard to do.

    House closing is tentatively set for May 26th! hopefully everything goes into the ground that weekend! I want to do that before we even move in any furniture.
     
  9. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Porkchops,

    Avoid using peat pots, especially if they're made out of synthetic materials. Your problem is not uncommon and if they do sprout, the roots often do not leave the environment of the peat pot when planted in soil which is not healthy for the plant. At the same time, be patient. Unless your soil temperature is at 80-85 degrees, germination may take longer...
     
  10. crazytatt

    crazytatt

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    I will be growing some of my "staples" some from seed, some from clones preserved through the off season...

    Japenesse Egplant, seeded
    PattyPans', seeded
    Tiger Squash, seeded
    Hierloom 'Maters( thanks be to mom)
    Golden Boy tomatoes, looking forward big time to em'
    Strawberries, residiual
    I'm hoping to see results from a Kiwi plant that is almost 5yrs old now. Last season it threw little "buds" that looked like kiwis, but no bigger then a marble, and were REALLY bitter. I will say that it has vined all over everything like a monster.

    My firsts, and I hope the results/yield will be wort it:
    Edible Orchids, brought up from my boy in FLA.(from clippings)
    And I am going to try some potatoes, blues, and sweets, both from clippings.
     
  11. porkchops

    porkchops

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    This is my first time using the peat plugs.. it was at someone's suggestion at work. I won't do it again, now that I know, but I'm hoping that I can get through this season with them.... since they're already planted and all.

    If nothing happens within about a week, I may go plant some additional seeds in soil. Unfortunately, I've got very little space to put anything, let alone a whole pallet of seedlings until we move.

    I read online that some hot pepper seeds can take a month to germinate. I wonder how long I should give everything.. before I try soil.
     
  12. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Porkchops,

    If your soil temperature is between 80-85 degrees, well over 90% of your seeds of all varieties should germinate within a week. If you did not score the bottom of the peat pots, you might consider doing so. This way the roots won't get trapped.

    If you're in doubt about germination, go ahead and sow some extra seeds in the dirt now. The worst that can happen is you have some extra plants. If you end up with extra, you can always kill the weaker ones, leave them in and compare which do better (the peat or direct sown), or give some away.
     
  13. porkchops

    porkchops

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    Thanks Mudbug!

    I'm not sure what the temp is in the soil. I do have them under a 60 watt grow light during the day, which I think generates some heat. At night, I turn the light off. I wonder if I should keep the light on 24 hrs a day to keep it more toasty. Any opinion?

    Thx!

    P
     
  14. mudbug

    mudbug

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    If you're growing them inside, then your soil temp is probably the same temperature as the room. The light will provide a bit of heat, but not enough to get the soil to 85 degrees. If you really want to, you can go so far as to get a Seedling Heat Mat.

    I don't know where you are, what you're trying to plant, or what your outside temps are, but you can always sow seed in a seed tray that has a clear cover. This creates a mini greenhouse effect and if outside, can warm up nicely in the sun.
     
  15. porkchops

    porkchops

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    I live in Hoboken, NJ. Someone told me that the last frost date is the 2nd week in May.

    I think you're right about it not being hot enough. I decided that there was a draft blowing onto the three trays that I have, so I've tried to remedy that. I do have them covered with a clear plastic top, so I hope that's helping to keep it toasty, although I try to let them air out a little bit each day. I read somewhere online that doing that might help reduce the chances of developing mold.

    I'm going out of town for the rest of the weekend, so I don't anticipate having time to plant in soil trays for a week or so, but I'm hoping that I've helped to up the temperature a little bit.

    Thanks again for all of the advice.

    P
     
  16. porkchops

    porkchops

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    Not that you all need a play-by-play.. but I'm very excited. Keeping a grow light on 24 hrs a day has helped keep my seedtrays warm enough so that things are starting to grow.

    Seedlings that are making an appearance:
    Ancho Chilis (as of last night... yay!)
    Albino Peppers
    Brandywine Tomatoes
    Genovese Basil
    Deer tongue Lettuce
    Mesclun Blend

    Still waiting on:
    Chinese 5 color Hot Peppers
    Sage
    Parsley
    Purple Cherokee Tomatoes
    New Zealand Spinach

    I've read that the latters can be slow to germinate... so I'm trying to be patient. I'm watering everything with a spray bottle, to hopefully prevent overwatering.
     
  17. phoebe

    phoebe

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    Congratulations! :bounce: It really is exciting when they start to come up.

    One caution though. Seedlings as well as mature plants need some down-time, so you don't need to keep them in the light all the time. In fact, it's not a good idea at all. At most, 16 hours a day of light for sprouted seedlings is more than enough. Some folks put their lights on timers so they don't have to think about it.
     
  18. diane

    diane

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    I fear I may have misled you Porkchop. What is now Pork and Puha, was once Pakeha and Puha. aka NZ spinach. Pakeha was also known as long white pig, but canabalism has fled our shores, albeit not until fairly well into 20th century. Maoris didn't like us much anyway, said we were to salty. Silverbeet may be what you call chard. We use only the inner tender leaves, and the plant keeps growing. They make delightful roll ups, just blanched and filled, maybe baked in a modicom of stock appropriate to the filling chosen. Do not waste that stock if there is any left, it is a great addition to the gravy, like pea water. Or soup. Great plain,steamed with s&P, or chopped cooked and sour cream and and nutmeg added. Makes a great liner for savory pies flans quiches. I am sure it is a plant you would enjoy, if you can find it. You would need about 6 to twelve, depending on your family size or need, to keep you in those loverly inner leaves.
     
  19. cloudybutnice

    cloudybutnice

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    Tomatoes, peas, broad beans, carrots, radish, sweetcorn all from seed.
    Onions and shallots from sets.
    I leave garlic in all the year round and spring onions.
    Also strawberries, rhubarb ,asparagus. raspberries, blackcurrants and apples.
     
  20. porkchops

    porkchops

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    Ok.. We closed on the house (yay), and I've been poking around. We've got a bunch of strawberries that are starting to ripen, and rhubarb. The rhubarb stalks are already pink. I'm not totally sure, but I'm thinking that it's close to harvesting.. but I really don't know much abour rhubarb. Should I wait for the strawberries and pick both, and go for making a pie?

    Oh, and the seller's idea of composting is to throw whole pieces of fruit or vegetables to rot in the garden. It sort of gives me the willies, but I'm going to till it all, chop up all that's there, and start a compost bin tomorrow. So far in the produce graveyard (aka raised planter) I see potatoes, grapefruit and squash... hanging out amongst the ripening fruit.

    It's going to be a long day tomorrow....

    P