Yorkshire Puddings

203
14
Joined Jan 23, 2010
i am from Yorkshire, England, where our traditional Sunday lunch roast beef dinner isn't complete without a Yorkshire pudding, and this goes for the whole of the country too.

Since this is an international forum i am wondering how well Yorkshire puddings are known in other countries.

the recipe is simple, equal quantities of:

milk
water
eggs
plain flour

and a pinch of salt, all whisked together, baked in pudding tins at a high temp of 200deg celcius for 10-15 mins.

i make Yorkshire puddings with fresh grated horseradish and fresh chopped parsley as additional ingredients, there is nothing better to go with a roast beef dinner /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif


 
 
4,259
667
Joined Nov 5, 2007
I love them myself.  Lately I've been doing them as one big pie rather than in individual tins.  Just a bit easier, though next time I think I'll go the individual route - more cripsy crust that way. Here's a pic of a seared ribeye dinner from a while back:

 
203
14
Joined Jan 23, 2010
I love them myself.  Lately I've been doing them as one big pie rather than in individual tins.  Just a bit easier, though next time I think I'll go the individual route - more cripsy crust that way. Here's a pic of a seared ribeye dinner from a while back:

ah .. toad in the hole /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

dish looks like beef and potato with sauce and apsaragus, mushrooms, roquette, lollo rosso, baby sweet corn, tomatoes, and what is that stuff that looks like vermicelli noodles or beansprouts and the other white stuff is it cheese?
 
Last edited:
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Joined Feb 3, 2010
That looks really yummy, teamfat /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif

A couple of weeks ago I spent my spare time over a couple of days attempting to make yorkshire puddings.  I was thinking of offering them as part of lunch special, but I clearly need more practice first.  In the same pan I would have some glowing success and some puckish failures.  I would have practiced more, as it was very yummy practice, but I will not intentionally waste food so when everyone was stuffed (and then some) I had to stop.

I seem to be having trouble figuring out how much drippings to put in.  I made em in a muffin pan, and got the pan and drippings smoking hot before quickly adding the chilled batter and popping them back into the hot oven.

Basically, here in southern Ontario, Canada, we are very *drool* aware of yorkshire puddings and some of us can actually make them!  lol
 
88
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Joined Jun 5, 2009
I've made Yorkshire pudding both in the pan and in popover forms.  I think I prefer the popover mode because there is more of the crispy crust and they don't seem to deflate as badly as the pan version.  Either way, its always a hit around here.
 
3,401
161
Joined Sep 18, 2008
"...the recipe is simple, equal quantities of:

milk
water
eggs
plain flour

and a pinch of salt, all whisked together, baked in pudding tins at a high temp of 200deg celcius for 10-15 mins."

Is that "equal quantities" by weight or by volume?
 
36
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Joined Feb 24, 2010
Yorkshire puddings are always one of my favorite food memories... My mom would make them on rare occasion, and they were always delicious, and VERY more-ish!

I think I'm going to have to try this... Your thread is very inspiring!
 
203
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Joined Jan 23, 2010
Is that "equal quantities" by weight or by volume?
equal quantities by volume.

i measure a pint glass full of each ingredient and get about 24 small Yorkshire puddings out of the mixture.

i use hot beef dripping enough to coat the bottom of the pudding tins which i heat in the oven first before adding the hot fat and mixture, it also helps if you leave the mixture to rest in the fridge for a couple of hours or ideally overnight, and once baking them in the oven avoid unnecessarily opening the oven door /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
 
163
10
Joined Nov 1, 2009
I love a traditional roast beef and Yorkshire pudding.

i am from Yorkshire, England, where our traditional Sunday lunch roast beef dinner isn't complete without a Yorkshire pudding, and this goes for the whole of the country too.

Since this is an international forum i am wondering how well Yorkshire puddings are known in other countries.

the recipe is simple, equal quantities of:

milk
water
eggs
plain flour

and a pinch of salt, all whisked together, baked in pudding tins at a high temp of 200deg celcius for 10-15 mins.

i make Yorkshire puddings with fresh grated horseradish and fresh chopped parsley as additional ingredients, there is nothing better to go with a roast beef dinner /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif


 
 
 
3,355
44
Joined May 29, 2006
I thik all of us use just about the same ratios. I save fat from bacon mixed with canola oil , put it in cupcake pans , get it real hot then pour batter in. I add a drop of yellow food color for eye appeal and a drop of sugar as this carmelizes and also gives a great color..When I plate the Prime rib i let the yorkshire soak in a bain marie of Au Jus a few secons, serve on the side in a monkey dish with Au Jus. and horseradish creme on the side.
 
203
14
Joined Jan 23, 2010
another recipe i used when making batches of pig batter was:

2 trays of eggs
4 small bowls of plain flour - piled up full
4 pints of whole milk
2 pints of water
salt

left to rest overnight - made the best Yorkshire puddings i have ever seen
 
2,753
16
Joined Feb 26, 2007
Have only ever had them once - so I won't even attempt to post a recipe.  Had them in a country pub in the UK long long ago. They aren't seen much here.

They were individual ones with a traditional roast lamb, and the Yorkies were filled with a beautiful gravy/sauce. So very very nice.

I have heard tell a splash of white vinegar in the batter helps too.  Anyone else heard of this?
 
704
21
Joined Apr 17, 2006
I had a freind who used to make what she called "English" pudding that she would serve with roast beef. She learned it from her mother who was French/Nez Perce Indian from Canada. I don't remember how she made it other than it had ground suet, flour, water and salt. Maybe something else, but I don't remember. Didn't sound like it would taste like anything, but it was good. I made it once, years ago, and as I recall it was like a quick bread batter that was baked in a loaf pan. It was sliced and served next to the beef with gravy. It reminded me of a stiff dumpling for texture. I was under the (mistaken) impression for years that this was Yorkshire pudding. Is anyone familiar with this side dish?
 
3,355
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Joined May 29, 2006
Hey Grey  The USA  "popover'' and yorkshire pudding are same thing.&same recipe.They used to be passed around hot in our better steakhouses many years ago, usually from a basket by an attractive young lady.
 
203
14
Joined Jan 23, 2010
i have just recalled the best mixing method i have used when making Yorkshire puddings, taught to me by a previous head chef i used to work with:

in an electric mixer first whisk the eggs together until the yolks and whites are thoroughly mixed, then on a slow speed gradually add the flour and mix in well, again on a slow speed slowly add the milk and then the water and salt and mix well for up to 5mins or until all the lumps have gone, strain if necessary and leave to rest in a fridge uncovered overnight.

the best Yorkshire puddings i have seen were made by this method /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
 
704
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Joined Apr 17, 2006
Yeah Ed, I'm old enough to have worked in a place that had popovers. They had a peson that did nothing but bake popovers all night (not me, thankfully). Seemed a touchy process from what I obsevered. The pan had to be hot, the oil in the cups a certain temp. and the person doing it seemed to yell "ouch" a lot as I think they got burned a lot.
 
3,355
44
Joined May 29, 2006
Thats right. I worked in one place where they set the whole oven on fire when making popovers. The kids did not know that when you pouredin batter the oil rises. It went on lower deck of oven and ignited. Stove and oven totaly junked. fire dept took it into the rear yard. Oh well another day in the business. It is never boring!
 

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