yoghurt failure

2,362
945
Joined Jan 8, 2010
I've made yoghurt on a regular base, but suddenly I had a batch that didn't set.
As far as I know, I've done everything the same as before.
What could have gone wrong?

Procedure
- i bought 5 litre milk straight from the cow
- heated to 80 oC
- cooled down to 40-42 oC
- added left over commercial yoghurt (room temperature) and stirred it in
- put pot in cool box to keep warm
- moved pot to fridge
- when time came to ladle it out to a container with lid (discarding some of the "whey"), it was all liquid.....
????
 
180
41
Joined Dec 29, 2019
I've made yoghurt on a regular base, but suddenly I had a batch that didn't set.
As far as I know, I've done everything the same as before.
What could have gone wrong?

Procedure
- i bought 5 litre milk straight from the cow
- heated to 80 oC
- cooled down to 40-42 oC
- added left over commercial yoghurt (room temperature) and stirred it in
- put pot in cool box to keep warm
- moved pot to fridge
- when time came to ladle it out to a container with lid (discarding some of the "whey"), it was all liquid.....
????
could be sterilization problem, It happens.
I ruined a batch stirring in the seed with my bare hand, 4 gallons ruined.
" left over commercial yoghurt" sounds like another possible source of problem.

I wrap mine in an electric blanket covered with a comforter to maintain temps.
Monitor the temp occasionally.
don't chill it unless it jelled.

I'd try it again with fresh yogurt, innoculate at 45c.
Use an infra red temp gun, the less tools touch it the better.
If it still fails use the milk for baking, it makes good scones and bread.
 
2,362
945
Joined Jan 8, 2010
Thanks
I've used that type of yoghurt before as a starter. But who knows....
I'll use my IR thermometer next time ans check before moving the whole concoction to the fridge.
I was thinking it might have been the milk as it looked much thinner and less creamy than usual.

I'm using the milk for baking and luckily my dogs like it too ;)
 
180
41
Joined Dec 29, 2019
Thanks
I've used that type of yoghurt before as a starter. But who knows....
I'll use my IR thermometer next time ans check before moving the whole concoction to the fridge.
I was thinking it might have been the milk as it looked much thinner and less creamy than usual.

I'm using the milk for baking and luckily my dogs like it too ;)
theres nothing wrong with commercial starter, the problem is the "leftover' part , I prefer to open a new sealed tub. I tried with raw milk from the local Amish farmer, it was the same as retail milk.
I kept going and made cream cheese, then cheesecake from that.
 
2,362
945
Joined Jan 8, 2010
I'm actually just realising that you may have an excellent point!
Normally, I eat part of a tub of commercial yoghurt, leave some, and order milk. This time the milk wasn't there the following day, but only close to a week later (due to increased demand and less milk since all vegetation dried up).
Guess I was too focused on milk quality and totally forgetting about the age of the yoghurt starter!
 
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