Yelp and the professional Chef

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chefross, Dec 13, 2016.

  1. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    Yeah, I can't stand that. There are subtle techniques waitstaff use to be vindictive. Disappearing because you weren't ready to order when it was convenient for them is one. Happens a lot, in my experience. Ignoring you when they forgot to fill your water or bring more bread etc, etc. Funny thing is, most think they can fake it by looking busy. I know when you are ignoring me. Apparently the size of your tip is irrelevant to you. Sometimes I purposely forget to ask for a condiment or such, and make them come back four times when one trip would do. 

    Another thing they do that is annoying is they come over exactly when you placed a forkful of food in your mouth and ask "how is everything?" It's like your dentist asking you questions while his hands are in your mouth. They don't really want a response. . .  

    And I never use Yelp to select restaurants. Judging food and the experience is very subjective, for one. And it's already known that the reviews are manipulated and many are created by owners. 
     
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I only see buttons for "useful", "cool", and "funny".
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Maybe one needs to be logged on to see it, but to the right of the voting bottoms is a gray "report review" button that allows reporting based on 8 possible violations.

    But it might not be on the mobile app. I saw it on the full version.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2016
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    I can understand this now after reading others posts.

    Actually I was in a different city and downloaded the app to my IPhone for the very purpose of finding a place to eat.

    I had heard the YELP was the app to use.

    Yes food is, and always will be subjective.

    That's why even the Michelin system isn't always a great gauge either
     
  5. scott livesey

    scott livesey

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         I am not a chef, but all my jobs in 45 years of work involved a good deal of customer service.  good or bad service is a roll of the dice, doesn't seem to matter what the price per person is.  the fast food place that only serves chicken and is closed on Sunday in this area has good service.  Most smaller, independent ethnic restaurants have good service, especially where a lot of the workers are members of the same family.  

    I remember being in Cannes, France and basically getting the bums rush in a "French" restaurant especially after they found out I could not speak French and was American military.  the next day, found a small Chinese restaurant on the same street where I was treated like a long lost cousin.

         I use Yelp on occasion, but sometimes a restaurant may have ten reviews, 5 5 star and 5 1 star, a ton of help.  I am a slow eater and hate it when dishes are cleared before everyone is finished, whether in a restaurant or a friend's home.  

         sometimes we won't order our entrees until appetizers are almost gone.

    scott
     
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  6. cookie1801

    cookie1801

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    Sorry you had a bad dining experience. I would never relate it to the weather, as a good restaurant should be prepared for that. I do use Yelp, but I use Urban Spoon, Zagat, and the restaurant's website before I spend a penny in a fine dining establishment. I have had the opportunity to experience so-called Haute Cuisine, but it is only as memorable as the Owner/Executive chef plans it. In other words, service and timing have to be as exemplary as the food.
     
  7. smokeydoke

    smokeydoke

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    Yelp. Yuck. Yelpers. Yuckier. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/frown.gif
     
  8. chefross

    chefross

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  9. Jain Daugh

    Jain Daugh

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    I have mixed feelings about Yelp. I do to use it to find restaurants in places that I have never been to before and it does help to let me know what types of foods/menus are available. What I have come to temper Yelp reviews with is knowing that these can be weighted on the 'younger' side as many younger people are more social media oriented and willing to post. I am more impressed with a place that adds it menu to its listing so that I can have an idea about what can be enjoyed there - or not.

    Re service, a good server seems to have become all too rare these days. A pet peeve of mine is a server that doesn't check back with me after I have had a chance to TASTE the food. Checking back after I have eaten most of my order is meaningless really. But I will add that I have had the great pleasure of having been served by a few people who were ACE at serving! I hold those people dear in my mind though sadly their wonderful practices only add contrast to the poor service that seems to be happening more lately. Why hasn't anyone started a wait person training 'school'?!? ;)
     
  10. foodpump

    foodpump

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    A training school for servers?
    You don't understand. I NEED to earn x$ for my 3rd year of university/college. This job is mine, I deserve it because...well never mind, and I'm not spending any money or time on a stupid servers training school when I'll be going back to a real school in a few months anyway.


    On the other hand, in most European countries a server takes a two year apprenticeship......
     
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  11. Jain Daugh

    Jain Daugh

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    I don't see how having a 'training' program prevents any freelancing by those who want to just 'have a job'. But it would seem a no-brainer for a restaurant manager to choose between some one who has learned HOW to do that job and some one who just 'needs' the job ;). But hey! if university is such a good idea, why not being 'schooled' in ANY job?!?
    (I do get your statement reflecting a mentality that prevails)
     
  12. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    The best service is service you don't really notice. Where you don'y have to ask for anything, it just appears. A dropped utensil, magically replaced. Water glass, always replenished. Etc. A good server will know by watching his guests, if the food is meeting or exceeding expectations without having to interrupt their experience. I ran a school for waiters, ...classes started the day you were hired and not only was there no tuition...you were paid to attend!
     
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  13. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Jain,

    You're on the right track, but some refinements are needed.

    If an employer doesn't demand a, say, Bach. of business admin, the desire to get such a qualification for a potential employee is pretty low.

    Obviously it would make sense to have a "category 1" qualification for servers, with all the important knowledge about serving tested on the students. A "category 2" qualification that builds on 1, with alcohol and wine knowledge would make even more sense. If such qualifications existed, the employer could demand employees have them, and accordingly, a salary based on qualifications and experience could be established- which would pretty much do away with the current system of minimum wage or tipping wages and 15 to20% of the entire dining experience in tips-- which is not fair to the other employees who work hard for the entire dining experience.

    Most European countries have these qualifications, but the U.S. doesn't even have a recognized qualification for cooks, let alone servers.
     
  14. chefross

    chefross

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    It is sad that serving knowledge is attained by following around another server for a few weeks learning all the wrong habits before allowing said server out on their own.
     
  15. QuailMaster

    QuailMaster

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    On using Yelp, I have found it most useful to check other reviews by both negative and positive reviewers. When my son graduated from the Air Force bootcamp in San Antonio, TX, the wife and I did a tour of BBQ joints based solely on a handful of young ladies' negative reviews. These ladies hated any place that served on butcher paper, in baskets, and so on. I read their other reviews and got an idea of what they liked and hated and found the best BBQ in places they hated. We didn't have a single bad meal, thanks to them.
     
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