Yay, vegetarian cooking (Can you sense the sarcasm?)

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I’m a sous chef at an upscale independent living facility (rich elderly people who love their prime rib and crab cakes). We’re a corporation and I’ve been asked to cook for the vice president of the whole who’s going to be there next week. She’s an adventurous eater but unfortunately, she’s a vegetarian, lacto/ovo; not my most experience suit. Any ideas on something with a little bit of wow to it. It’s a three course meal and I’ve already figured out my starter and dessert. Entrée where I’m kind of being snagged. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 
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Some additional parameters would be nice. Don't want to have a cuisine clash or anything. It also depends on what the purpose of the meal is. I.e. Is it just for kicks or tasting for menu development. I always have issues because there is no obvious 'center of the plate' for veggies.

Lots of things you can do in the South Asian milieu. Protein comes from the lentils (whole beans, split and hulled, or flours) or dairy (yogurt, panir cheese (kinda like a pressed ricotta), and sometimes buttermilk).

East Asian has a lot of meat substitutes. Setain and Tempeh have great texture. Wheat gluten too. There is the tofu family as well.
 
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Its a just for kicks thing. Its the whole deal of, "Hey, one of the heads of you company is coming, roll out the carpet." Last year our food was also voted best in the corporation so I also have that to live up to. The only parameter they really gave me was vegetarian and they said she wasn't the hugest fan of tofu. Probably should have mentioned that part. From what I've heard, her view is like mine which is: Vegetarian food can be good when they aren't just trying to make it taste like meat. i.e. let the broccoli taste like broccoli, don't try and make it taste like a steak. The dessert is supposed to be some kind of chocolate cake because she's a chocolate fiend. The soup/salad I'm still holding out on until I figure out my entree. Its easier for me to plan my starter in this case based on me entree. They styles I'm most comfortable in are French, American, and Chinese if that helps.
 
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I like cooking and eating vegetarian dishes. Vegetarian cuisine is nice. 
 
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Maybe a neopolitian of friedd eggplant and squash on a cream of dahl base?
 
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Grilled Vegetable Sachets: grilled Corn, oven roasted Cauliflower, grilled Jicama, Red Bell Peppers, and Spinach seasoned with toasted Cardamom, Fenugreek, and Cumin, sealed up in an Egg Wrapper, grilled, with a grilled Sweet Corn Sauce

Farmers Market Tomatoes: local vine ripened Tomatoes stuffed with Spinach, Napa Cabbage, Kolhrabi, Tofu, and toasted Walnuts Cabbage, then baked and topped with a Green Grape Garlic Sauce

Moroccan Inspired Couscous Lasagna: Zucchini, Cauliflower, Eggplant, and Tomatoes simmered in Charmoula and layered with Preserved Lemon Couscous and Fontina Cheese in the manner of Lasagna and baked in a hot oven, then topped with a Cumin scented Tomato Sauce

Thai Coconut Ratatouille: Japanese Eggplant, Roma Tomatoes, Green Cabbage, and Bananas simmered in Coconut, Lemongrass, and Ginger Broth, served in Green Tea Crepes
 
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Vietnamese Summer Rolls

Rice paper wrappers with what ever good veggies you got (can be raw, marinated, or even cooked briefly). Dipping sauce is lime juice, sugar, thai or serrano chili, garlic. A hoison peanut sauce is also traditional, but I can't recall how to make that off hand.

Good protien components for the rolls would be marinated then grilled or seared seitan or tempeh slices.
 
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My suggestion is "fragrant yellow rice" with "Coconut Srundeng" or "tempe dry orek" top up with pepes tahu(steam tofu with herb, etc) or just simply Pilaf rice(replace the butter with olive oil .."maybe" to sweat the onion) with sweet and sour tofu.

This is just my suggestion. I don't know if there is any good.

Good luck chef.
 
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Very nice suggestion chef69. Nice entry post to ChefTalk. However, just a thought here, the last post before yours was April 18, 2011, over three(3) years ago. LOL. Don't worry though, you are not at all the first poster to reply to a really old thread question. I've done it numerous times.
 
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Thank u chef Iceman. oh gosh I didn't realize it happened in 2011. I just joined this forum this year n didn't read properly.

Chef Iceman....may I ask you some questions about how to make the correct garlic confit, aioli, guacomole, and vege salsa? hmm....some people make different recipe to another, but I still believe there is an exact method how to do it.

Thank you so much chef.

chef 69
 
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Hello....I am new here.

When I saw yr reply to sous chef above....it was really "wow". May I know how did u learn this well? I have the difficulty in understanding western food.

Thank you.

Chef69
 
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Grilled Vegetable Sachets: grilled Corn, oven roasted Cauliflower, grilled Jicama, Red Bell Peppers, and Spinach seasoned with toasted Cardamom, Fenugreek, and Cumin, sealed up in an Egg Wrapper, grilled, with a grilled Sweet Corn Sauce

Farmers Market Tomatoes: local vine ripened Tomatoes stuffed with Spinach, Napa Cabbage, Kolhrabi, Tofu, and toasted Walnuts Cabbage, then baked and topped with a Green Grape Garlic Sauce

Moroccan Inspired Couscous Lasagna: Zucchini, Cauliflower, Eggplant, and Tomatoes simmered in Charmoula and layered with Preserved Lemon Couscous and Fontina Cheese in the manner of Lasagna and baked in a hot oven, then topped with a Cumin scented Tomato Sauce

Thai Coconut Ratatouille: Japanese Eggplant, Roma Tomatoes, Green Cabbage, and Bananas simmered in Coconut, Lemongrass, and Ginger Broth, served in Green Tea Crepes
Hello cheflayne... I am new here. When I saw yr reply to the sous chef above, I think yr answer was "wow".Need advice how u learnt these things as I have the difficulty to learn western dish. Thank you Chef.
 
 
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OK chef69, here's an answer to your first "?" (I hope).

"Confit" is simply saying ... "... to cook something in oil; or sugar, for some items". Now to me, "garlic confit" is either cooking in oil flavored with garlic, or cooking garlic in oil. For the first, easy, smash the ever-loving bageebies out of a nice bunch of roasted garlic cloves, then run them through the blender in the oil until you can't tell there is anything but oil. For the second, a little more complicated but still easy. Gently cook in really good olive oil, the cloves from six(6) heads of garlic with a fistful of thyme, rosemary and basil. Use enough oil to cover everything and cook until very soft but not yet browned (30-45 min.). Pour it all into a jar and it's good six(6)+ months refrigerated. I use fresh herbs and my choices are not carved in anything.
 
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OK chef69, here's an answer to your first "?" (I hope).

"Confit" is simply saying ... "... to cook something in oil; or sugar, for some items". Now to me, "garlic confit" is either cooking in oil flavored with garlic, or cooking garlic in oil. For the first, easy, smash the ever-loving bageebies out of a nice bunch of roasted garlic cloves, then run them through the blender in the oil until you can't tell there is anything but oil. For the second, a little more complicated but still easy. Gently cook in really good olive oil, the cloves from six(6) heads of garlic with a fistful of thyme, rosemary and basil. Use enough oil to cover everything and cook until very soft but not yet browned (30-45 min.). Pour it all into a jar and it's good six(6)+ months refrigerated. I use fresh herbs and my choices are not carved in anything.
Thanks Chef IceMan. It's very helpful except yr last words ....."are not carved in anything"(last sentences) which I don't quite get it.  I apology for my lack of understanding in English.
 
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Thanks Chef IceMan. It's very helpful except yr last words ....."are not carved in anything"(last sentences) which I don't quite get it.  I apology for my lack of understanding in English.
 
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Hello cheflayne... I am new here. When I saw yr reply to the sous chef above, I think yr answer was "wow".Need advice how u learnt these things as I have the difficulty to learn western dish. Thank you Chef.
 
I have a natural curiosity and willingness to learn and have been fortunate enough to have worked with many talented chefs over the years.
 
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