YAnKT (Yet another knife thread)

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by timtanguay, May 5, 2011.

  1. timtanguay

    timtanguay

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    Line Cook
    I recently got married, and was given an 8in chef cutco knife. It holds a decent edge, but has never been razor sharp. The "comfortable" ergo handle pisses me off because I like to two finger pinch grip my knives and it just gets in the way of my fingers.

    My requirements are as follows.

    - a 10 inch chef knife (I prefer the santoku shape)

    - a pairing knife (currently have a 12 dollar henkle jobby. The steel is absolute crap, does not hold an edge well)

    - stone or steel for edge maintenance.

    Japanese steel please :)

    I do not have any brand loyalties, generally like a simple tang and grip on my blades and appreciate a thinner well balanced blade. The knives are for serious home use. I am looking for a no BS knife that holds a razor sharp edge well. I don't mind forking out the $$$ for good quality, but I would like some of my $500 left over to spend on a nice solid wood chopping board.  I currently have a couple of plastic jobbies, and am getting very frustrated with them skittering all over the counter (even with a rung out moist towel underneath). 

    Links to suggestions, and why you recommend them would be greatly appreciated. I currently live in canada, but have access to a US mailing box.

    EDIT:

    After some reading, I have discovered that this stone



    combined with this stone



    Should produce an excellent edge. I would really rather go with a ceramic 5000 grit. Does anyone have suggestions that won't break the bank?
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2011
  2. timtanguay

    timtanguay

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  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Cruise around MAC Knives before you spend any money. IMHO, there is nothing "wrong" with Shun, but you can do better.
     
  4. timtanguay

    timtanguay

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    Thanks Peter. I have been looking around and I like the look of the Japanese Fujiwara FKM series petty knife and 240mm Gyutu. The price is certainly excellent. Does anyone know if these good knives?
     
  5. ruscal

    ruscal

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    At home cook
    check out Tojiro

    and Misono MX10

    and also Nenox

    just my 2 cents :)
     
  6. pensacola tiger

    pensacola tiger

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    Cook At Home
    Yes, they are very good knives. I have the carbon steel series (FKH) gyuto and petty and have been very pleased with them. I would recommend that you get the 120mm petty rather than the longer 150mm, as the shorter length will make it easier to use it as a paring knife.

    Those two knives, the three stone set that was recommended earlier and some way to flatten your waterstones (wet/dry 220 grit sandpaper on a smooth ceramic tile will work well) and you should be set.

    Good luck.

    Rick
     
  7. timtanguay

    timtanguay

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    Thanks for all your help guys.

    I ended up ordering the following:

    Fujiwara FKM 240mm gyuto

    Fujiwara FKM petty, 120mm.

    Combo stone, 1000/4000.

    I also ordered from amazon

    a DMT coarse/extra coarse diamond stone

    a DMT fine/Extra Fine diamond stone

    a spyderco ultra fine ceramic stone

    a bench vice for holding the stones

    Someone at a local cooking supplies store owed me a favour, so I managed to pick up a Shun Classic 3.5 inch paring knife for $40 :D

    Edit

    My Japanese knives arrived today, and are they ever sexy. I am not sure if I will ever be able to go back to Western style knives. Will the gyuto be beefy enough to slice through chicken joints? I am very careful about gapping joints before slicing, and I don't expect it to go through bone. I plan on doing quite a bit of Sockeye fishing this year. Will the gyuto be able to handle the pin bones and spine of a salmon without too much risk of chipping?  Should I bother with a deba or a boning knife?
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2011