Wusthof 2933 vs Trizor XV?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by Sue Flay, Jan 13, 2018.

  1. Sue Flay

    Sue Flay

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Exp:
    Cook at Home
    Hi everyone,

    The more research I do the more undecided I become. I'm a home cook upgrading my knives. Sharpening my knives will not be a new hobby, I don't require the absolute sharpest edge possible. I just want a convenient way to maintain and occasionally sharpen them for a home cook's use. I've narrowed down to the Chef's Choice Trizor XV and Wusthof 2933 PEtec electric sharpeners (also made by Edgecraft - Chef's Choice). I do not plan to obtain any 20-degree "classic" knives. I know the Trizor sharpens to a convex 15-degree angle and the Wusthof a 14-degree "PEtec" angle.

    I cannot decide which model would best suit my needs. I don't think the Wusthof Santoku is suited for either, however the MAC Santoku angle is only 1 degree difference (not sure about the profile).

    I am leaning towards the Wusthof sharpener as it matches my Ikon Chef, and then re-profile the Vic and MAC Santoku. I was hoping for some advice from experts n this forum.

    My current knives:
    Victorinox Fibrox pro 8-inch Chef (15-degree factory angle)
    Wusthof Ikon 8-inch Chef with Grantons (14-degree PEtec angle)
    Mercer Culinary Millennia 10-Inch Wide Serrated Bread Knife

    Future Knives:
    Santoku (possibly a MAC MSK-65 - 15degree angle or Wusthof Ikon 7-inch with Grantons - 10 degree angle)
    Pairing
    Utility
    Boning

    Thanks in advance for any advice.
     
  2. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    213
    Exp:
    Chef Emeritus
    I have both. They are virtually the same. I know that the specification stated a 1° difference, but I really couldn't tell.

    Just get whichever one you can find for cheaper.

    By the way, what benuser said is true, but since these sharpeners give your knife a triple bevel edge, the detrimental effect is less noticeable. I've used them on my knives for over ten years with satisfying results.
     
    Last edited: Jan 14, 2018
  3. rick alan

    rick alan

    Messages:
    2,371
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Along with Benusers comment, German stainless really can't hold a 15deg edge let alone a 14, not unless you limit it's use to no board contact cutting. The Krupp 4116 steel used in most all German stainless knives is relatively poor blade material. It favors the thick edges and conservative sharpening angles historical to German stainless knives.

    I have an Ikon I would use strictly for cutting in-hand, with a 12deg edge. For the heck of it I put a 20+deg microbevel on it and gave it about 200 whacks on the board fine slicing some celery. On the resharpening I had to remove a significant amount of fatigued steel to regain a decent edge. A straight 15 edge would not have fared even this well.

    Consider moving on from German stainless, and learning to sharpen by hand.
     
  4. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    213
    Exp:
    Chef Emeritus
    I find that these sharpeners give German steel a better edge. My Wusthof and Victorinox always get a longer lasting edge than something like Hattori and Misono. Japanese knives tend to get a pretty weak edge coming out of these machines, especially the very thin ones like the MAC Original.
     
    millionsknives likes this.
  5. rick alan

    rick alan

    Messages:
    2,371
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Those sharpeners will do a whole lot less damage to thick-edged German stainless that's for sure.
     
    benuser likes this.
  6. aliphares

    aliphares

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    15
    Exp:
    Home cook
    +1 to everything Rick said. I'm curious about something else if you don't mine though. Why do you need a santoku? What can it do that a chef and utility can't?
     
  7. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,447
    Likes Received:
    428
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    I rank sharpening options in this order:
    Stones, wet grinder, belt sander, jig (edge pro), sandpaper on a 2x4, diamond rod, bottom of a teacup, the sidewalk, an electric pullthrough sharpener
     
  8. Sue Flay

    Sue Flay

    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Exp:
    Cook at Home
    Thanks everyone for the input. Would one of the forum regulars be able to direct me to the best thread on sharpening stones for a complete beginner?
     
  9. aliphares

    aliphares

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    15
    Exp:
    Home cook
    Dunno about a thread. But you can find a great complete playlist by Jon from Japanese Knife Imports on YouTube. Mark from CKTG has one too
     
  10. rick alan

    rick alan

    Messages:
    2,371
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    You can get a King 300 on Amazon for about $25, and the $55 Iminishi 1K6K
    https://www.chefknivestogo.com/imtwosi1kst.html The cktg diamond flattening plate is a nice addition too.

    With the 300 you can go a long ways to thinning your Ikon to something half decent, and I'm sure your other knives can use it as well. The Iminishi will get you as sharp as you need and do it fairly quick. Raise a burr with the 1K side, then deburr (as shown in Jon's videos) on the 6K and strop in a microbevel.
     
  11. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    213
    Exp:
    Chef Emeritus
    LOL. Don't let these comments discourage you from getting one of my most used tools in the kitchen.

    Back in the day, I was always known as the person with the sharpest knives in the kitchen, and half of my knives were sharpened with this electric sharpener.

    Granted, it's not as easy to use as most people think; it takes a bit of practice to perfect the sharpening technique (took me about a month). But once you nailed the technique down, your knives will be sharper than 80% or even, dare I say, 90% of those that sharpen their knives using stones; most people, I find, use faulty technique when sharpening on a stone.

    It will take years before you can get a perfect edge with a stone. And do you really want to spend 10-15 minutes with a stone, and deal with all the mess that it comes with, every time you want a sharp knife? Convenience is a very valuable thing.

    Of course, you can use both (like me). My analogy would be a fast food/take out (electric sharpeners) vs a properly cooked meal (stones); the first gets you by just fine most of the time, and the latter is something you do, maybe, on a weekend.
     
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

    Messages:
    2,371
    Likes Received:
    143
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Takes years to learn how to sharpen on stones? Pat is that really how long it took you to beat a Trizor? Eh what do I know of that anyways. I'd just say that if going with an electric stick to cheap stainless as Pat already implied. You can get a pair of Tramontinas for less than $15, so matters not how long they last.
     
  13. aliphares

    aliphares

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    15
    Exp:
    Home cook
    Electric sharpeners (good ones at least) can get you and edge that's easily as sharp as any mid-level stone set. But it will also take out huge chunks of metal. Pat is correct, but so is Rick. I wouldn't use something fancier than a victorinox because they won't last nearly as much.
     
  14. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

    Messages:
    529
    Likes Received:
    213
    Exp:
    Chef Emeritus
    Yeah, about 3 years of weekly sharpening I believe; that's around 150 sessions? I found it the most difficult to keep the angle consistent between the different shapes and lengths. It was especially hard to get the correct angles when you're sharpening very different knives in the same session (e.g. a Chinese cleaver and a sujihiki). Not to mention the dreaded Japanese knives with different angel on each side. Then there was the problem of messing up a great edge you've already achieved when you move up to a finer stone and your sharpening angel is slightly off.

    I hear that a lot. But from my experience, I don't find it to be that worrisome. I've never lost a knife through an electric sharpener. The stones, on the other hand, have consumed at least 3 of my knives. Then again, maybe it's because of the way I use the stones that make them eat so much out of my knives every time I sharpen.
     
  15. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

    Messages:
    2,011
    Likes Received:
    181
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    My two cents:

    1. For your knives, either electric will be fine. By the time you take off enough metal to face problems, you'll probably be ready to buy something new anyway.

    2. A santoku is pointless repetition, functionally speaking. Buy one only if you want a toy.

    3. A great starter stone is a King Combi 800/4000. Soak for 15-20 minutes before using (submerge completely in water). You will find sharpening your current knives mildly unpleasant and somewhat tedious. If you ever upgrade to good steel you'll be stunned at how much easier it is.

    4. Don't be pushed. If you like your knives, there's no sin in that, and none at all in sharpening on either of these electrics.

    5. You should, however, hone ("steel") your knives daily. An Idahone ceramic rod is the best. The soft steel in your knives needs to be brought into line constantly; it does not need fresh grinding often.
     
    aliphares likes this.
  16. aliphares

    aliphares

    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    15
    Exp:
    Home cook
    Obviously it won't make the knoves disappear overnight, and maybe focusing on the long run too much, that's just me not liking upgrading too many times because I feel it's wasting money. As for the stones, they're probably the easiest way to ruin a knife if you don't know how to use one. It's why were suggesting a stone now, this is a good point to learn to sharpen, it's also why beginners should always start with medium grit stones, nothing that can too easily ruin the knife.
     
  17. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,447
    Likes Received:
    428
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    Its hard to mess up irreversibly with stones
     
    benuser likes this.
  18. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

    Messages:
    2,011
    Likes Received:
    181
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Agreed. I was wondering about that myself.