would you like to teach me how to make ice cream ?

69
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Joined Apr 29, 2015
i tried many times to make ice cream and yogurt ,i don't know why the taste is not good ,feel strange .  does anyone good at this ? tell me some recipes please ! 
 
4,474
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
This is the perfect time for an ice cream thread!
Yes there are most likely lots and lots of great threads but things in the dairy world are never static!
New brands and flavors and mix ins are always popping up....

It is really helpful when asking for help with recipes and procedures is to provide a brief history of what you have tried and what did not work (the results).

What do you want from your yogurt....thick or thinner....flavored or plain?

Same with your ice cream....custard or not?
What sort of machine are you using?
How much product will it produce?

mimi

Meanwhile I will dig around for my pecan praline ice cream recipe and scale it for smaller machines.
I start by making a soft but not chewy praline candy (has bourbon whiskey in it ;)
Family fave.
 
965
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Joined Apr 4, 2012
David Lebovitz, who used to be a pastry chef at Chez Panisse, wrote what is probably the best book for home cooks on making ice cream out there right now.

In addition to his book, The Perfect Scoop, he has a blog with tons of good ice cream recipes on it. I'd suggest getting the book for the chapters describing the hows and whys of doing things properly for the best results but if it's just recipes you are after, just google "David Lebovitz Ice Cream" and you will find many free recipes that have been tested for use by home cooks.
 

cerise

Banned
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What ingredients, method and equipment do you use?

Popsicles are trending right now - with ingredients as simple as frozen bananas and some honey, to yogurt and fruit, to boozy "spa" pops (with cucumbers to kiwis and berries) - all poured into popsicle molds and frozen. 
 
1,086
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Joined Jun 6, 2007
I would start with: what is your expectations?

When it comes to ice cream there are 3 different categories: industrial, commercial and homemade.

If you're looking to get the texture of supermarket ice cream (milk or yoghurt) you must understand that there is no way to simulate the texture of industrial ice cream at home. Industrial ice cream incorporate tons on air in their product and have inaccessible ingredients, equipment and rapid cooling capacity.

If you're looking for a boutique like commercial quality product then you will require a very good ($$) machine.

The trick to good (homemade) ice cream is to control the size of the ice crystals.  That means a machine that can (nearly) freeze the product while it churns.  If the freezing is not complete during churning then the ice cream will grow larger crystals while it stands in the freezer with disappointing results. Using high fat ingredients and high amounts of sugar does help keep sugar crystals small (while adding lot's of calories)

With my curious nature and background, I have made decent gelato (and sherberts) with a ziplock bag, elbow grease and a rolling pin over a period of 2-3 days (not many are willing to follow the instructions though).

Luc H.
 
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69
10
Joined Apr 29, 2015
thank you guys .

i guess the mater is my machine !  i want to know how much i should cost for a better ice cream machine ? 
 
4,474
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
Look around online and find 2-3 that fit your needs plus your budget and link them up for everyone to look at.
I am sure we can help you with your choice.
Vicarious shopping is my favorite kind!

mimi
 

cerise

Banned
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Joined Jul 5, 2013
 
I would start with: what is your expectations?

When it comes to ice cream there are 3 different categories: industrial, commercial and homemade.

If you're looking to get the texture of supermarket ice cream (milk or yoghurt) you must understand that there is no way to simulate the texture of industrial ice cream at home. Industrial ice cream incorporate tons on air in their product and have inaccessible ingredients, equipment and rapid cooling capacity.

If you're looking for a boutique like commercial quality product then you will require a very good ($$) machine.

The trick to good (homemade) ice cream is to control the size of the ice crystals.  That means a machine that can (nearly) freeze the product while it churns.  If the freezing is not complete during churning then the ice cream will grow larger crystals while it stands in the freezer with disappointing results. Using high fat ingredients and high amounts of sugar does help keep sugar crystals small (while adding lot's of calories)

With my curious nature and background, I have made decent gelato (and sherberts) with a ziplock bag, elbow grease and a rolling pin over a period of 2-3 days (not many are willing to follow the instructions though).

Luc H.
I think you may be onto something re the ice crystals and air.  @Luc H you reminded me of recipes like "Kick the Can Ice Cream" made with coffee cans, rock salt & ice. You kick the cans around on the Beach for a few hours with the kids.  LOL.  I also vaguely recall the recipes for ice cream kneaded in baggies.  Too funny.  As much as I'd like some Haagen Daz and Ben and Jerry's, I may opt for the popsicle maker, and give it a try. (I have to watch my sugar.) I've seen them for about $2.00 on ebay - if you don't mind waiting a few weeks, since they come from China.  They can probably be found in stores, but I haven't had time.  If all else fails,  maybe this will tempt you into giving it a try.  Good Luck. 

https://www.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=popsicles&rs=rs&term_meta[]=popsicles|recentsearch|1
 
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nicko

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We actually have some excellent tutorials on how to make ice cream.
[article="27007"]How To Make Ice Cream Without An Ice Cream Machine  [/article][article="27727"]How To Make Vanilla Ice Cream  [/article][article="27905"]Pumpkin Pie Ice Cream  [/article][article="28015"]Cherry Ice Cream  [/article][article="27822"]How To Make Cantaloupe Ice Cream  [/article][article="27790"]Lello Musso Pola 5030 Dessert Maker  [/article]
 
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Our Ice Cream

I lived on a farm and we produced our own cream and milk. I ran the centrifuge separator and I liked to spin that up fast until the cream was very thick. We diluted it with milk to thin it out when using it for ice cream. Our ice cream maker was a manual hand crank. We had to bust up the ice by hand with a hammer and a gunnysack cloth. Rock salt was used to make the ice melt quickly and lower the temperature of the brine. The key ingredients were great cream and great fruit. Sometimes we had real vanilla bean while other times not. The sugar and often eggs are combined with the cream as in making a custard on the stove while stirring.

(Cream-based ice cream is usually made from un-cooked ingredients while custard based ice cream are first cooked. Any mixture you dip your finger into to sample that taste yummy will make a fine ice cream. Please taste and determine if you think it may need a pinch of salt for taste.)

Let cooked custards cool before using them. When using fruit, no big pieces should be allowed or they will form hard ice chucks. The better the fruit, the better the ice cream. The paddles will help break up the fruit further as the ice cream churns. Churn until it has become too hard to turn. Pull out core. Wipe off all the salty outsides. Pull the paddles, knock excess ice cream back into base. Refrigerate a few hours or more until firm.

The emulsifier xanthan gum in proportion of ¼ ~ ½ teaspoon per quart of ice cream base will help prevent ice crystallization.

There is no such thing as bad ice cream. Half-and-half produces a good ice cream just not quite as rich.
 
252
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Joined May 7, 2012
If you're looking to get the texture of supermarket ice cream (milk or yoghurt) you must understand that there is no way to simulate the texture of industrial ice cream at home. Industrial ice cream incorporate tons on air in their product and have inaccessible ingredients, equipment and rapid cooling capacity.

I had a chef once that asked for an ice cream machine (the big fancy ones with two horizontal spinning cylinders side by side) when corporate decided not to swing for it he set up the food processor in the walk in freezer and would pour custard into it. It made the closest to grocery store I've cream I've ever had.
 
1,086
39
Joined Jun 6, 2007
I had a chef once that asked for an ice cream machine (the big fancy ones with two horizontal spinning cylinders side by side) when corporate decided not to swing for it he set up the food processor in the walk in freezer and would pour custard into it. It made the closest to grocery store I've cream I've ever had.
How did that work, did he put frozen or cold custard in the processor?

Did he let the processor run for a while or just enough to break the custard then let freeze while standing in the freezer?

Cool Idea though but unfortunately not really accessible to a home cook.

Luc H.
 
5,192
296
Joined Jul 28, 2001
My method is a little time consuming, but it's a fool proof way to eliminate any crystallizing or any other improper texture or taste.

We refer to it as the cold to hot method. I have used this procedure both in commercial semi volume and at home.

We make 1/2 a recipe of which ever flavor we're making. Almost always heavy cream, half and half, sugar, and egg yolks. We bring it up like a typical creme anglaise. We usually will pull

this around 80c. Into containers and set out to cool. Maybe an hour for a 10L.  When there is no steam coming off the mix it's ready for flavor to be added.We add the flavor required for a full batch. It is then put up in the cooler for at least 12 hrs. or until completely ice cold. This can be stored in the cooler and used when needed.

When we go to process, we bring up the other half the same way. When done we let stand an cool like the first batch. It then goes in the machine. While it's churning we start adding the cold mix

a sixth at a time. The last of the cold should be going in just as the ice cream is starting to go from thick to semi hard.

make any sense? I GTG
 
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Joined Feb 4, 2005
I bought ben & Jerrys book but didn't find it helpful. They said on one page about cooking the mix but never said how or why. What is the difference between making ice cream and gelato, bought some Breyers Gelato  but it has corn syrup so isn't the real thing.


I have one of them table top ice cream makers with the freezing insert. Problem is I never have room in the freezer to freeze the tub so never used it.
 
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4,474
422
Joined Jun 27, 2012
My method is a little time consuming, but it's a fool proof way to eliminate any crystallizing or any other improper texture or taste.
We refer to it as the cold to hot method. I have used this procedure both in commercial semi volume and at home.
We make 1/2 a recipe of which ever flavor we're making. Almost always heavy cream, half and half, sugar, and egg yolks. We bring it up like a typical creme anglaise. We usually will pull
this around 80c. Into containers and set out to cool. Maybe an hour for a 10L.  When there is no steam coming off the mix it's ready for flavor to be added.We add the flavor required for a full batch. It is then put up in the cooler for at least 12 hrs. or until completely ice cold. This can be stored in the cooler and used when needed.
When we go to process, we bring up the other half the same way. When done we let stand an cool like the first batch. It then goes in the machine. While it's churning we start adding the cold mix
a sixth at a time. The last of the cold should be going in just as the ice cream is starting to go from thick to semi hard.
make any sense? I GTG

The first time I read this it made perfect sense (so much sense that it seemed almost genius lol ;-)
Just came in from a nite walking the sandbars ( you should have been there, pan.... the flounder were thick as thieves....almost like back in the day....PM me for the GPS coordinates if you are interested)and sent one of the Grands for cream as I have a hankerin' for peach ice cream.

Going to go take a nap in the "dark" bedroom.
When the cream gets here someone will hopefully have enuf common sense to complete step one.

mimi
 
5,192
296
Joined Jul 28, 2001
The first time I read this it made perfect sense (so much sense that it seemed almost genius lol ;-)
Just came in from a nite walking the sandbars ( you should have been there, pan.... the flounder were thick as thieves....almost like back in the day....PM me for the GPS coordinates if you are interested)and sent one of the Grands for cream as I have a hankerin' for peach ice cream.

Going to go take a nap in the "dark" bedroom.
When the cream gets here someone will hopefully have enuf common sense to complete step one.

mimi
I guess those imposed regulations worked. Wish we weren't so busy. I'd grab the giggin sticks and ice cream maker and boogie.
 
3
10
Joined Jun 28, 2015
I have demonstrated ice-cream making to a wide audience - where some ladies where about to invest huge sums of money and had second thoughts when demonstrated without fancy machines - Good quality ingredients, ice and a hand held whisk is all that is required!
 

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