Would you ever use a non-drinkable wine for cooking?

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Would you ever use a non-drinkable wine for cooking?  IE to make a pan sauce.

I was told salt is intentionally added to a wine, which had also turned to vinegar (not sure if that was the result of the salt), to make it a "cooking wine".
 

phatch

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Salt is added to make it unpleasant to drink and so that it is not handled under the alcohol laws of the region selling it. It's low grade and not worth it.
 
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Never.  You can find a ton of nice wine that can go in the dish and in a glass for you to enjoy while making the dish or eating it.

Lots of solid sauvignon blanc or pinot noir.
 
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"Cooking Wine" is swill. There are plenty of sub $5 bottles of wine out there that you can cook with and drink.
Exactly. And that begs the question: why is there such a thing as cooking wine? Is it just so that they can sell it without being affected by alcohol laws? Is salted alcohol not subject to the same laws as unsalted alcohol? Are salted-rim margheritas not alcohol? I don't get it.
 
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And youll notice its often no where near the alcohol section.
Its really not wine at all.
Better to use good quality red wine vinegarm
Or better yet, I cook with white and red wines from walmart
regulary. Chardonnay, chenin blanc,
zifandel, etc. Theyre lowest line is cheap and drinkable.
 
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Speaking of cooking with chardonnay, I often hear discussions that white wines with oak are not good for cooking when they become concentrated but I've never really noticed a difference in the end product.  Thoughts?
 
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Like was mentioned above... there are lots of available options for those who either don't or won't consume.

The local Spec's has pickled Cipollini  on the app bar... I keep some handy as the brine is awesome in a good roast gravy.

mimi
 
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Also, I'm a big fan of substituting a good white vermouth (0.75 the amount of white wine called for) when I am out of wine (or don't want to use the especially good one I am drinking).

It also lasts a long time in the cupboard.  Actually not that long, I like martinis.

/img/vbsmilies/smilies/drinkbeer.gif  
 
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kuan

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Box wine should be fine.  At least that is drinkable.
 
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You should cook with the same varietal that you plan to drink with the dish. It doesn't have to be the same wine ... just the same varietal. If you're gonna drink a $95 pinot ... you can use a $9 pinot to cook with. 
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Cooking with cheap junk wine tastes like you cooked with cheap junk wine. Inexpensive is so much different than cheap. 
 
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Exactly. And that begs the question: why is there such a thing as cooking wine? Is it just so that they can sell it without being affected by alcohol laws? Is salted alcohol not subject to the same laws as unsalted alcohol? Are salted-rim margheritas not alcohol? I don't get it.
yup



I don't cook with wine, I cook


We have very funny liquor laws in Canada..... The salted wine crappola was a way to get around paying the liquor taxes on cooking wine. And the prov. gov'ts here slap up to 125% taxes on booze. I remember when it came in 4qt jugs with a screw cap. Mind you this was in the early '80's when there was no wine industry to speak of in Canada.

Up untill a few years ago I could get decent 40% pastry booze (brandy, orange, coffee, kirsch, etc) from the Luxardo brand in Italy. Then the liqour laws changed, and suppliers couldn't import it anymore. What was available was this gelled snot-like substance, and almost impossible to use for soaking sponge or other purposes.

Waay back when, there would be a lot of alcoholics working in tne big kitchens, and booze always went missing. One way to deal with it was to add heavy brine to all the booze to stop he abuse. Nasty business....
 
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Cooking with cheap junk wine tastes like you cooked with cheap junk wine. Inexpensive is so much different than cheap. 
[/quote]

I stand corrected....I dont cook with cheap wine, I cook
with decent quality inexpensive wines.
Thank you, Ice Chef.
 
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The only rational reason I have ever known to use it is when teaching or cooking with children.
 
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Hey ... I'm not sayin' ... I'm just sayin'.  

"We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery."
 

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