Worst things about being a Chef

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Joined Mar 1, 2011
So you are scheduled to do this? Doesn't make much sense to me you would be a useless sob after two weeks.... Where exactly does this.... Why not hire more people?

I've pulled long hours done double shifts my max is 18.5 hrs 1 shift, but it is NOT normal and certainly not sustainable. And I got paid alright to do it. People quit and call in sick but to schedule 80 hrs is BS
Schedule? That's funny.

Good sir, I actually have to say, you are probably the luckiest cook\chef in the world if you have not had extended periods of time in your career where you've had to do this. Again, I think more chefs will tell you that at one point or another in their career they have had to work hours like this. Longer than say a couple weeks or so.

If I didn't work the hours I did, things that needed to get done for the restaurant to function wouldn't get done.

Hire other people? Why would they do that? Especially when they have myself, as well as others on salary.
 
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Joined Apr 29, 2011
chefboyOG.......I've worked in three provinces and one territory and have worked hours like that for weeks and several times months at a time with no days off.You must be in BC.
 
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Joined Oct 23, 2013
OK
Im not saying it doesn't happen, I am just saying that a restaurant shouldn't hire expecting it to be like that.

If you really did 80-90 hrs a week for extended period like more than two months it becomes YOUR fault lol. Cause then you are a sucker for punishment. I ran a skeleton crew before i know what long hours are....

I also know many people embellish their actual hours ask them to clock in you see a different picture.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2011
It's simply sink or swim. When you realize things can't get done correctly at you 60 hours a week , things quickly escalate.

A sucker for punishment? That would be if all those extra hours weren't put in, then services start to go down hill with the first half of a push. Or when your kitchen becomes a gross mess. Or inventory doesn't get done. Things slip thru the cracks. I'm not saying it's smart. I won't do it anymore with a wife and a family. Just don't call b.s. on me when you don't know the sutuation.
 
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Joined May 14, 2014
An old school chef i worked for said that when he came up, the base expectation for him was 10 hour days, six days a week. When that is your starting schedule, its real easy to see it start to creep up- murphy's law, right? ChefboyOG, what kind of hours do you work?
 
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Joined Oct 23, 2013
I work 40ish hrs a week salary, 7-3ish.

It is BS a place hiring a chef expecting 80 hrs.

Not saying it doesn't happen I just think it is ridiculous.

I don't think people can function at acceptable levels pulling them hours.

If you are the Chef hire people and delegate some work.

If the owner expects 60-90hrs work Its BS. Do the labor costs on and make it work don't be a slave.

Bottom line: Things aren't getting done hire some people who get the work done. Manage the kitchen.
 
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Joined May 14, 2014
Now, see, thats something i've never heard of... a chef working 40 hours. Maybe the guys at bon appetite, but restaurant chefs usually figure on 50 minimum- and whatever needs to be done past that. If you're already in, you already know why you're doing it... then you just do.
 
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Joined Feb 17, 2010
I worked 80-100 hrs a week regularly for 7 years when I was doing movie catering. Hourly union wage with all the overtime. Double time was figured at 2 1/2 x's hourly rate. For me there was an incentive to work those kind of hours, it is also kind of the norm for film work regardless of what you do on set.

I also worked my share of 60 hr weeks when I had a salaried position.
 
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Joined Aug 22, 2013
Creating a perfect plate up and clipping the ledge on your way to the window, so everything just falls apart. Working for chefs who put out worse project than you.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2011
How about working saute at a place with a very poorly designed menu. That's one of my least favorite things. Once worked at a place where more that half of the saute items where 3 pan pick ups. That will chap your @$$ on a crazy Friday night.
 
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Joined May 14, 2014
What about badly designed kitchens- five steps from the stove to the reach in? Massive pillar between the grill and the window. Only enough refrigeration for proteins because the kitchen hasnt been updated since 1983.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2011
What about badly designed kitchens- five steps from the stove to the reach in? Massive pillar between the grill and the window. Only enough refrigeration for proteins because the kitchen hasnt been updated since 1983.
Yup thag definitely sucks, lol. Years ago worked at an old Country Club, clubhouse was built in the 30's. Set up was pitiful.
 
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Joined Jun 2, 2014
I love being a chef. I love being creative and sweating and learning on the fly. I love the "Just get it done" attitude and the natural survival of the fittest atmosphere. What I hate is being treated differently due to my gender, not my skills. Being sexually harassed and eyeballed and being called names for not supporting barbaric, dangerous and sexualized behavior. I know it's the culture of the kitchen industry, but it's also 2014. 
 
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Joined Jun 2, 2014
Also, working in a kitchen in South West Florida. All the kitchens i've seen, have been really disgusting and commercial equipment is not mandatory. So, cheap crock pots and walmart bought equipment seems to be the norm. 
 
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Joined Jun 15, 2014
What ticks me off.  Full dining room, full wheel,  table of 12 just receives food, frantic waitress runs up.  OMG I forgot to put one customers order in and the rest of the table is eating...Can you rush a well done 12 oz steak??? REALLY!!!!!.  Up side.. When you look out into the dining room and see people smiling and obviously enjoying your food...Thats why I keep plugging away...Makes all the BS worth it.. 
 
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