wood burning ultralight stove

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by reeock, Apr 6, 2010.

  1. reeock

    reeock

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    psyched to get cooking in the backcountry with my newest appliancehttp://crookedblueline.blogspot.com
     
  2. kristopher

    kristopher

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    Line Cook
    Anyone know how to flag something as spam? 
     
  3. reeock

    reeock

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     not spam dude, just my first post.
     
  4. reeock

    reeock

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    sorry about the triple mis-posting
     
  5. nichole

    nichole

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    hmmm... well it does seem to be more earth friendly than using natural gas too cook food...
     
  6. homemadecook

    homemadecook

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    Well, might be a spam but, it is really a eco-friendly appliance. :)
     
  7. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Not so much in Utah where you seem to be now. There are frequent fire bans in the backcountry in Utah and this device would be included.
     
  8. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Or many other places, where burning wood, whether in an open fire or contained, is either banned outright or considered unethical by hikers and backcountry campers.

    Besides which, there isn't anything particularly new about either the concept or application. There have been other commercial versions (Phil---you remember the old Pyromid stoves?), though the years. And the Scouts have always made similar stoves by recycling metal cans.
     
  9. reeock

    reeock

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    spam??? have you guys even looked at the link? I'm not trying to advertise anything! Are there any backcountry cooks here or not?
     
  10. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Why yes, there are. 

    And generally a first time poster with links and plugging a product is spam. Not saying you are as your later posts have verified.

    The stove isn't of interest to me in my situation as I pointed out. Too many fire bans. And there are plenty of similar DIY products for this as KYH pointed out. Sounds like discussion to me.
     
  11. reeock

    reeock

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    if no interest, why bother responding? Conversation with people not interested in the topic is lame. No offense intended, but of course you don't want to start wood fires where wood fires are banned. Also, no plugging involved in my post, if you read it, it said I was interested in TRYing it out in the backcountry. I don't live in Utah, it's green here and fires are a non issue, especially in a small contained "hobo stove". But thanks for the input.
     
  12. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Because people should know about regulations that impact such a tool as well.

    The design looks like it soots up the pans a lot. Does it?
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2010
  13. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I'd say that's a given, Phil. Anytime you cook directly over wood flames you're going to get soot. That's why, in the old days, mess gear always had its own carrying sack---to keep the soot off everything else.

    I also don't buy the justifications for it, that by eliminating the fuel canister you open up room for food or booze. First off, if you're using a liquid fuel stove, you don't need extra for a short trip. If using butane, the cans don't take up all that much space.

    And as for being a two-burner type camp cook, gimme a break. If I'm alone the last thing I care about is gourmet cooking. On a solo trip there are other reasons I'm there, and food is, truly, just for sustainance. More often than not, on that kind of a trek, it's pitch dark by the time I stop, and I'm not looking to spend any more time than needed before hitting the sack. If it requires more than boiling some water it's too much trouble.

    On the other hand, if I'm in a group (even a group of two), and food is part of the social experience, there's at least one more stove to call upon.
     
  14. reeock

    reeock

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    the two burner reference is obviously not for when I'm out alone, yet I still bring two. the wood burning stove sucks if you've been under a couple days of rain. What fits inside that little wood burner is my alchohol stove. it's less than 2 ounces in weight, made out of a heineken can, cost me 15$. It's by minibull designs. I love it. instead of snow peak canisters I can bring a few oz's of alchohol. it can be my burner number two or back up stove in unfriendly weather. so, gimme a break? your break is givin when there's nothing around but wet wood and a simple oz of alcohol burns for 10 min, and boils 12 oz of water in 5. it's a reliable cook system id totally recommend. it's taken me years to find the right kitchen for canoeing or backpacking, and I finally did. what's cool too is that the bushbuddy woodburner also acts as the perfect windscreen/pot stand for the minibull.

    and heirloomer- justified or not, booze is way more important than fuel! (insert obvious sarcastic attempt at humor disclaimer here)
     
  15. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    justified or not, booze is way more important than fuel!

    And, after all, you did say you carry an alcohol stove. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

    Seriously, where did I even infer that carrying booze was unjustified. What I said, basically, is that fuel isn't all that space consumptive, and there's always room for the sippin whisky.
     
  16. reeock

    reeock

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    if my shoulders could handle a cast iron dutch oven, I'd bring that too. KY, what do you carry if your out solo, our out in a group?
     
  17. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    When I was very much younger than I am I did carry a cast-iron skillet. Everyone said I was crazy. But they sure enjoyed what got cooked in it.

    Those were the days when sophisticated backpacking gear consisted of Army surplus from WW II. If you've never struggled buttoning together the two halves of a pup tent you have no idea who much modern gear has spoiled you.

    Even when more modern gear started appearing it was nothing like today's strong, lightweight, ergo-engineered equipment. Even in the '60s, 45-50 pounds was considered a fair load for a big man. Nowadays we don't think anything of walking off with 65 pounds or more. What's more, when you carried 50 pounds in the old days you were constantly aware of it. With today's gear, you hardly notice the 65.

    What I carry depends a lot on the kind of trek. Mostly, nowadays, when I'm out it's with other reenactors, and we carry what woods runners of the 18th and early 19th centuries did. And it has to fit in a haversack and possibles bag. At those times, my "kitchen" is a fire-starting kit (flint, steel, charcloth, tinder) and a small tin skillet with a folding handle.

    That's one of the reasons I seem to be knocking the wood-burning stove. Personally, after having played with them in one form or another through the years, I think they're  totally unnecessary pieces of equipment. If open fires are permitted, then just build a small fire and be done. If necessary, a small 4- or 5-wire grate is both lighter and less bulky than one of those stoves.

    On a normal hike, with modern gear, I'll most likely be carrying my old Whisper-Lite stove  a couple of small nesting pots, and, it goes without saying, a Sierra cup. The larger the group, of course, the greater amount of community gear we can carry, and that certainly affects cookware. In most respects, bicycling has the same restrictions as backpacking, except that bulk is more important than weight.

    Canoeing, as you know, doesn't have many limitations, and that's when the cast-iron cookware comes out. I don't do backcountry ATVing, like Phil. But if I did I wouldn't hesitate to go whole hog, as he does. I've read most of the literature about backcountry travel, and nowhere does it say you have to be uncomfortable to enjoy the trip.

    A lot also depends on the purpose of the trip. If our intention is backcountry fishing, for instance, we might carry different stuff  than if we were out in a large group whose purpose is socialization.

    The determining factors, always, are weight and bulk. Which is more important, and to what degree, depends on the mode of travel and the number of people available to carry it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2010
  18. fstfrdy

    fstfrdy

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    I like it!! And I do cook when I,m out in the back country even if by myself. I really liked your discription of the tastes. And your rite I your dont have a positive take why respond at all. ps great pics to.
     
  19. teresa

    teresa

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    I agree with Ky Heirloomer.  I have camped for years, backpacking in.  I carry no stove .  If we can not have an open pit , which has only happened once, then we don't cook.  I have pictures of people holding umbrella's, tarps etc over me and the fire protecting  from the rain while I am cooking.  My cast Iron skillet is my favorite.  However in big groups and not real rmote camping, I really like it if I have my Dutch Oven.  Everyone likes it when I unearth my dutch oven full of a fruit cobbler