Wondra Flour

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by adamburgerdavis, Sep 15, 2012.

  1. adamburgerdavis

    adamburgerdavis

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    I left the title less descriptive than usual because I want to know anything people want to say or discuss about this product.

    Where I work we use it to dust sweetbreads, liver, dover sole and softshell crabs before we saute them.

    Obviously there are other uses for this flour, for example I had a fellow cook tell me that it could thicken sauces or soups without having to make a roux, "just sprinkle it in and let it cook out" were his exact words. I have not tried this for fear of screwing something up.

    I'm sure this could be looked up online but i was wondering what cooks had to say about it.

    All responses are appreciated!
     
  2. just jim

    just jim

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    I've used it, in much the way you describe.

    I like rice flour better for dusting.

    Just personal preference.
     
  3. cacioepepe

    cacioepepe

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    All I know about wondra is that its lower in protein than regular flour.  Thats probably why you can add it to hot sauces without getting clumps.  I'm in the same boat, I've only used wondra either by itself or in combination with other flours to dredge before frying or pan roasting.  I'm sure it has some kind of baking quality that is desirable, but like I said, i've never used it in that way.
     
  4. someday

    someday

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    It's a pre-gelatinized flour so that it won't clump and you don't need a roux. 

    I don't know why, but it seems to make crispier coating and batters. I too have used it in a few different places for dredging, esp. sweetbreads and a couple of fish.