Will it split/curdle after freezing?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by rpooley, Feb 20, 2019.

  1. rpooley

    rpooley

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    Finished sauce L'Americaine (with tomalley, roe and reduced with half the cream called for in the recipe).
     
  2. patblue

    patblue

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    Haven't tried it myself - but freezing something that contains cream is always a bit risky...
     
  3. chefross

    chefross

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    I'd be hesitant only because of the cream. All that work only to freeze????
     
  4. rpooley

    rpooley

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    It made more than I needed.... (sad face) @chefross
     
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  5. jam13dfa

    jam13dfa

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    Try bringing back to temp at low heat, or in the souse vide if you have one. If it does break, use an immersion blender.
     
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  6. rpooley

    rpooley

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    That's kind of what I was thinking. The immersion blender has saved many a sauce....
     
  7. chefross

    chefross

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    Wouldn't using an immersion blender destroy the look of the Tomalley roe?
     
  8. rpooley

    rpooley

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    No. I finished the base, strained it and beat in the mix of roe, tomalley, white wine and a bit of flour. Roe and tomalley sieved before mixing with wine and flour so they were pretty well beaten up. Strong simmer for 3 minutes, then reduced.
     
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  9. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Curious as to the recipe. How much cream and did you finish with butter? Also curious as to the flour?
     
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  10. rpooley

    rpooley

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    @cheflayne

    2 lobster bodies, mirepoix, tarragon, parsley, tomato, tomato paste, white wine, peppercorns, bay leaf to yield 2 cups strained stock

    tomalley and roe (both females) put through sieve, mixed with 1/3 cup white wine, 1 T flour (dissolved in a touch of wine)

    whisk tomalley/roe into hot stock, boil for 3 minutes whisking

    strain again, add 1 c heavy cream, reduce by half, strain again

    finish with 1 T cognac, 1 T butter (not before freezing)
     
  11. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    old school / no cream, reduce, finish with about 14 Tbs of butter
    new school / 3/4 cup cream, reduce, finish with about 3 Tbs of butter
    flour / not usually
     
  12. rpooley

    rpooley

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    @cheflayne

    It's pretty much Chef Pepin's recipe from Plaza Athene, including the flour
     
  13. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Who am I to question Jacques Pepin? That is the beauty of the culinary arts, no one way to do things, only lots of food police on duty. I merely pass along what I have gleaned so far in my career. FWIW, I don't pull over to the curb for the food police :~)
     
  14. rpooley

    rpooley

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    "That is the beauty of the culinary arts, no one way to do things, only lots of food police on duty."

    LOL Yes, that is the beauty. I tend to follow the adage "Learn the rules so you can break them properly"
     
  15. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Couldn't agree more...
    even the Dalai Lama is onboard
    Even Pepin changes things up, no cream or flour in this one.
    Monkfish à l'Américaine
    Essential Pepin by Jacques Pepin – serves 4
    About 2 pounds monkfish, preferably large fillets
    2 tablespoons olive oil
    1 onion, cut into ½” pieces (1 cup)
    1 carrot, peeled and cut into ½” pieces (1/2 cup)
    1 small leek, trimmed, leaving some green, split, washed and cut into ½” pieces (1 cup)
    1 stalk of celery, cut into ½” pieces (1/3 cup)
    1 ¼ cups chopped tomato
    2 tablespoons tomato paste
    3 garlic cloves
    1 teaspoon herbs de Provence
    1 ½ teaspoons kosher salt
    1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
    ½ teaspoon fennel seeds
    ½ cup fruity white wine
    1 tablespoon Armagnac or cognac
    1 cup water
    1 tablespoon unsalted butter
    1 tablespoon chopped fresh tarragon
    Cut monkfish into twelve pieces. Heat the oil in a large heavy saucepan until hot but not smoking. Add the onion, carrot, leek, and celery and cook over medium-low heat for 5 minutes. Add tomato, tomato paste, garlic, herbs de Provence, salt, cayenne, fennel seeds, wine, brandy, and water, bring to a boil, and cook over medium heat for 5 minutes.
    Add fish, cover, and simmer gently over low heat for 15 minutes. Remove the pieces of fish from the saucepan and set aside on a platter. Add the butter to the mixture in the pan and, using a hand blender, emulsify the vegetables into a fine puree. You can also leave the sauce chunky if you prefer. Add the fish back into the sauce, sprinkle with the tarragon, and bring to a boil to heat through. Serve with rice.
     
  16. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Pepin’s evolution as he aged is an incredible thing to pay attention to!

    BTW, Julia says it’s okay to freeze the sauce.
     
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  17. rpooley

    rpooley

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    @cheflayne I am suspicious of the tomalley/roe mixture being the culprit (for flour requirement) but me worries that it is some lost lore passed down from chef to plongeur
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2019
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  18. rpooley

    rpooley

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    @brianshaw

    I would watch that series where he and Julia cook together from now until the day I die. Just 2 well-trained people making up half the s*** as they go along.
     
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  19. chefross

    chefross

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    Amusing thread.....
    I always used the roe and tomalley as a garnish, hence my question.