Wild garlic?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by chrisbelgium, Mar 26, 2011.

  1. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Yesterday I bought "allium ursinum" in a garden center. We call it daslook (das=badger/look=garlic). I have to look it up, but seems in english it is "Bear's Garlic"? Is this synonyme for Wild Garlic?

    Has anyone cooked with it before or has any suggestions to use it?

    I have eaten it mixed within a dried tagliatelle pasta that I bought. Tastes a bit between garlic and onion.
     
  2. blueicus

    blueicus

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    According to Wikipedia it looks like the Old World counterpart to the wild garlic/ramps we have in North America.  If the bulbs are still tender we use it like a vegetable or pickle it.  The leaves can be used in purees (like pesto), sliced and sauteed or blanched and used as a wrap for various things (I wrapped boar loin in wild garlic leaves and cooked it sous vide and finished in butter).  It's a neat ingredient.
     
  3. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Thanks Blueicus! I didn't even know there was a bulb involved. The discription on the tag says it's used in salads, thinly sliced. I guess there are many other uses including the ones you mentioned.

    If any help, this is what it looks like;

    [​IMG]
     
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    Those are ramps. They grow here where I live each spring by the hundreds of thousands all over the place. You prepare and eat the bulb. The leaves are edible as well. I pickle them, freeze them, dry them. They have a strong flavor and just 1 or 2 go a long way.

    Cool pic....I've never seen one go to flower before.
     
  5. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I haven't tasted the flowers yet, chefs, but I would expect them to be edible too?

    Interesting how people on different continents use things in specific ways. As I said, the only suggestion on my pot is to finely chop the leaves, and, they also quote these plants have a medicinal purpose. Only, it's not mentioned which purpose exactly.