Wild Boar

Discussion in 'Professional Catering' started by culianryman, Mar 30, 2002.

  1. culianryman

    culianryman

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    Hi my name is Rick and this is my first Threaded Post I think I am going to enjoy this web site a lot.

    I have been invited to participate in the SOS (Share Our Strength) event here in Toledo Ohio. I have decided to do something wild and I hope it works.

    Wild Boar with Porcini Ravioli served with a Roasted Pear and Red Wine Vinaigrette.

    A Brief Description:
    Pan Grilled Porcini Ravioli filled with mascarpone cheese, marinated figs and roasted garlic. This will be presented (topped) with a nice slice of Peppery Wild Boar, garnished with micro herbs and pea shoots then lightly moistened with the pear dressing. All of this will be served and prepared tableside and in a very small well presented portion.

    My question is about the Wild Boar can this be served Rare? Or dose it have to be cooked through. If it cannot be served rare then I will select Elk or Moose.

    CulinaryMan
     
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    If the boar is truly wild then you need to treat it like the way we treated pork in the old days. Cook it till at least 170F... at least. You may experience some toughness if you don't cook it long enough. Maybe some kind of wild boar confit... yeah :)

    Kuan
     
  3. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Kuan, I have never cooked wild boar to well done. Always MR. I was told that trichinosis was not a problem in Wild Boar, because of its dining habits. Have I been lead astray? I thought trich, was a problem because farmers used to feed their pigs slop (aka garbage) and that is how they got the trich. In the wild, boars would be foraging, and shouldn't come in contact with it. Or is that totally wrong?
     
  4. culianryman

    culianryman

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    I found this in my search and unfortunately it supports both views. I have emailed my game provider and hope to have some closer on this soon. I will let you all know my findings.

    Rick

    Trichinosis
    (TRICK-a-NO-sis)


    What is Trichinosis?
    Trichinosis, also called trichinellosis (TRICK-a-NELL-o-sis), is caused by eating raw or undercooked pork and wild game products infected with the larvae of a species of worm called Trichinella. Infection occurs worldwide, but is most common in areas where raw or undercooked pork, such as ham or sausage, is eaten.

    What are the symptoms of a trichinosis infection?
    Nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue, fever, and abdominal discomfort are the first symptoms of trichinosis. Headaches, fevers, chills, cough, eye swelling, aching joints and muscle pains, itchy skin, diarrhea, or constipation follow the first symptoms. If the infection is heavy, patients may experience difficulty coordinating movements, and have heart and breathing problems. In severe cases, death can occur.

    For mild to moderate infections, most symptoms subside within a few months. Fatigue, weakness, and diarrhea may last for months.

    How soon after infection will symptoms appear?
    Abdominal symptoms can occur 1-2 days after infection. Further symptoms usually start 2-8 weeks after eating contaminated meat. Symptoms may range from very mild to severe and relate to the number of infectious worms consumed in meat. Often, mild cases of trichinosis are never specifically diagnosed and are assumed to be the flu or other common illnesses.

    How does infection occur in humans and animals?
    When a human or animal eats meat that contains infective Trichinella cysts, the acid in the stomach dissolves the hard covering of the cyst and releases the worms. The worms pass into the small intestine and, in 1-2 days, become mature. After mating, adult females lay eggs. Eggs develop into immature worms, travel through the arteries, and are transported to muscles. Within the muscles, the worms curl into a ball and encyst (become enclosed in a capsule). Infection occurs when these encysted worms are consumed in meat.

    Am I at risk for trichinosis?
    If you eat raw or undercooked meats, particularly pork, bear, wild feline (such as a cougar), fox, dog, wolf, horse, seal, or walrus, you are at risk for trichinosis.

    Can I spread trichinosis to others?
    No. Infection can only occur by eating raw or undercooked meat containing Trichinella worms.

    What should I do if I think I have trichinosis?
    See your health care provider who can order tests and treat symptoms of trichinosis infection. If you have eaten raw or undercooked meat, you should tell your health care provider.

    How is trichinosis infection diagnosed?
    A blood test or muscle biopsy can show if you have trichinosis.

    How is trichinosis infection treated?
    Several safe and effective prescription drugs are available to treat trichinosis. Treatment should begin as soon as possible and the decision to treat is based upon symptoms, exposure to raw or undercooked meat, and laboratory test results.

    Is trichinosis common in the United States?
    Infection was once very common; however, infection is now relatively rare. From 1991-1996, an annual average of 38 cases per year were reported. The number of cases has decreased because of legislation prohibiting the feeding of raw meat garbage to hogs, commercial and home freezing of pork, and the public awareness of the danger of eating raw or undercooked pork products. Cases are less commonly associated with pork products and more often associated with eating raw or undercooked wild game meats.

    How can I prevent trichinosis?
    Cook meat products until the juices run clear or to an internal temperature of 170 o F.

    Freeze pork less than 6 inches thick for 20 days at 5 o F to kill any worms.

    Cook wild game meat thoroughly. Freezing wild game meats, unlike freezing pork products, even for long periods of time, may not effectively kill all worms.

    Cook all meat fed to pigs or other wild animals.

    Do not allow hogs to eat uncooked carcasses of other animals, including rats, which may be infected with trichinosis.

    Clean meat grinders thoroughly if you prepare your own ground meats.

    Curing (salting), drying, smoking, or microwaving meat does not consistently kill infective worms.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    What I have read is that trichinosis cysts are destroyed at 137 degrees. The 170 is the lawyers talking.

    Phil
     
  6. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Bruce Aidell in his 'Meat' cookbook recommended cooking wild boar to 160 degrees.

    Another thing to consider if you are going to cook it med. rare - will people eat it not well done, knowing that it's a pork product? Most people I know are still in the 'I'm afraid to eat pork that hasn't been cooked to well done' category. Will it turn them off even tho you want to prepare it med. rare?
     
  7. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Don't know.....go with another meat and play with boar...the only experience I've had with it was tough adn gamey razorback my Mom cooked 30 years ago.
    I do have a friend with french restaurants that braises it.
    Pan Grilled?????What is that?
    Sounds like a blast...love the raviloi idea.Are you getting your greens locally? there is a cool farmer in Ohio that is raising innovative gorgeous shtuff....chef's Garden.
     
  8. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Okay you all have me confused, I gotta check up on this. I think the fear infection from undercooked boar comes from not knowing where the beast has been.

    Kuan
     
  9. marmalady

    marmalady

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    kuan, The point I was trying to make was regardless of if and what chance there is of contamination, what do you think your customer's reaction is going to be to rare boar? I just think most folks would get a little hinky, and unless you're willing to go in there with some educational materials, all your work may be left on the plate.

    Check out these folks- they have a recipe for med.rare boar chops:

    http://www.hogwild.ab.ca/recipes.htm
     
  10. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Oh yeah, think about the stigma still attached to pork cooked medium :) Wild boar? I think not! :)

    Kuan
     
  11. culianryman

    culianryman

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    Well my new friends, I have talked to one of the farmers of this product. They raise the Wild Boars on a free range and are inoculated and inspected periodically as they mature for market. There is no risk of trichinosis because of this. They do however recommend medium to medium rare for the finished temperature. The tenderloin has an extremely beefy profile and can actually be used in many of the same dishes as beef.

    I am in agreement with Marmalady (aka The Chile Queen) that the overall perception may be a little bit risky for public approval.

    I have decided to use an Elk Loin. I am going to marinate this in a cooked red wine hunter style preparation, then to heighten the game flavor of the Elk I will air dry it with a light Kosher salt and hardy black pepper rub for a few days. A mild pecan wood smoke to firm the loin should produce a nice carpachio style presentation. It should rock with the other items for this Wild Appetizer.

    I will shoot a picture and publish my finished recipe on my web site (under massive construction) for you all to try or critique.

    Thank you,

    Rick
    CulinaryMan
     
  12. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Sounds yummy, Culinary Man - suggestion - why don't you throw some juniper berries in with your dry rub?
     
  13. culianryman

    culianryman

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    Juniper berries are always welcome when dealing with most game especially the stronger flavored varieties and yet I wonder.. mmm.. Scratches head. Eureka!! What do you think of maybe a finely ground anise berry and maybe a light brushing of sticky maple syrup reduction to the Elk Loin prior the dry rub. I am thinking this combination sounds new and shall I share in the term "Cutting Edge".

    Its late now and this is the time the dark side of my brain begins to play and for some reason I am thinking of drying a few vanilla beans and adding them to the smoking process. (What do you think)?

    This web site is so cool!!
    CulinaryMan
     
  14. marmalady

    marmalady

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    CG - Anise BERRIES? Anise seed, I've got - where do you get the berries?
     
  15. culianryman

    culianryman

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    I had juniper berries on my mind last night and meant to say seed although I believe that a full Star Anise is a pod since each branch of the star is a seed.

    I also mentioned in the original post a term " Pan Grilled " well it is simply this, Calphalon has a heavy gage sauté pan that has a grooved bottom so you can Pan Grill on your stove at home.

    Little scallops that need fine lines for presentation, little sate's and so forth. I find this pan very nice to use when doing tableside demos.

    Well off to work now "Hi Ho Hi Ho" Short day today I hope. I will get into gear for this weekend on Thursday over 1000 people for friday and perhaps as many as 1800 to 2000 on Saturday.

    Isnt Catering just the bomb?

    "Chefy you are not in the Ritz any more"


    Yours Allways
    CateringMan<<<< Too Funny!! (Kenya AA in the morning should be Illegal)

    CulinaryMan
    [​IMG]