Wich POLISHING stone should I buy ?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by luis j, Nov 1, 2011.

  1. luis j

    luis j

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    I guys...

    I was a very happy guy with my chef's choice 130 and/or crappy stones that I used to buy on the flea market to sharpen my knives, after that I got "serius" with a Minosharp 1000 grit stone and I tought that it was the coolest thing on earth... Until I started reading you all and I realized that I was on diapers on this knives & sharpening stuff... Since then, my personal finances are going on a downward spiral and seems like it's getting worst by the hour... But at the same time I'm happier with my sharpening skills, so, I'm not blaming anybody for this new adiction.

    Most of you know already my background and my current gear...

    Mac Mighty knife.

    Oishi 1000/6000 whetstone.

    Stone holder.

    Idanone "fine" (1200) ceramic rod

    Nagura stone

    Now I'm ordering a 1200 Bester stone.

    Tojiro ITK Shirogami Wa-Gyuto 210mm  Because I want to have some experience with a carbon knife (That's just like a project that I'm not caring too much about the outcome, is more a curiosity, so, I'm not getting deep on that, it's just too see how do I feel with a carbon knife, and if I like it, soon I'll get a  serious wa gyuto... But we'll open that can of worms in another ocasion)

    My question is... Wich polishing stone to buy?

    Here are the nominees:

    Naniwa 8000 1Cm w/base (or 10,000 maybe) ?

    Shapton glassStone 8000 ?

    Kitayama 8000 ?

    Naniwa snow white 8000?

    All your feedback will be very appreciated.

    Thanks in advance!

    Luis/img/vbsmilies/smilies/peace.gif
     
  2. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Wow, CKtG got more of the Tojiro Shirogami in!  I got one of the first batch and I think you'll be blown away!  It's mind boggling how good the knife is for the price.  It would be exceptional at twice the price.  You can get a "serious" knife if you want but I doubt it will cut better than this little Tojiro!  The only thing to complain about is the cheap handle and plastic bolster, but for $50 complaining about it would just make you a curmudgeon.  You could put a new handle on it and tell your buddies it was $150 and no one would blink an eye.  Fresh off my Yaninosha & Hideriyama Renge Suita it would put cut a Wal-Mart bag over an inch out.

    I haven't used the Kitayama so I can't help you there, but the other three are good stones.  The GS is faster and a better cutter than most but feels a bit "hard."  I love the Snow White, and it's not outrageously expensive.

    Do you have other carbon knives at all?  If you do (or maybe even if you don't) you might wanna consider this one:  http://www.chefknivestogo.com/hinako.html  I've found it works well on stainless and extremely well on HC.
     
  3. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Last edited: Nov 1, 2011
  4. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    8K is overkill for a MAC Pro in a professional kitchen.  It won't hold the polish for long, and certainly not after the first time you use your rod.

    The Kitayama is an incredible stone.  It leaves a slick, misty finish; but in my experience it's not easy to get it unless you use the Kitayama in tandem with something almost as fine or a little finer.

    I really like the Pure White.  If you've decided to go after a real polish, it would be a great choice. 

    The high grit Naniwa SS are very soft, soft to the point of being problematic.  I've lived with both the 8K and the 10K; and while they both work exceptionally well they're both such pains I can't recommend them. 

    Mark's generic 10K magnesia stone is another great stone.  Phaedrus is right.  Between it and the Naniwa Pure White, I'd get whichever's cheapest. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2011
  5. luis j

    luis j

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    Thanks for your valuable info guys...

    I had no idea that 8000 was too much for a Mac, but if that's the case, wich one will be the best finishing stone for it. Am I fine with my 6000 Oishi? I'll like to get the very best of my knife.

    And Phaedrus, yes, the Tojiro is back in stock and I want to order it very soon along with the new stones, the comments on the knife are very good and is not costing an arm and a leg, actually very affordable for the kind of fedback that is going on.

    And BDL, by the "Pure white" you mean the "snow white"? 

    Best regards.

    Luis
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Jyunpaku translates as "snow white" or "pure white," no biggie.   

    I like the Takenoko, which is 6K, but an overachieveing 6k.  Take it with a grain of salt, because I don't even have one.  I usually finishing my carbon Sabatiers with an 8K Naniwa SS (worn out, needs to be replaced, probably with a Gesshin 8K), so don't let my use of the word "overkill" frighten you. 

    Fool around with this stuff Luis.  You're not going to hurt anything but your checking account by going too high.  And when you lose your beautiful 8 or 10K mirror polish by going to your rod it's not a problem, at least you had that edge for a while.  Just put it back on next time you sharpen.  You'll get a sense of what works for you and what doesn't.  The good news is that a polishing stone isn't going to put much wear on your edge. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Nov 2, 2011
  7. luis j

    luis j

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    Thanks for the info, it has been very helpfull.../img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif.

    I took a look on the takenoko http://www.chefknivestogo.com/takenoko8000.html and I liked it, a bit more affordable than the snow white and according to your comments and the reviews on CKTG it's some kind of 6000 on steroids that polish like an 8000. I'll give it  try, maybe I'll get better results with the bester 1200 and takenoko 6000 than the ones that I'm getting with the oishi 1000/6000. Just like you said, I have to experiment to see how it works. I can't complain of my actual gear but this new combo may be a good step upward.

    And now that we got into the subject... Instead of using the honing rod, I'm using the 6000 stone and just stropping, so far has been a good practice and the knife gets his sharpness back perfectly (But I don't let it get dull, by the time that I'm stropping, the knife has still a decent sharp edge) is that a healthy practice for the knife?, or is better to work with the knife until it "needs" to be fully sharpened because the rod is not helping the cause anymore.

    Thanks a lot!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/peace.gif
     
  8. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Man, the Tojiro in Shirogami is already sold out!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/surprised.gif   150 knives in one freakin' day!  He's got another 150 coming in but not for a few weeks.   I'm glad I got mine already.  I'm anxious for the same thing in a 240mm.
     
  9. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    About an hour ago I sharpened a Ken Onion Shun chef's knife for a coworker.  I don't normally use my Japanese naturals on VG-10, but for kicks I used a natural Aoto followed by my Jyunsyouhonyama (from CKtG), and as always the results were terrific.  It finishes somewhere in the ballpark of 8k-10k give or take but leaves the edge a bit "bitey".  It's really nice if you work it awhile tog some slurry.  This is a really nice finishing stone for $50 IMOHO.
     
  10. luis j

    luis j

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    Thanks for the advice Phaedrus... Now that I'm not in a rush anymore (The Tojiros sold out!!!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/frown.gif  ) I'm going to take a loook on that Jyunsyouhonyama and some more stuff.

    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
     
  11. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Turns out CKtG only got 24 of the Tojiros.  The next batch will be 150 of the 210mm gyutos...but they won't be in for 3 weeks./img/vbsmilies/smilies/laser.gif

    Stone wise there's lots of good stuff out there!  Take your time and sort thru what's available. 
     
  12. pohaku

    pohaku

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    And of course, everyone on this forum has now arranged for CKtG to e-mail them when they come in.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
    Last edited: Nov 3, 2011
  13. lennyd

    lennyd

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    Luis I think you will like the 6K as I know I was impressed with mine.

    It does not seem to be too soft, and is much less rigid and offers a better feeling than the glass stone (I have a shapton 2K).

    What I really like is that if you are sort on time you can just use it normally and get a good result, but if you like you can work up some mud and then finish off with a really light pressure and get it polishes even higher.

    I have no experience with the others so can not offer any comparison.
     
  14. lennyd

    lennyd

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    Funny because I was on the fence (as usual lol) but after finally deciding this would be a great way to experiment with carbon steel only to find it sold out when finally went to pull the trigger :)

    Mark must be a happy man with having so many sold before they arrive!
     
  15. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    The next one he's bringing to market is the same knife in a 240mm version.  It will be mine- oh yes, it will be mine.../img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  16. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Lots of competent folks doing it lots of different ways, but I don't like just stropping to true, unless it's (a) on a very fine stone or other material, (b) done with light pressure, and (c) the knife is deburred as necessary.  Stropping tends to pull a wire.  That said, the rules for truing -- fine surface, very light pressure, flipping sides with every strokes, as few strokes as necessary -- don't change from rod to stone.  If your stone's out, wet, and otherwise ready to go... why not?

    Not a paragon by any means, but when I true on a stone it's with an edge leading/spine trailing stroke to avoid the wire thing. 

    Don't hesitate to use a rod with your MAC.  You'll find your edges last longer and with a lot less work.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2011
  17. luis j

    luis j

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    That makes two of us! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif  But for sure nex time I get the e-mail I'll buy it on the spot, and also I got in the list for the 24 inches! Lets see how many he gets and how long the supply lasts! Best regards... and the Arashimaya 6000 is on the way! let's see how it works!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
     
  18. luis j

    luis j

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    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif  I didn't know that stropping was a potential way to get pull the wire... I'll be extra carefull, and from now on, I'll use more my honing rod! Thanks for the imput, I appreciate it very much BDL !
     
  19. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    Everything in the sharpening arsenal has its place at some point.

    I had 4 knives with stubborn wires. 3 Macs and a Chicago Cutlery. Looked under the 200X scope to confirm what I felt and then stropped them off on my chromium oxide charged strop. I was doing some straight razors anyhow so gave it a try on the knives. About 8 strokes all total and they were golden.

    Jim
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2011
  20. luis j

    luis j

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    Sounds cool Jim, thanks for the advice, I'll give it a try! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif