Why so much heat for a few lousy peppers?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by heymroscar, Apr 1, 2014.

  1. heymroscar

    heymroscar

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    I recently heard that some folks are steaming peppers after they have been roasted.  Can anyone tell me what this brings to the party? How does it affect the flavor?  I'll wait here....../img/vbsmilies/smilies/lookaround.gif
     
  2. mike9

    mike9

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    Once my peppers are roasted over a fie I put them in a pot with a lid.  Steaming loosens the skins for easier removal no extra heat required.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2014
  3. heymroscar

    heymroscar

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    I do the same thing.  I'm talking about steaming them for up to seven minutes.
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    Maybe they were talking about dry peppers, and how to rehydrate them? 
     
  5. ordo

    ordo

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    If you oven roast the peppers they will come out soft. If you roast them over the stove ( a much quicker procedure), they will be somewhat stiff. May be they want them softer steaming the peppers after stove roasting.
     
  6. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    @heymroscar  when you say steamed, do you mean after the whole peppers are fire roasted they are then put into a steamer for up to seven minutes?
     
  7. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    When I roast peppers, either over the stove or on the grill, I always put them in a bowl and wrap them tight with plastic wrap.  This effectively "steams" them, but it is a gentle heat that softens them and cooks them just a bit, making it easier to peel them.  I won't ever put them into the steamer after roasting.  The high pressure and constant movement of the steam would wash away a lot of the flavor that you worked so hard to achieve.
     
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    that's exactly what I was thinking Pete, as if you washed them in the tap.  After taking the time to char the skins and impart some lovely smokiness, why do that?  My MIL would not have approved.
     
  9. french fries

    french fries

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    My grandmother left a few recipes that are held in VERY HIGH esteem in our family. Unfortunately there are very little directions. One thing she wrote explicitly for each recipe that involve roasting and removing the skins of red bell peppers was "do not rinse the bell peppers or all the taste will go away". That stuck with me to this day. 
     
  10. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    When I was a young, new cook I once rinsed the peppers as I was peeling them.  I thought the chef was going to stab me.  Never made that mistake again!!!
     
  11. heymroscar

    heymroscar

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    So, I'm watching this show on pbs where they are roasting peppers in these big barrels.  They are talking about the process and talking about the food that they are eating and enjoying, when one guy mentions that fact that he roast the peppers first, then lets them sit in the open air, then steams them in a steamer for 7 to 8 minutes.  And I think, What??  What is the point of that?  So, I decided to share.  That's all I got folks.  Thanks.
     
  12. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I think they are simply talking about a very well known technique of blackening the skin over an open fire (gas, blow torch, any open fire) and then put them in a bowl covered with cling film. The remaining heat and steam in the bowl will loosen the blackened skin and make it easy to remove. The blackening makes the peppers taste smoky. It's also a good idea to leave some bits of the black skins on, to emphasis the smoky flavor. And as already said, never rinse the peppers after they have been peeled, it will remove that smoky flavor.

    p.s. blackening doesn't have the same purpose as roasting them, the only purpose of blackening is to remove the skin.
     
    Last edited: Apr 3, 2014
  13. michaelga

    michaelga

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    It might be a good idea for you to realize that what you see on TV (pbs or not) is not likely to represent reality! 

    I'd follow Chris's advice many times over before following what you saw on the TV.