Why isn't it Mayo?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by rick alan, Jun 22, 2013.

  1. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I tried making mayonaze just an hour ago and all I got was cloudy oil, no thickening in other words.

    The ingredients were:

    1 large egg yoke

    1 cup oil

    1 tsp sugar

    1 tsp fresh lemon juice

    1 tsp vinegar

    pinch salt and some pepper

    some lemon zest

    Whirred this on high in a blender, so what went wrong?

    Rick
     
  2. bughut

    bughut

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    Hi Rick, 

    When making mayo, the oil should be added at the end, a bit at a time as you whisk...To start with, just a few drops and as you continually whisk, you can let it flow a bit stronger. just keep whisking... If you're using a machine, blend everything but the oil then drizzle it in with the machine going constantly It'll work fine now.

    Personally i prefer to make it by hand. its one of those things that just is often nicer that way, unless of course youre under time restraints at work, but even then, its a good thing to do when you have 5 minutes are in the mood.

    If the recipe is a bit gloopy at the end, you can add a bit of water to loosen it

    Good luck

    PS  dont use all olive oil. I made that mistake once and F&^*d up a romantic fruit de mer for our anniversary.It was nasty...had to fall back on Hellman's
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2013
  3. antilope

    antilope

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    deleted.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  4. iceman

    iceman

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    OK.   There's an idea.  NO problemmo.  Everyone does have an  immersion/stick blender right?   
     
  5. antilope

    antilope

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    deleted.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2013
  6. michaelga

    michaelga

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    With that list of ingredients i'd have to ask what are you emulsifying ?

    You have all fats and some flavour?

    Try this :
    • 1 large egg yolk
    • 1 tablespoon water
    • 1 tablespoon lemon juice (from 1/2 a lemon)
    • 1 teaspoon dijon mustard
    • 1 cup vegetable or canola oil


    blend the hell out of it. add salt to taste.
     
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Oh well I did dump all the oil in at once so I guess that explains it,

    Could have bought a stick blender fro $5 at the local discount chianstore but didn't cause I thought I'd never use it,

    Since this was specifically for a lobster salad I did not want to over flavor it with mustard and such, but I did want the consistency extra-heavy.

    Thanks for the help, will try again.

    Rick
     
  8. helloitslucas

    helloitslucas

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    Do it by hand. It doesn't take that much time. :)
     
  9. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Absolutely true, an immersion blender plunged in a narrow container like the one delivered with the immersion blender makes mayo in 10 seconds!

    It can also be done in a blender like Rick Alan used.

    What you had to do, Rick;

    - Always use a whole egg, yes, including the white,  when using electric devices. When whisked by hand use only the yolk.

    - you forgot the mustard that helps the binding. Use plain Dijon mustard.

    - when using an immesion blender; add all ingredients to the container, first put the blender at the bottom of the container before switching the blender on. Then switch on but leave the blender at the bottom of the container for a few seconds (until it starts to bind at the bottom). Then move the immersion blender gently upward. As said; 10 seconds for a perfect compact white mayo!

    Another tip; use tarragon vinegar, so delicious. Dump the sugar and lemon zeste.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2013
  10. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    All emulsions need to be started properly.  If you don't start it well the whole thing is lost.

    Use one egg yolk and an equal amount of mustard to start.  Mix that together well with a fork.   Switch to a whisk.  Add the oil a few drops at a time. The one you have about a Tablespoon started you can start drizzling a little faster.  Once you get a good amount going you can drizzle the oil down the side of the mixing bowl, then using what you have in the bowl already "grab" the oil a bit at a time from the side of the mixing bowl.
     
  11. french fries

    french fries

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    Just wanted to add that I've also done this a few times, and it works great, especially if you want a really thick mayo, for example to spread on sandwiches. You do indeed end up with a perfect mayo in under 10 seconds.

    Still I just make mayo by hand, in a bowl, with a fork. I can't be bothered taking the immersion blender out of the closet... and honestly I like taking my time, I enjoy the process, I don't mind it taking 60 seconds instead of 10. 

    I also agree with the advice to dump the sugar. Mayo doesn't need sugar. 
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2013
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Well after buying the IB and letting this sit for a while I finally got around to trying things again, and even though it is mayo this time it did not come out quite as thick as regular Hellmans. So perhaps the thick'n easy additive is the way for me to go as there is only so much experimenting I care to do given a particular span of time. As always thanx for all the input, but Antilope, why on earth did you delete your comment's, especially as I wound up using your advice?

    Rick
     
  13. rick alan

    rick alan

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    All right so like I indicated I finally made some mayo this past long-weekend with the IB:

    one cup oil
    1/2tsp alt
    1tsp Dijon
    1tbs apple cider vinegar (no off-flavor created)
    1 whole extra-large egg

    and yesterday I actually used it and....

    Very nice egg flavor you don't get with off the shelf (I suppose with just the yolk this would not be so). Intuitively I did not S+P the tomatoes on my turkey sandwich first try, but when I did add S+P interestingly it overpowered the eggs.

    It in fact did not need sugar

    Hellmans sorry, but you just lost a customer

    Rick
     
  14. french fries

    french fries

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    More power to you Rick! Awesome! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif  From now on, no need to go to the store for mayo, no need to stock jars, just ... make it when you need it, as you would a vinaigrette!
     
  15. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Nice. :)  I've never used an immersion blender.  Did you start drizzling in the oil slow and speed up as it went along?
     
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The neat thing is you just dump everything in at once using any tall narrow and preferably round vessel, like the one that usually comes with the IB.  The small cup-shaped end that houses the rotor essentially separates the egg et al at the bottom from the rest of the oil so the mixture there behaves the same as if there actually were just a bit of oil.  In a few seconds you see the emulsion form there, then you just slowly draw the mixer up threw the rest of the oil.  It is in fact just as the others here have said.  I used the high setting until it cavitated at the top, then switch to low to finish.

    Rick
     
  17. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I'm following up here just to say, "Desired Results Achieved!"

    Whole large egg goes into narrow jar along with the usual suspects (I did use a bit more than 1 cup oil)

    Tilt jar slightly to get the egg all in one place to fit within the skirt of the stick blender.

    Hold there and wiz until you see the emulsion is not traveling upwards any further, then draw the SB up to finish the rest.

    Once it sets up in the fridge the resultant is a very firm paste, I mean beautiful thick as you could just about ever want it.

    Keep recommended liquid ratios but I encourage other newbies here to experiment with varying amounts of mustard, vinegar/water/lemon juice percentages, etc, to suite various applications. 

    2 tsp Dijon, tbs each water and vinegar and 1/2tsp salt had just the zest for sliced turkey, pepper could have been considered.  Tarragon vinegar would be great for chicken I'd guess.  Thinking about what I'll do for lobster as I am just feeling that kick coming on again.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2014