Why is vaseline used to coat champagne biscuit molds?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by monk, Apr 26, 2011.

  1. monk

    monk

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    Why does the recipe for champagne biscuits in "The French Cookie Book" use vaseline to coat the molds?  The idea doesn't appeal to me for health concerns - is there a 'safer' substitute?  Was the point of using vaseline purely for the different surface texture?
     
  2. panini

    panini

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    Monk,

       LOL.  I have to believe he is referring to fat.

    Malapropisms are frequent when recipes are translated to english. Sometimes they can be pretty funny.

    Depending on your recipe, the buscuits can sometime be difficult to remove. When you remove from oven and they start to stick half way through removing, pop them back in for a minute.

    The Italians call cream cheese- Philidelphia

    panini
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2011
  3. monk

    monk

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    Thanks very much Panini - I was clueless after many online searches!
     
  4. siduri

    siduri

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    Just for the record, I usually try to buy organic raisins (sultanas, which is unfortunately all they have here) because the others are usually coated in, yes, VASELINE.  some are coated in vegetable oil, but some vaseline.  It's not a bad translation in this case, anyway, because the raisins are italian, and in italian vaseline is called vaseline. 
     
  5. panini

    panini

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    Monk,

      Don't use the vaseline. Use any type of pan release.  This vaseline story has been around for years. You just happened

    to pick up a French Cookie book where the author talks about using vaseline as a release. I think it even says to apply liberally.

    This is just not a common thing in France and you won't find a reference to using it in almost all cookbooks. I have a rather extensive collection of French Pastry books and I would bet a cup of coffee the word vaseline is in any of them.. He either ran out of fat or it was mistranslated.

      Vaseline is not good for you. My wife and I have been through many bouts with cancer. There are studies that have found that the process of making patroleum jelly produces carcinogens that can cause Breast Cancer.

    pan says pam/img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Try Vegelene not Vaseline. First one is edible and was the original release spray.
     
  7. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    1.  I don't believe that Bruce Healy's book is a translation.

    2.  On page 466 he discusses the use of Vaseline: petroleum jelly.  It is intended to give the product a more finished look than use of fats.

    3 (and, perhaps, most importantly)  I'd concur with the suggestions to use a pan coating spray, like Bak-Klene or something similar, instead of petroleum jelly.  I can ony imagine that Vaseline would taste nasty, especially if it is the type that is "scented/flavored" to make the baby's bottom smell nice.