Why is red wine said to be supposed to be served ''at room temperature''?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by slayertplsko, Mar 26, 2016.

  1. midlife

    midlife

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    I'm new here, so I may not understand the nuances of communication on these boards. Your response doesn't at all seem to respond to the reply I wrote, and which you quote.

    I enjoy communication with others about wine on other sites, but I must say this brief exchange with you has been a bit frustrating. I don't know which one of us is missing something but you've been here longer so I'll give you the benefit of the doubt. I just wish I knew how/where this went astray.

    I'll refrain from further comment so as not to keep this topic from getting even farther off it's original subject.

    Cheers!
     
  2. oetzi

    oetzi

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    I will jump in with my 2 cents.

    I think the implied message is that reds are not to be refrigerated.  Its more a message to the masses, one of those "rules of thumb" that is used to give a broad reference point.

    As pointed out earlier, more people than you would think plop a couple of ice cubes in any red wine they drink.  Usually preceded by the statement that they prefer white wine.

    I can't get on my high horse due to the fact that I like to drink a nice reisling  with a couple of ice cubes when its hot out and enjoying a seat on the front porch. :)
     
  3. midlife

    midlife

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    But good wine storage dictates keeping reds somewhere in the high 50 degree range. Isn't that "refrigerated"? On the other hand I work for someone who's been in the wine business 40+ years. While I will refrigerate leftover reds he won't. He VacuVins them and leaves them out in a place that's around 70 degrees. His thought is that raising and lowering the temp by 35-40 degrees (fridge to that room) is harder on the wine than staying in the 70s. The difference may be that I'm drinking half a bottle, refrigerating under Argon, then finishing the bottle in a few days (so the temp swing occurs once) while he's keeping the wines for service in a wine bar, so the swing may occur several times over several days.
     
  4. rndmchef

    rndmchef

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    If your refrigerator is 50 or higher, your food is spoiled.
    40 degrees and your food would be spoiled.

    For all intents and purposes, temperature danger zone is 40-140. As everyone here should know..
     
  5. midlife

    midlife

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    Wine storage units, as I said, are generally set between somewhere 55 and 60 degrees Fahrenheit. I put the word "refrigerated" in quotes intentionally. I'm not talking about food, I'm talking about wine. If I put a half-drunk bottle of wine in a food refrigerator (as I will overnight) it IS at something in the mid 30degree range. What am I not understanding?
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2016
  6. ietinker

    ietinker

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    Midlife, I saw your note you're new here so a quick primer - posters here will argue minutiae ad nauseum.  Sometimes it's interesting, most times it gets off topic, as this thread quickly has.  At some point it's best to just let it go. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/peace.gif  
     
  7. midlife

    midlife

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    IETinker, I've been known to argue minutiae ad naseum but it's usually easier when the replies make sense to me. Conversation generally requires understanding in both directions. I'm quickly losing whatever interest led me here.
     
    Last edited: Apr 1, 2016
  8. fablesable

    fablesable

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    Sticking to what the OT was talking and asking.........I believe it IS a matter of interpretation of the meaning behind the language. To "server chambre" actually correctly interpreted means "to let it stay in warm room for a few hours before serving, so it takes slowly room temperature". Another common place interpretation is "take the temperature of the room where one is staying".

    The definition used for "chambrer" is "place a bottle of wine in temperature ambient to taste" which it then gives the synonym: warm and the English translation: to bring to room temperature. We can clearly see here that the English translation of 'to bring to room temperature' is a poor substitution for the real meaning of 'placing a bottle of wine in temperature ambient to taste'.

    The French definition of "chambre" is "the room in which we can sleep" which takes us back to the times where one did not take wine in a proper dining setting but rather in the rooms one stayed in which happened to be where they were sleeping as well. So I agree that it harkens back to a time all of our technology and mis-interpretations had yet to exist. Also, as it still has the old world meaning and bad English translation behind it, we now understand that back in those days it was bloody cold where they stored their wares and the rooms only barely were better by the fires they lit to keep people somewhat warm. So the ambient temperature would not be above 15-18 degrees celsius AT MOST and the wine drunk for the majority of folk was pisswater to say the least......temperature be damned.

    Over the years with our technology as well as education of mind and palate we have the better knowledge to know the who, what, when, where and how we would like our wines. It is an INDIVIDUAL taste that ultimately determines whether a wine should be at "so and so temperature" when serving. Some like it warm and some like it cold........to argue this is folly as you are not them and they you. To say it MUST be something (proper temperature) because "they" (whoever is making the rules at this point) say it to be so is just funny because there are over 7 billion people on this planet with all those tastebuds playing out........I am sure we will find a way to change the definitions of everything again as we go.

    So I like the French translation of "servir chambre" and "chambrer" as they seem to dictate a personal preference rather than a hard and fast rule. Salut!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif  

    @Steve TPHC   'A great oenologist insures that the grapes are picked at their prime even if that means they may be required to be picked vine-by-vine let alone row-by-row. The operation may extend over the course of days or even weeks. This is a strictly hand operation so only small vineyards can afford this attention to detail. The hand operation means the wine is made without  caterpillars, green grapes, or beetles.'

    I believe what you are meaning here is a great viticulturist NOT oenologist. As oenology is strictly the study of wine and wine-making NOT the growing and harvesting of grapes for wine.....that is viticulture.

    As well just a note, tannins are determined on the vine not over the time it is aged in a barrel. This is also the job of a well trained viticulturist to be able to determine this by tasting the grape before harvest. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2016