Why is my hummus not perfect.

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Joined Jul 30, 2020
Okay, first things first.

This is my first post here and I'm no professional chef. In fact, my occupation is the furthest thing from anything culinary (I run an auto accessory shop). But I love cooking, watching new recipe videos and trying out new things, and in most cases, they do turn out to be quite delicious.

But it's been about 2 months and 6 unsuccessful attempts of making hummus and I still can't my head around the fact that I'm not able to ace it. I tried everything. Lemon juice, Soaking overnight + Boiling, Using ICE, a bit of sugar, peel off the skins from the chickpeas. All of it. But I couldn't nail it.

I watched a video of Chef John cooking it and I watched a few youtube videos of a middle eastern cooking show host share some tips. That's just about it. Here are the links Link1, Link2, I followed all of the tips but somehow, it simply isn't as good as the one I order.

Any of you guys have any suggestions?
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
I just always used canned chick peas with a little of the brine, some seasoning, oil of your choosing and tahini pulsed in a food processor. Always came out fine for me, could you specify more what the problem is?
 
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Joined Aug 15, 2003
You need to say what’s wrong with yours before we can do much to help you.

It’s a bit odd you’re having so much trouble. Hummus is one of those things that is very easy to make and one of those dishes that the difference between homemade and commercial is obvious.

If you’re cooking your own chickpeas, adding a touch of baking soda to the cooking liquid will make them very soft so they blend better (no graininess), and that can improve the texture.

If your hummus simply lacks flavor or depth it’s most likely a seasoning issue, and you could try more garlic, lemon juice, olive oil, tahini, etc
 
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There is no such thing as "Perfection". There's only "adjustments" and "compromise" to get what you're after.
 
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Sugar in hummus? No, no, no.

Personally I don't enjoy the taste of canned chickpeas, I use dried chickpeas that I cook thoroughly (best to use a pressure cooker if you have one).

Peeling all chickpeas carefully is key to a smooth texture in your hummus. Take your time and don't forget any of those pesky skins. It's a labor of love, and patience is required.

Chickpeas — Garlic — Tahini — Fresh lemon juice — Salt — Olive Oil

Blend thoroughly. Take your time. Add warm water as needed to reach the desired smooth creamy texture.

If that doesn't work... what's the problem exactly?
 
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Joined Jul 30, 2020
Oh! My bad, I didn't even mention what was wrong with mine.

For one, Where I stay (India), stores don't stock canned chickpeas at all. Everyone uses only fresh ones.

So I soak it for a couple of days in a pot of water and then boil it.

the issue is that mine still feels kind of raw -the seasoning is perfect but for some reason it just isn't as good as we get in the restaurants.

On a good note though, it keeps getting better each time I try it :)
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
If it is a texture thing it sounds like you need to address cooking methods of the chick peas, not the whole hummus dish itself.
 
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Joined Jul 30, 2020
Yep, Looks like it.

I'm going to try something radical this time ...... pressurecook them.

Will keep you guys posted/
 
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Joined Jul 29, 2020
Pressure cooking is the way to go if you have one, boiling can take way too long. The blender you use can make a big difference. If you have a powerful enough blender you don't need to peel chickpeas. It can turn out as smooth as silk if you throw enough watts at it. Also add enough water or the cooking liquid before blending . Your blender can easily overheat if you don't . Cheap blenders can burn out as well. Don't forget to add liquid and check for your blender heating up. If it makes funny sounds or does'nt blend well, add more liquid too.
 
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Joined Aug 15, 2003
I'm telling you, add a bit of baking soda to the beans as they cook. This will help create a creamy texture once you puree.
 
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Joined Jul 29, 2020
I'm telling you, add a bit of baking soda to the beans as they cook. This will help create a creamy texture once you puree.
That would work too fer sure but isn't that kinda cheating ? like how asian takeaways use bicarb as a tenderizer on tough cuts? ;)
 
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There’s no such thing as cheating in that situation. Look at it as “insurance”.
 
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Joined Jul 29, 2020
LOL!!!!!!!!!!
I'll just chuck some in my Bourguignon too, call it insurance as well.
Don't mind me, I am just stirring the pot.
 
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That would work too fer sure but isn't that kinda cheating ? like how asian takeaways use bicarb as a tenderizer on tough cuts? ;)

LOL!!!!!!!!!!
I'll just chuck some in my Bourguignon too, call it insurance as well.
Don't mind me, I am just stirring the pot.
Explain to me how it would be cheating? There is a chemical reason to do this--adding baking soda raises the pH of the water, creating an alkaline solution which will, in turn, weaken the tough skins of the chickpea and break down the pectin, allowing for an easier, smoother blend.

I don't know what you think comparing "asian takeaways" and Bourguignon accomplishes, but cooks in Asia and China have been velveting meat for generations, so unless you somehow look down on Asian food compared to classical French food like a snob I'm not sure what point you're trying to prove.

I mean, is it OK with you if I use baking soda in my muffins, or pancakes? Or is it cheating if I don't use a starter?

Get outta here with that trash.
 
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WWJD? (Julia)

She'd add butter. If you don't like or have any butter ... use cream.





"We work in kitchens. ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
 
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Joined Jul 29, 2020
Explain to me how it would be cheating? There is a chemical reason to do this--adding baking soda raises the pH of the water, creating an alkaline solution which will, in turn, weaken the tough skins of the chickpea and break down the pectin, allowing for an easier, smoother blend.

I don't know what you think comparing "asian takeaways" and Bourguignon accomplishes, but cooks in Asia and China have been velveting meat for generations, so unless you somehow look down on Asian food compared to classical French food like a snob I'm not sure what point you're trying to prove.

I mean, is it OK with you if I use baking soda in my muffins, or pancakes? Or is it cheating if I don't use a starter?

Get outta here with that trash.
Looks like I stirred the pot well.
TBH Mr someday, I dont really think of It as cheating. My comment was in jest . I have used soda bicarb in the past with meats because it was the only way to do what needed to be done at the time.

I have prepared hummus of exceptional quality enough of times to know it not required- always in a PC. The OP has a pressure cooker and he can turn his chickpeas into baby food in less time it that takes to boil the stuff - probably without even bothering to pre soak. Given that, Is there ANY point at all in adding soda??

I dont use bicarb in food unnecessarily if it is not required. Nor I expect do you.
If I didnt have a PC, adding soda is a damn good idea. Thank you for sharing it.
If im going to add it into the PC, I might as well to the Bourguignon



I'm telling you, add a bit of baking soda to the beans as they cook. This will help create a creamy texture once you puree.
Heard you the first time.
I always thought there was more than one way to skin a cat
 
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