Why is my creme brulee very runny and loose? What can I do?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by wwebb37, Apr 20, 2012.

  1. wwebb37

    wwebb37

    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Culinary Student
    I made a creme brulee and it is very runny and loose. I made it in a large ramekin, and my oven is set at 300 F and there are also bubbles at the top. Ive been cooking it for over 50 min now, but the recipe told me to cook for 30 min.
     
  2. siduri

    siduri

    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    42
    Exp:
    At home cook
    We can't help much without a recipe.  Have you ever made it from this recipe before?  what size ramekin do they call for?  if it;s a bigger one you used, that would account for it not cooking, because it takes time for the heat to get to the center.  But the recipe itself might not be good, many recipes are posted around internet and they;re just made up or they're not tested or the measures are wrong - typos or just estimated by eye. 
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,726
    Likes Received:
    329
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Because you didn't use hot water in the water bath?
     
  4. chefbuba

    chefbuba

    Messages:
    2,211
    Likes Received:
    473
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Are there enough eggs in your recipe?
     
  5. ouroboros

    ouroboros

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    they need to be allowed to cool completely before they are properly set... also quickly and decisively use a blow torch to "burn off" the bubbles before you pop them in the oven....
     
  6. margcata

    margcata Banned

    Messages:
    985
    Likes Received:
    13
    Exp:
    Food Writer
    Good Morning,

    A possibility why your Crème Brulee is too wet is that you have added too much milk or used a diet formatted milk like low fat, or used too many eggs, or used the whites as only yolks are used. Other possibilities are the temperature of cooling or did not use sieve twice.

    This recipe has been in existence since 1520 and here is the traditional recipe for  Créme Brulee ( Burnt Cream ) :

    4 cups whole regular milk

    2 five cm. cinammon sticks

    2 five inch strips lemon zest

    1 1/4 cups or 8 ounces of sugar

    6 egg yolks

    1/2 cup corn starch

    A salamandre = a metal disk that acts as an branding iron or Metal Spatula

    Clay ovenware earthenware dishes

    Recipe:

    1) dissolve the corn starch in 8 fl. oz. of milk.

    2) heat the rest of the milk in deep sauce pan with the 2 cinammon sticks & the zest and do not boil.

    3) blend the 6 egg yolks with 8 ounces of sugar

    4) strain the simmered heated milk through a fine sieve and pour over egg mixture

    5) add the dissolved corn starch mixutre and blend well and heat gently stirring in one direction

    6) do not allow to boil

    7) when the mixture thickens, remove from heat and strain through sieve again

    8) let it cool completely

    9) when cool, heat up the salamandre or metal spatula

    10) sprinkle the sugar over the custard and caramelize with the metal salamandre or spatula to form a thin caramel layer

    *** For final ramekin ( souffle dishes ) placing and caramelizing; please send me a note.

    Have a nice wkend.

    Margaux Cintrano.

    ( Margcata ).
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2012
  7. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Possibly add 1 or 2 more yolks only to your mix, and are you useing a pan of water in oven to put the individual dishes in. This helps set the custard.
     
  8. siduri

    siduri

    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    42
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Without Wwebbs recipe, there is not much we can do but speculate.  We don't even know if he (she) made the recipe before and it worked, or if it's a new recipe.  There are so many recipes online that are just off the top of someone's head... and they don't work. 
     
  9. cookers

    cookers

    Messages:
    152
    Likes Received:
    14
    Exp:
    Can't boil water
    Just a tip. Never use a whisk when making creme's. You don't want to create air bubbles. Use a spatula instead. 
     
  10. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,726
    Likes Received:
    329
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Margcata we're talking Creme Brulee right?  Creme Brulee is made with cream, sugar, egg yolks, and vanilla.  It is cooked in the oven, in ramekins placed in a bain marie.
     
  11. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    158
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Margcata,

    Did I read correctly, "boiled milk"?

    I've always used a recipe along the lines of what Kuan posted.
     
  12. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,173
    Likes Received:
    302
    Exp:
    At home cook
    ... and half a cup corn starch? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif
     
  13. petemccracken

    petemccracken

    Messages:
    3,401
    Likes Received:
    158
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Never should have looked again!
    • 2 five inch strips lemon zest ???
     
  14. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

    Messages:
    8,551
    Likes Received:
    193
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    WWebb,

    Please post your recipe.  We can't say what you've done wrong until we know what you've done.

    One possibility:  Cremes won't hold if they get wet.  Splashing water into the ramekins from the bain marie when filling it or carrying the whole shebang to the oven are common errors.  In an abundance of caution I don't fill the bain marie until it's already on the oven shelf. 

    Also, as already said, cremes should be set (by chilling in the fridge), before making the brulee.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2012
  15. titomike

    titomike

    Messages:
    294
    Likes Received:
    15
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Pete has pointed out the importance of ratios before & referred to a great book... for brulees I use 1 yolk to 100mls cream...fills a 125ml ramekin.

    A French pastry Chef I have great respect for has had me ditch the bain marie in favour of a cool oven 50-80 C .....works fine. Your looking for the jelly wobble in the centre ...the rest is in the chilling.

    Not a fan of the stove top method (Anglais styles) some people use as I reckon it gives a grainier, less silky texture possibly from not catching the excess whites along for the ride? 
     
  16. chefross

    chefross

    Messages:
    2,677
    Likes Received:
    348
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    This sounds more like Coer d La Creme......
     
  17. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

    Messages:
    3,207
    Likes Received:
    155
    Exp:
    Private Chef
    For those that don't know why a bain marie is used ,its to insulate the custard from direct heat and to keep the eggs from cooking too fast, which may cause them to separate.

    If you have a convection oven then a bain marie won't be needed because of even circulation of the air insulates the custard from direct heat.

    The ingredients I use are simple and basic.: 4 cups heavy cream, 1 Large egg, 6 egg yolks, 1 vanilla bean, white sugar .

    For  the top: Brown sugar which  has been spread on a sheet pan to dry out. (remove moisture)

    1) scald the cream

    2) when working with the eggs and sugar, mix them very quickly into the cream (you don't want them to cook)

    3) use a sieve to pass the liquid to remove any particles.

    4) make sure the ramekins are filled to top as they will lose volume as they bake

    5) topping: use 2 Tablespoons of the brown sugar- making sure the custard is fully covered - not too thin or too thick

    6)  I always let them to sit 12-24hr in the fridge to get the best texture and taste.

    The nicest one I made was with Grand Marnier & orange zest

    These are some of my thoughts.

    Petals.

    ps. ChefRoss, what a wonderful dessert , I believe coeur a la creme has cheese ....
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2012
  18. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    6,726
    Likes Received:
    329
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    That must be a mistake.  I don't believe cornstarch was around in 1520.
     
  19. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

    Messages:
    3,207
    Likes Received:
    155
    Exp:
    Private Chef
  20. french fries

    french fries

    Messages:
    5,173
    Likes Received:
    302
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Urghh.... does it work for you petals? I have tried using convection for creme brulee and I find my results are much, much better when I turn it OFF! So ever since I've always left it off when making creme brulee. I do put the ramekins in a pan of water.