Why Does It Sink?

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Joined Jul 28, 2001
@coderzm

Hi and welcome to ChefTalk. Your question is very broad and there can be quite a few reasons sinking happens. I'll try to list descending from the most common down. Oven temperature is important. Calibrate your oven using an oven thermometer inside, instead of the oven dial. Under baking sponge is common. Don't over beat air into mixture. If using a leavener, make sure it's fresh. Sift your flour. Try to use a cake flour which is lighter then APF. All ingredients should be at least room temp. Eggs can even be a little warm. Don't grease pans. Let's see? oh, altitude can also be a factor.

I'm going to take a look at the formula.

That sponge looks tricky. Are you using glucose? Karo, not the same. Ribboning is usually done over a double boiler? It's easy to over fold batter the way it's described. I definitely would not tap sponge pans on the counter before baking. HTH's a little
 
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Joined May 18, 2015
Hi @phatch

Nope i didnt substitute anything at all.

@panini  thanks for your help! I think i'll try using an oven thermometer. I've honestly tried following the recipe to a tee.

Yup am using glucose, and nope I didn't ribbon the mixture over a double boiler. Does that help?

Thanks for your help, hopefully it works the next time round!
 
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Joined Sep 9, 2012
To me the method seems wrong. Traditionally for a sponge the egg whites are folded in last as to not lose their lift. Assuming that the cake pictures were made using this method, could you be under baking yours? Once thoroughly baked the air in the batter should be encapsulated and stable.
 
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Joined May 5, 2010
To me the method seems wrong. Traditionally for a sponge the egg whites are folded in last as to not lose their lift. Assuming that the cake pictures were made using this method, could you be under baking yours? Once thoroughly baked the air in the batter should be encapsulated and stable.
This technique seems more like a Genoise in nature because you beat the whole egg with the sugar and glucose.

What I have a problem with this recipe is folding the flour in stages, rather than all at once at the end. I've made this many times. My problem was the same as yours and I had a dense layer of dough at the bottom each time I made it.

I figured out how to fold all the flour in at the end and keep it light enough. 

Ovens vary and what the recipe reads may be a guideline and you'll have to experiment with your oven and temperatures to make it work for you.
 
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There was a  "Japanese" sponge roll recipe making the rounds a few years back.

Used this technique/techniques and I made it 4 times before giving up from sheer frustration.

The whole beating into submission idea was that as the top half with the flour would sink thru the rest (undisturbed by the spatula) and become homogenous without developing gluten.

Or something like that lol (been awhile and my memory is not getting better with age ;-)

If you can get this batter down, the finished product will deliver a nirvana-esque texture of liqht fluffy moist sponge.

Not too sweet and almost melts on the tongue.

mimi
 
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Joined Jul 28, 2001
@coderzm

 Japanese people make and like western style desserts. Like @Chefross  says, the sponge most often used for these type of desserts is usually along the lines of a genoise or victoria sponge. Any of these sponges will work for the dessert.

If you ribbon the eggs and sugar I would do it over a double boiler. Basically your goal is to whip volume into the eggs and sugar until they turn pale and almost triple in size.Then it's just a matter of folding in the flour, usually in three parts. Folding in by hand gently with a spatula. Some then may drizzle melted butter or some milk to finish.

You cant sift the flour too much. at least 2 times to rid the lumps when folding.

Sometime people  confuse Japonaise, which is a meringue style baked good. or Daquois
 

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