Why do some manufacturers include small holes in the lids of their pots & pans??

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by woosterguy, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. woosterguy

    woosterguy

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    Maybe this is a silly question, but I've recently been looking around for a nonstick "everyday" type pan.  I've settled on the design of the classic saute pan(straight sides, fairly deep).  The one the looks most interesting to me is the T-Fal "Signature" 10-inch anodized saute pan.  T-Fal pans have glass lids, which is ok with me, but they also have a small steam hole in them.  Now, why would anyone want to add steam to the oven, or to an already-hot kitchen??  Or, is the amount of steam released so small that it can be ignored?  I'm asking because I've never used a pan that has this type of lid.......any suggestions, comments etc?  Thanks in advance.
     
  2. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Hi Woosterguy,

    I would be guessing if you have any liquid in the pan, such as wine or stock, then the steam hole is to stop the lid jumping up and down when it comes to a boil.  It would save you from having to leave the lid off a bit to one side.  My parents have set of pans of all sizes like this, and they are their favourite ones.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010