Whole lobster

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by rpooley, Feb 8, 2017.

  1. rpooley

    rpooley

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    So, Valentine's Day is coming up, which in our house means "The St. Valentine's Day Massacre"  a.k.a. cooked whole lobster.

    We usually steam it with lots of garlic butter, pasta and a simple green like asparagus or broccoli.

    I was curious what some folks favorite whole lobster recipes might be?  Especially any broiling favorites?

    We always buy live and the lobsters are dispatched on premises, either boiling water or knife split.

    Feel the love.
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    This is my way-  Split them in half down the middle with a heavy cleaver.  Helps if they are in the freezer 10-15 min to make them sluggish.  They will squirm...   Grill on indirect heat to get them cooked like 90% done.  Brush on some miso butter or whatever compound butter you like,   grill hard direct to get some color.

     
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  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Maybe my favorite way to do lobster now is to reduce lobster stock in a wok for sauce add some aromatics and some fermented goodness like miso.   Crazy how fast you can reduce stock in a wok

     
  4. rpooley

    rpooley

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    @MillionsKnives   Nice!  What's your favorite usage for the roe/tomalley in another dish if you don't eat it with the lobster?

    Stuck with the broiler.  No grill.  :(

    I've done Jasper White's pan roasted lobster but haven't quite found a broiled whole recipe.  I have no problem splitting.  Did 14 grilled lobsters for a family barbecue once.

    The only thing about broiling is that I always feel the tail is either overcooked or the claws underdone.  I guess some dismembering is going to be the rule.

     
     
  5. rpooley

    rpooley

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    Does anyone here do a knife kill to the head before boiling/steaming?  I've read it helps the meat stay a little more tender and probably is more humane.
     
  6. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Yes, I even go so far as to rub them behind their head before using the knife. Might sound silly, but it actually helps to calm them down and lull them into a calm state.

    I learned this years ago when I worked at a place with a live lobster tank in the entrance by the hostess stand. Needless to say I have transported a fair amount of live lobsters across a crowded dining room in my day.

    I believe that meat that is calm, as opposed to stressed, before the final act, makes for a more tender result. It also helps me to feel that I am being more humane and respectful of the gift, I believe that being respectful of the gift is translated through the cooking process and shows up in the final product.

    My karmic input for the day :~)
     
  7. jake t buds

    jake t buds

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    Yes. Kill quickly as possible and humanely before dropping into a vat of boiling water. I know I'd like it that way. . . 

    Agree with cheflayne in regard to karma and tenderness, as well.

    Its the way we should feel about any other living being we've sacrificed for our sustenance. 
     
  8. rpooley

    rpooley

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    I totally get the karmic input.  I read a chef who once said it was important for even "non-cooks" (whatever that means) to make lobster once in a while, to remember what they are spared everytime they eat animal that someone else has prepared.

    I explain to the kids how important it is to be as respectful and humane as possible, and to use as much of the animal as possible.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2017
  9. rpooley

    rpooley

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    Something I hadn't thought of - when you kill the lobster with a knife, should the liquid be saved for the stock?
     
  10. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Thread's a bit old, but...

    yes. Save it.

    Incidentally, for broiled whole: blanch or steam the whole lobsters just until the flesh firms and pulls away from the shell, but leaving the interior raw. Split the lobsters lengthwise (saving the juice etc. of course). Do whatever you're going to do for stuffing -- bread, butter, herbs, whatever -- then broil until the top is sizzling, and it'll be just done and moist.
     
  11. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    While we're on the subject, I wonder what people think of this.

    I was considering doing broiled lobsters with an herb butter. To make the butter, I thought I'd put butter, lots of chervil, some tarragon and parsley, a little white wine, and a little miso into a processor. Adjust salt as necessary.

    I am thinking of using white (Saikyo) miso, which to me has a very faintly vanilla taste; I know vanilla goes well with lobster, and I think it also goes well with anise flavors such as chervil and tarragon.

    Opinions?

    (Trick is, I'm serving this to my mother-in-law, who has Celiac and cannot get anywhere near gluten products.)
     
  12. rpooley

    rpooley

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    I think as long as the vanilla taste is faint.  No one wants lobster ice cream.
     
  13. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    S
    Speak for yourself!! 😜