Who Was It? and why?

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by cape chef, Mar 30, 2002.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

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    I know in the past we have discussed who we were influened by on the savory side of the coin.

    I would love to here from our pastry brigade whom they consider their role models, both past and present.
    What were the things that these people did or do that catch your attention?

    Of course, it does not neccersarly need to be a proffesinal pastry chef, it could have been your mother or father.

    For me personaly, it was my grandfather who owned a few bakerys, and Albert Kumman that really stirred my juices.

    So who is it for you folks? And why?
    Thanks
    CC
     
  2. momoreg

    momoreg

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    One chef that was an inspiration to me in culinary school continues to be one of the most expert chefs I've had the pleasure of learning from. His name is Jean Luc Derron (Mbrown probably remembers him), and he does excellent work with sugar, especially, but also has a perfectionist's palate. I see his work at competitions, and I'm always impressed. It's in the same league as E. Notter. Now there is a chef that I've never met, but I'm always inspired by.

    As a bread baker, Silverton is somebody whose books I have learned a lot from. Her style is straightforward and uncomplicated.

    There are so many pastry chefs out there who have influenced my own work, in terms of using and complimenting flavors, textures, etc... I don't think I can mention only one or two.
     
  3. m brown

    m brown

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    pastry chef michel keller. bread man rj coppage.
    all around pastry gods lars johhannson and albert kumin. jaques torres. george higgins, first chef to explain that there is no blue food!

    that episode of sesame street at the bakery.:bounce:
     
  4. thebighat

    thebighat

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    I never had Derron at J&W, but his stuff was incredible. A true artist. Never had Johannson either and only saw him working once. Struck me as an irascible old sob. He might not be, for all I know. First chef I ever worked for was a guy named Bill Lalor, and he taught me technique and attitude, both of which really stuck.
     
  5. angrychef

    angrychef

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    Helmut, a German baker/pastry chef that showed me his creative mind and spirit selflessly. He's in his 70's and still working the day away making specialty cakes.
    I do like Emily Luchetti and Nancy Silverton ---their simple, tasty and elegant style influence me.
     
  6. chrose

    chrose

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    Been awhile since I saw this column so I'll add my 2 grams. Other than the love of sweets as I was growing up I suppose I was most influenced by Chef Haller formerly of The White House who was a neighbor as I was growing up and was always bringing home fine desserts to his kids who didn't want them so much. PAst that when I was in school I apparently had a bit of a knack for making breads and pastries and was fascinated by a friend Dwayne Alberico who had learned pulled sugar when he was younger. When I moved back to MAryland my mother showed me an article about E. Notter who was just a few miles away from where I lived and I became involved in the little Swiss group in the area. Lest we forget though Collette Peters and Roland Winbeckler and even some of the amazing amateur decorators in places such as "The Mailbox News"
     
  7. w.debord

    w.debord

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    My biggest influence came from my Mother who is a professional chef.

    Role models, people I admire.....it's a huge list and about every other day I can add someones name to the list. Since I haven't been forunate enough to have trained undersome dirrectly in person I've trained under everyone that ever wrote a baking book that I've read. So my list is only consists of published pastry chefs, which is embarassingly limited.

    Most amazed by and would probably faint if I saw them in person: M. Roux, P. Herme, J. Bellouet, J. Childs, J Peppin, J. Beard. Why? Each one would be worthy of a novels worth of praises.

    Others on my list that I adore and think are brilliant with contributions that were major: M.Stewart (she completely changed wedding cake design in the US, imho!), Roland Windbeckler (for showing us possiblities), Mrs. Fields (for showing us cookies aren't something only kids like and should value), M. Deslauniers (for teaching me books are maps to be used and I don't have to follow them strictly), Bo Frieberg (for an amazing amount of work, who gives us guidance and enourmous amounts of reference), P. Reinhart (same reasons as Frieberg).
     
  8. pastrychef_den

    pastrychef_den

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    This is a nice thread. It's been some time since I last posted.

    I have a couple of role models that I would like to list...

    En-Ming Hsu: for sharing her talent and knowledge of beautiful pastries as well as discipline in the workfield.

    Dan Budd: for being such a good example and for helping me to take the opportunity to work with good pastry chefs...

    Noble Masi: for teaching all the basics that I need to know about bread baking and cake making.

    I don't mind learning more about breads from Richard Coppedge and Carvel(sp?)...