Who I saw your favourite chef?

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50
Joined Mar 3, 2016
doesnt need to be celebrity chef, but might be
Doesn't need to be world-renowned, although might be
It might be Larousse, because of his work
It might be your mum or gran
It could even be you

Discuss.
(Mine is Clare Smyth - just love her and would kill to work with her!)
 
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543
Joined Aug 15, 2003
I've always been partial to Thomas Keller. I think he's probably the first American born chef to receive the international accolades and respect that was missing from American fine dining for so long. He set (and continues) a standard so high that it's trickle down effect is still being felt today. There are probably things that happen in your kitchen that are due to him that many won't even realize.

There are honestly too many to list though...I'll do a few.

I really like David Kinch at Manresa...his aesthetic and approach to food are both amazing and to be emulated.

Corey Lee (TK alumnus) does some really cool things in San Francisco.

I think that Grant Achatz is amazing (another TK alumnus), though I'm personally not a big fan of his food, his style and approach to cooking and artistry is pretty amazing. His restaurant is more performance art than eating sometimes, but I think it's cool that people like him are pushing boundaries and challenging pre-conceptions of dining and food. Also, props to him for overcoming tongue cancer and that whole ordeal...couldn't have been easy.
 
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1,018
Joined Aug 21, 2004
I have to second Thomas Keller. The man has no pretensions, no hidden agendas, what you see is what you get. Just pure dedication to his craft.
 
169
50
Joined Mar 3, 2016
I've always been partial to Thomas Keller. I think he's probably the first American born chef to receive the international accolades and respect that was missing from American fine dining for so long. He set (and continues) a standard so high that it's trickle down effect is still being felt today. There are probably things that happen in your kitchen that are due to him that many won't even realize.

There are honestly too many to list though...I'll do a few.

I really like David Kinch at Manresa...his aesthetic and approach to food are both amazing and to be emulated.

Corey Lee (TK alumnus) does some really cool things in San Francisco.

I think that Grant Achatz is amazing (another TK alumnus), though I'm personally not a big fan of his food, his style and approach to cooking and artistry is pretty amazing. His restaurant is more performance art than eating sometimes, but I think it's cool that people like him are pushing boundaries and challenging pre-conceptions of dining and food. Also, props to him for overcoming tongue cancer and that whole ordeal...couldn't have been easy.

There is a (unfounded) belief outside of the US that all you guys eat is ably demonstrated on Guy Fieri programs. Same as everyone believes that dining in the U.K. must involve stodgy, old world food.
Simply not true.
I, personally, don't understand the American penchant for massive portions, nor the culture for salad, soup, entree. And can someone please explain what "refills" means? Are they free or paid for?
In Australia, we have generally smaller portions unless you are going to low quality places where obscene portions rule.
Put it this way-a friend from America recently sent me pictures of a meal he very much enjoyed. The plate (should I say, platter) involved fried chicken, ribs, coleslaw, fries, baked potato, burger buns and, umm, fruit salad - all on the same plate!
Gross.
And he happily told me that he ate the whole thing and got some fast food on the way home!

I'm sure we have such things happen here in Australia, but I think that there is a trend toward finer dining here. Nowadays, all the restaurants are aiming very high down here- fine dining is being pushed out because even the lower end venues are offering very high end food. You can eat amazing food in poorly decorated dumps.

Anyway, got off-topic, I'm off to bid for that brass railing from EMP
 
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