White pan bread with starter

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by angrychef, Apr 28, 2003.

  1. angrychef

    angrychef

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    Would it be advisable to use a starter in a pan bread formula, or is it better to stick with a poolish or biga? Along the lines of 40-50%? Is there a way of converting any straight dough bread formulas to ones using starters?
     
  2. thebighat

    thebighat

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    I would use sponge and dough method. 60%. Or you could use pate fermentee and add the enrichments into the dough. What's white pan bread? 100% flour, 60% h2o plus or minus, 2.5-3% salt, 3% yeast (fresh) 5% sugar, 2.5% dried milk powder, 5% butter or shortening...something like that. Make the sponge with 60% of the water, flour, and yeast and all of the sugar, milk, butter. ferment for three hours or so, and then make the dough with the remaining flour, water, yeast and salt. It only needs to sit for 25 minutes now, and then straight to dividing, rounding, resting and shaping. I think it makes for a more supple dough, well-hydrated.
     
  3. angrychef

    angrychef

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    Well, I tried it out Crust and Crumb's recipe replacing the biga with 50% starter and adjusting water, etc. Came out great, best sandwhich bread we've ever had. Took about 2 hrs. fermentation with .70% instant yeast.
     
  4. thebighat

    thebighat

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    Bigas, poolish, sponges, they're all referred to as starters.What exactly did you use?
     
  5. angrychef

    angrychef

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    My sourdough starter which I started about 2 months ago.
     
  6. flash

    flash

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    I remember this pizza place i worked at. GREAT dough, a sort of combination: we did straight dough, but with a chef (you know, day old, pate fermente ) usually half a recipe of "old dough" from the night before mixed with a full recipe (depending on the ammount you need for the day)

    1/3 Chef
    2/3 Straight

    once the starter develops and becomes more flavorful, this works out perfect for making good sandwich rolls and pizza dough (nothing compared to Artisan type breads, but better than Subway......

    ;)flash