whisky samplers

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Joined Jun 27, 2012
The pain mgmt doc has given me the go ahead to indulge once or twice per week.
It has been over a decade since anything but a stolen sip of wine/beer has passed my lips and this renewed interest in whisky has given me quite a craving.
New brands everywhere and I have no clue where to even start.
This is where the sample packs come in... but there are sooo many sites and I am confused where to start.
Anyone out there want to lend the girl a hand?

mimi
 

pete

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If you want to sample some really good, higher end whisky/whiskey you can't do any better than checking out the Masters of Malt website. You can purchase samples individually but can also purchase taster sets. They aren't cheap but it is a good source and have quite a catalog. Do you have a preference as to what kind of whiskey you prefer: Scotch, Irish, Bourbon, American, Canadian, Rye, etc?
 
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Hey flipflopgirl!

Consider finding a whiskey bar. They may be able to match your taste preferences to whiskey and would have a large selection to choose from. I'm sure it would be expensive (bar prices) but it may be worth it to talk with someone that really knows their whiskey and how to match it to your taste buds.

Just a thought...
 
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here is a you-tube channel devoted to whiskey tasting https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCElm866_W5r1eg8VjhFNARw there is plenty of good tasting bourbon for $30 or less. I like the Heaven Hill family, Evan Williams White(<$20), Elijah Craig(<$30), Henry McKenna Single Barrel Bonded(<$35) are personal choices. Wild Turkey and Jim Bean are also in this price group. you drink these straight like you would drink good brandy.
Scotch has become very expensive. a basic blended will start at $20.
If you know an owner, maybe you can arrange a tasting for a flat rate during a quiet time. get 1/2 shots of 4 or 5 flavors and see what you like. again, this is for drinking straight. if mixing with coke or 7-Up, any $10 whiskey will work. Bourbon seems to be very regional, don't know if the brands I recommended are for sale near you.
 
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4,474
421
Joined Jun 27, 2012
Thanks for all the great advice ya'll!
P pete I cut my teeth on blended scotch (Cutty and Dewars) which is now way too sweet on my palate.
One of the SILs slid me a couple fingers of one of his "new" top shelf single malts (has it really been more than a decade?) that I remember to be so smooth and rich that I could make it last for a couple hours if I had to.
Key words here I will have to lol.
American whiskey?
Jim Beam has been there for me all my adult life but am open to suggestions.

mimi
 
4,474
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
Pulling the trigger on a couple of the sample packages....at the rate I am able to consume it may be awhile before I can report back.
Thanks to everyone for the hand holding lol.

mimi
 

pete

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Staff member
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Joined Oct 7, 2001
Pulling the trigger on a couple of the sample packages....at the rate I am able to consume it may be awhile before I can report back.
Thanks to everyone for the hand holding lol.

mimi
Where are you getting them from?
 
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Joined Apr 11, 2018
Thanks for all the great advice ya'll!
P pete I cut my teeth on blended scotch (Cutty and Dewars) which is now way too sweet on my palate.
One of the SILs slid me a couple fingers of one of his "new" top shelf single malts (has it really been more than a decade?) that I remember to be so smooth and rich that I could make it last for a couple hours if I had to.
Key words here I will have to lol.
American whiskey?
Jim Beam has been there for me all my adult life but am open to suggestions.

mimi

If Scotch blends are too sweet for you then I doubt you'll take to American stuff, which is typically at least 51% corn and IMO sweeter than Scotch.

It's a bit pricy but you might want to try Lagavulin 16. It's an Islay single malt with strong peat and some brine influences. Complex and quite a bit different than those blends you're experienced with.
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
Took your advice re MofM and stuck with them, P pete .
Sooo much info to decode and then try to relate to my palate "muscle memory".
Got with a SIL and we both had a great time mixing a custom order of Scotch and Bourbon and Cognac.
2 of each and even splurged for a couple of the rarities to share.
Pretty sure the card I used melted down at checkout lol.
I am a happy camper....thanks again.

mimi
 

pete

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You like road trips? Here is one that is fun and you get a free T shirt. https://kybourbontrail.com/ On your way stop in Tennessee and visit https://www.jackdaniels.com/en-us https://www.georgedickel.com/distillery-tour-information. Do you know why Jack Daniels comes is a square bottle? So it won't roll out from under the seat when you get stopped by the sheriff.
The Bourbon Trail is on my bucket list of things to do in the next few years!!!

One thing I forgot to mention, but I'm not sure how much it affects Scotch as I am not that familiar so I will use Bourbon as an example. One thing I try to do, when I am introducing people to Bourbon is to start easy-meaning keeping the proof of the Bourbon low. As much as I would love to share some of my favorite Bourbons, I don't because they are barrel proof (cask strength) with proofs ranging from 112-120+. Proofs this high would blow out people's palates if they aren't used to them, and possibly give them a bad experience. So I start newbies with lower proofs- under 100 or more likely in the 80-90 proof. If they are really new to Bourbon I would probably start them off with something on the lighter side, flavor wise, also, like wheated Bourbons. Same would be true for Scotch also. I don't know if they bottle Scotches at high proof sometimes like Bourbon but I would stay away from higher proofs. I would probably also stay away from heavily peated Scotches unless you know for sure you like the powerful flavors that come with peated Scotches.
 
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Joined Jun 15, 2021
Whenever I hear about someone who has so significantly increased their net worth by investing in rare whiskey, I can't help but gape in amazement. On the surface, it seems crazy that anyone with a net worth north of $100 million could possibly desire such a pricey substance. Yet somehow, these rich folks have found a way to turn $2,500 into $16,000 or more by investing in rare whiskey. You can read about such experiences on https://www.newbondstreetpawnbrokers.com/blog/whisky-investment-guide-2020/. Also, you will find their great tips if you want to start investing in rare whiskey.
 
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