Which Japanese chefs knive?

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To many knives and the opinions are not that easy to find. Which are the top brands and knives ? My budget is around 250 euro/dollar for a gyuto/chefs knive . 

Knives who got my attention:

Kai Shun Premier Tim Malzer

Mcusta Zanmai Classic PRO knives

But I'm not sure if there are better knives available for the same price..
 
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Where are you located? This could affect pricing via shipping and customs depending on where you are and which retailers you're looking at.

Do you have any specific preferences? Handle, steel type, profile, etc.?
 
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Im living in Holland. We also have this shop in Holland : http://www.japansemessen.nl/c-2812014/gesorteerd-op-merk/ 

Language is in dutch but now you can see the brands who are available there

Dont have any special preferences. Handle should be made from wood or at least not from steel. And the knive should be similar in use then the western knives. Not that I need to learn myself a whole new cutting technique /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
 
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Not that I need to learn myself a whole new cutting technique /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
This is a joke but you have stumbled onto something accidentally perhaps.  Even among chef knife shapes there are subtle differences.  Pretty much all japanese knives are for push or pull cuts.  No rock chopping.  If you're uncomfortable with that, stick with german.
 
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Hey welcome to cheftalk.

There are some J's that have a slight up-tic at the heel to facilitate rocking, like the Takamura.  And, well, this little uptic can be ground in, but not recommended for the novice sharpener.  But for about $25US you can find J-knife sharpeners to do it, if you really had to have it.  But even a Sabatier can rock without it, for the occasion you might want to mince some herbs or something.

Anyway, you can also look at JapaneseNaturalStones in your neck of the woods, JapaneseChefKnives also.

But the 2 knives you mentioned are 2 I would not consider.

And the inevitable question, "How do you intend to sharpen these?"
 
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Joined Jul 22, 2016
 
Hey welcome to cheftalk.

There are some J's that have a slight up-tic at the heel to facilitate rocking, like the Takamura.  And, well, this little uptic can be ground in, but not recommended for the novice sharpener.  But for about $25US you can find J-knife sharpeners to do it, if you really had to have it.  But even a Sabatier can rock without it, for the occasion you might want to mince some herbs or something.

Anyway, you can also look at JapaneseNaturalStones in your neck of the woods, JapaneseChefKnives also.

But the 2 knives you mentioned are 2 I would not consider.

And the inevitable question, "How do you intend to sharpen these?"
To sharpen those knives I like to use wetstones and diamond knive sharpeners. So which brands do you recommend? 
 
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Joined Jul 22, 2016
Any thoughts on the Kanehiro AS ?

I saw Shapton makes good quality wetstone/glasstones. What is a good grit to maintain the quality of the knive? 2000? Or is it adviced to buy multiple stones the first time?
 
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Not hard to take a step up from there.  Just curious what you mean by "diamond sharpeners."
 
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Not hard to take a step up from there.  Just curious what you mean by "diamond sharpeners."
Couldnt find the correct translation for it. But I mean the sharpening steels with that kind of diamond powder/coating

The reviews of the Kanehiro 240mm AS are pretty sick.. Hope there is someone who is active on this forum who have some experience with that knive

So what kind of sharpening tools/stones should I buy with it?

That Zwilling was my first knive, still love it :) Very nice starter and I will never forget her haha
 
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The splash-and-go Chosera stones already recommended are all you need.  You can save the diamond steel, so long as it lasts anyways, for convenience since you'll likely continue to use the Zwillings for brutish tasks, but don't even think about using it on your new knives, it removes way too much metal and otherwise damages the edge of a good knife.

Don't use any steel, with the exception of a ceramic steel.  A few strops on a fine stone is actually far superior to the CS though, as Benuser finally convinced all of us here, so you don't even need the CS.

The Kanehiro sounds like a nice lighter middleweight gyuto, it doesn't have anywhere near the belly of a German knife but it will rock-chop well.  Food release should be very good.
 
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Take reviews from
chefknivestogoforum.com
with a grain of salt.
It where customer/buyer reviews at the site /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif

And why could it be thickened behind the edge? I'm willing to learn. I know how to cut and cook but never get into this kind of information haha. But t is becoming an interest for me. 
 
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chefknivestogoforum has loyalty contests, giveaways for good reviewers,   free stuff for video reviewers, and paid video reviewers.   I have never seen one of their video guys give a bad review on anything.  Unbiased review does not exist there.  IMO they prey on unsuspecting cooks making their first foray into japanese knives.  Some of what they sell is okay but god forbid you get a defect.  You have to pay return shipping + 15% restocking fee.   Definitely stay away from any house knives with the name Richmond on them.
 
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Shun japanese knives .... any reviews...look beautiful! and also the Yoshihiro Gyuto Knives? 
 
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In the world of japanese knives, Shun is just average entry level.  But they charge premium prices.  What they may have over others is branding and english speaking customer service.  

Yoshihiro as i understand is based in Los Angeles.  They're a knife company that contracts various craftsmen for their knives.  Some of these shared with other vendors. 

I really think you should buy from a more local vendor or one that ships direct from Japan, because you will get hit with taxes, import, and VAT.  
 
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Masakage line of knives I think are sold by a UK vendor. They tend to have some level of bling aesthetic. 

Japanesechefsknife.com should be a pretty good vendor option considering your location. Their offerings are largely solid, just depends on what you want.
 
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Joined Jul 22, 2016
Ordered my knife monday and within 2 days it was in house :) It is a Gesshin Uraku from JKI because Jon gave me good advice about what I should do. Decided to go with an entry level Japanese knife so I could learn more about how to use them before I finally buy a top notch knife. Don't want to chip my knives due to sharpening skills haha.

1 question. Sharpening the knife on a whetstone and then use a honing steel to maintain the edge or should I use higher grit stones to maintain the edge instead of using a steel? I think a whetstone will remove to much steel. Opinions?
 
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