Which Culinary/ Pastry/Baking Schools in Canada, France, Switzerland?

Discussion in 'Choosing A Culinary School' started by vagabundo, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. arevalo

    arevalo

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    Culinary Student
    Dear Nat Osman.

    I read you comment about you not getting into Ferrandi because your age, I'm older than you. I went to Ferrandi last June for the training weeks. Your age is not a factor of getting or not into a school. Do what ever you want to do and don't let your age getting in your way.

    Best regards,  
     
    nat osman likes this.
  2. nat osman

    nat osman

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    Can't boil water
    Hey khurram, you are right it was silly of me to point it out to them, 😂 But they did confirm with me that they prefer younger students ... I'll have to copy paste what that woman wrote it was hilarious - but anyhow it wasn't meant to be and I'm actually not a negative person and I definitely do not feel 'old' but it's just how they went about it - very unprofessional! And yes at the end of the day it's all just about the 💲. I am doing a combination of a few different things now , the LCB pastry diploma starting January followed by Bellouet conseil for 12 weeks and then after a short break bread at ENSP - wish me luck - it's going to be a crazy year ahead but I'm ready!
    Thank you for your wonderful comforting encouraging words - :)
     
  3. nat osman

    nat osman

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    Just thinking out loud... Why are ICC and ICE so exorbitantly priced??? Just the tuition alone is equivalent to the entire deal in Europe (tuition and living) - is it just cause everything in NYC is over-priced??
     
  4. fablesable

    fablesable

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    @nat osman  The answer to that is YES! Although most culinary schools are over-priced. The smart ones go to community collages or tech schools that offer these courses as they understand the industry does NOT CARE what school you went to, it cares on whether you can do the job asked. As a former business owner of a pastry shop and ENSP alumni I can tell you that I would not hire someone because they went to certain schools and had a bunch of certificates.......that was irrelevant. I hired people based on their ability to do the job asked and the attitude and aptitude to which they applied themselves. I mad them stage to see their work ethic, listening/communication skills, and their basic skills. They rest I can teach them. 

    You are going out there spending WAY TOO MUCH on schooling and theory and not enough time getting hands on pastry/ baking/ life experience........this approach you have going is going to backfire on you! 
     
  5. nat osman

    nat osman

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    @Fablesable that is true the industry does not care but it's a personal thing as well - individually knowing how or what someone feels they would benefit from in a certain program - the hands on is what matters most! I don't think gaining any sort of knowledge would backfire - in any field -
    how did you like ENSP ? It just didn't work out time and feasibility wise for me, but it looks like a great hands on experience -
     
  6. fablesable

    fablesable

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    ENSP is a good school. They are not of an extremely high calibre when it comes to the equipment setup however, their teachers are top notch in their field. I had the opportunity to apprentice at some of the best pastry places in the business (partly to do with my approach to the apprenticeship). Their reputation carries a certain amount of weight for apprenticeship when you come from this school so that was a bonus. 

    Knowledge can backfire if one is all in the head and has never applied that knowledge in real world applications. I am not talking school oriented practice in the kitchens, I am talking about real world, real pastry shop experience. I am just giving you a head's up that when you get out in the industry after taking all that schooling, you will still have to start at the bottom in the dish pit, sweeping/mopping and basic organization for a while until they feel comfortable about your work ethic (this is unless you have had prior food industry kitchen experience). This applies for both young and older people, age is not recognized unless it becomes a hinderance to the job at hand. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif
     
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  7. khurram

    khurram

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    Professional Baker
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    Ecole bellouet conseil + LCB pastry diploma + short bread at ENSP:  something very unusual

    I do wish you great great luck but at the same time rolling my head, You really need to make a pause and have a deep breath and think again (Please read Fablesable comments "this approach you have going is going to backfire on you! "), I do have same concerns..... and he meant "financially back fire you" also remember knowledge is great as long as you absorb it and use it/apply it on daily life, (absorb & practically APPLY).

    During 12 weeks of bellouet conseil diploma program you will be touching all the major components of patisserie work, I hope you also taking 2 months of apprentice (and paying 11,760 euros as tuition fees only) so then why LCB before or afterwards? At Bellouet majority of your fellow students will be Asians (Japanese, Korean and Chinese) and they are nice, mellow companions so hopefully you have good time ; )

    I don't know how you come up tailoring this program and how you will be financing but my question is what is the REAL-real goal to achieve?

    I highly recommend you go and meet some industry people and freely talk about your goals, concerns and make a notes and think again before began your journey (or blow your money-if its appropriate to say)

    Bon voyage
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2015
    nat osman likes this.
  8. jenji

    jenji

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    Hi :) did you start your Ferrandi course yet? If so, how is it? and how much did u pay for Ferrandi.

    I find it way too out of budget like crazy expensive.
     
  9. steaktartare

    steaktartare

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    I'm planning a career change in two or three years, when I'll hit 40... Do you guys think my age could hurt chances of getting the best internships through Ferrandi? Like they save spots on the 3-stars for the young folks?

    Also, in case after the course I decide to stay for a while in France (have EU citizenship) what kind of wages can I expect?

    Finally, I intend to learn French over the next couple of years, but I'm not sure it will be enough to have full classes in French. So I'm not sure what will be my options, but right now I'm considering:

    Ferrandi - Intensive Professional Program in French Cuisine (5 months + 3 to 6 month internship)

    Lenôtre - Master Class (28 weeks) IN FRENCH ONLY

    Institut Paul Bocuse - Cuisine Française Authentique, Méditerranéenne et Contemporaine (2 weeks) IN FRENCH ONLY

    Alain Ducasse Education - Culinary Arts Diploma (5 months + 3 months internship)

    Could you please comment on these options?

    (Edited to add Alain Ducasse)
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2015