Where should spices hit you?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chrisbristol, Nov 6, 2014.

  1. chrisbristol

    chrisbristol

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    Hello

    I haven't actually ever been taught this but I always got the impression that when you eat something spicy it should hit you in the mouth.  I've always felt that if it hits you at the back of the throat  the spices haven't been cooked out enough.

    Is that right?
     
  2. caitlion

    caitlion

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    According to Paul Bosland at New Mexico State University (which has a whole department dedicated to green chile), different spice-containing foods vary on more than just heat level. An important consideration is where  the heat hits. Spice can hit front, mid, or back palate. Some cuisines' spice doesn't hit the tongue or lips due to the spices used, but comes back to kick you as you swallow. In some cuisines, it should only hit the tongue with no lingering sensation. 

    So it comes down to what spice sensation you are trying to create /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif  
     
  3. chefross

    chefross

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    Like any foods the receptors on the tongue rule. We know where sweet, salty, sour and bitter feel on the tongue, even hot.

    Spicy and hot are 2 different things.

    People use the term "hot" to imply "spicy"  but if one uses a lot of cumin, for instance, that also can mean spicy.
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I feel you should be able to taste a blend of all . not one predominant
     
  5. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I don't know but my mouth waters when I roast poblanos.