where do you write your recipes?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by veganchefjay, Nov 23, 2012.

  1. veganchefjay

    veganchefjay

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    Where does everyone prefer to write and keep their recipes?  

    I've always kept them on paper, but I now got an iPad.  I want to start using iPad but I haven't found an app that makes it easy to write recipes like on traditional paper.  Any suggestions?  I was thinking of getting MacGourmet but that is too pricy and I don't know if it is really worth it.   
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    I use Mastercook, http://www.mastercook.com/, but it is PC only and is on special through Cyber Monday for $4.99.

    Several Mac or Ipad users either run under a Windows virtual machine or use a PC and print to a PDF which can be read on an Ipad.

    I am not aware of any Mac based program that is the equivalent of Mastercook. Cosmi, which currently owns Mastercook, is rumored to be coming out with a version for the Mac
     
     
  3. twyst

    twyst

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    I set up a seperate gmail account for recipes and email myself any recipes I want to keep forever.   I can access them from anywhere including my phone and they are searchable by keyword.
     
    texas caterer and flipflopgirl like this.
  4. ummwaterstock

    ummwaterstock

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    I made my own template in word for my recipes.  I just store them on my computer.   Though I will have to checkout that mastercook link though.
     
  5. eloki

    eloki

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    I use an iphone / mac app called paprika...
     
  6. butzy

    butzy

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    I use bigoven pro. It seems to work pretty ok, but i dont have any experience with any of the other programs, so i cant compare
     
  7. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Into my computer  by catagory
     
  8. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    In digesting the question a little further, an issue arises: what do you want to do with the recipes?

    If it is simply to write them down and print them out, most word processing programs will handle that. Even a notebook and pen.

    If you are looking to:
    • Catalog and search
    • Scale
    • Prepare shopping lists
    • Prepare menus
    • Analyze nutrition
    • Control food costs
    • Control inventory
    then you need to look for some type of database system, low end Mastercook (around $20), high end ChefTec (over $500+). More options are available for PCs than Macs, however, the newer Macs apparently have Bootcamp?? which allows PC programs to run on Mac products.
     
  9. ibeacco

    ibeacco

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    I use a note taking program called notes plus. It let me type, handwrite, copy from the web and sync to and fro with Dropbox, google documents and Evernote.
    Also when you copy a picture or a PDF on a page you can scribble notes on it with your finger or stylus. The integrated web browser lets you switch seamlessly from sites to notebook in a whiff.
    Oh, and it backup itself automatically to your Dropbox.
    I imported a word format order sheet as PDF and I regularly use it to jot down orders for the restaurant and then I erase it with a gesture, so it's even paper free ;)
    And it let's you print and email pages or entire notebook.
     
  10. brandon odell

    brandon odell

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    I use, and sell, MS Excel spreadsheets for creating recipes. They are intended for food services who have to keep up-to-date recipe costs. I've used many recipe costing software like ChefTec, CostGuard and FoodTrak, all of which were more work than the spreadsheet system I already use, and also calculated inventory values using a FIFO method instead of using replacement costs as I suggest. I can link the spreadsheets to an inventory spreadsheet so product costs in the spreadsheets can be automatically updated, and to an ideal cost spreadsheet so ideal costs can be tracked to compare with actual costs calculated from doing inventory.

    By putting recipes into spreadsheets, there is a lot I can do with the information.

    Brandon O'Dell 
     
    Last edited: Nov 26, 2012
  11. pollopicu

    pollopicu

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    Edited because I had issues with the program shortly after.
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2013
  12. hozz

    hozz

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    Google Docs. accesible anywhere you have a net connection. Even that I only use for recipes I rarely do, the rest I keep in my head and recite to myself everytime I do them. That's how recipes survive. Keep doing them, and teach them.
     
    blackened1339 likes this.
  13. texas caterer

    texas caterer

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    Brandon do you have any recommendations for what to do if  you have been using Chef Tec for years, but want to get away from it.  I still like to scale the recipes, but I can't stand doing business with them anymore. There seems to be no safe way to back up the data on your own.  I guess I could start saving them one by one, but it will still take quite a bit of time.

    Marcie
     
  14. just jim

    just jim

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    I downloaded My CookBook Pro for my kindle and was very happy.

    Then I did the same for my droid since I rarely bring the kindle to work.

    Great program.

    It allows scaling too.

    I have input my own recipes, and you can also import them from the 'net.

    I uploaded a recipe to food.com to see how it worked, and I was able to import it easily.

    It's nice to have my favorite recipes in my pocket, and if I'm looking for a recipe that I'm unfamiliar with, nice to be able to import one.

    Worth a look.
     
  15. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    I use Mastercook v14, http://www.mastercook.com

    Recipe scaling, shopping list, web downloads, web access to cloud storage (if you want), works on Vista, Win7, and Win8, Mac version in progress
     
  16. huffer4

    huffer4

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    I use my iPad mini quite a bit. I use a program called RecipeBook. It was cheap (under $5 I think). It has scaling, measurements, master ingredients list, add photos and you can print directly from the app.
     
  17. soesje

    soesje

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    I wonder what makes you all consider using a pad, PC or something else electronic above just paper and pen.

    when the electronics go legs up, have you all got spare copies saved elsewhere? I sure hope so.

    I prefer the old mind...goes wherever I go, and when needed, paper and pen.

    maybe I am a bit old fashioned..... ;)
     
  18. just jim

    just jim

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    I have printed copies of all current recipes.

    I would hate to carry that stack wadded up in my pocket everyday.

    The old mind?

    As mine gets older I trust it less and less.
     
  19. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    I keep my stuff in plain ascii text files.
    as a home cook I don't need to scale things up and down much - but when I do for example cut a recipe in half for two... I can easily make a note in the computer file - where I also record weights 'on the fly' as I make stuff (vs. cups, etc.)  

    I print out a copy and can make notes with chocolate covered fingers - no problem.  just set the paper next to the computer and make changes to the file later; toss the soggy paper . . .

    I find it more important to keep notes on scaling for baking vs cooking - some baking ingredients do not work well in the "just times 2.5 . . ." mode

    yes I could do the same thing on paper.  after while the paper gets messed up, too full, scribbled over - electronic copies are much easier for me to maintain.  plus, when somebody wants a recipe, I don't need a copy machine....

    my  first attempt was a 3 ring binder of page protector with tabs & organized & etc.  pulling a recipe page out of the protector isn't too bad, making the notes complete with spaghetti sauce and getting the page back into the protector,,, not so easy.

    I have learned by painful experience - not limited to "cooking stuff" - that "applications" come and go - and you can get stuck - with no "export" function available - that was mentioned above...

    data data everywhere and not a drop dead way to get at it....

    text files work on a Mac, too (g)

    >>when the electronics go legs up,
    (you've heard this....)

    there are only two kinds of computers - those that have already failed and those that have not yet failed.  

    those who fail to regularly back up their computer data are doomed to lose it.
     
  20. beastmasterflex

    beastmasterflex

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    Keep them in my head too, gotta keep it moving. Don't like to hang on to old recipes, seems like it stops me from trying something new. Maybe I'll regret that decision later.