Where did "86" come from?

Discussion in 'The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)' started by kuan, Jan 17, 2003.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Anyone know? Where did the term "86" come from?

    Kuan
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd swear I'd seen a thread on that term here before. The search won't work for this as 86 is not long enough to be a valid search though.

    Dictionary.com gives this:

    eight·y-six or 86 (t-sks)
    tr.v. Slang eight·y-sixed, or 86·ed eight·y-six·ing, or 86·ing eight·y-six·es or 86·es
    To refuse to serve (an unwelcome customer) at a bar or restaurant.

    To throw out; eject.
    To throw away; discard.


    [Perhaps after Chumley's bar and restaurant at 86 Bedford Street in Greenwich Village, New York City.]
     
  3. chef1x

    chef1x

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    Hmmm, I seem to recall this thread as well. I have heard the above explaination many times over the years.

    But I think Kuan is pulling our legs. He's probably using this as a prelude to firing someone;)
     
  4. cape chef

    cape chef

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  5. chef1x

    chef1x

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    :) AHA!!

    Thank You Cape Chef (on Kuan's behalf:rolleyes:) Sorry to butt in,

    but while perusing that thread you mentioned Barry Wine and Katy Sparks. I knew that name sounded familiar. The first real chef I worked for was a Barry Wine disciple and formally of Quilted Giraffe. He would go on and on about it, but of course that was WAY ahead of my time and I didn't really get it. I sometimes hear references to Barry and QG, can you tell me anything more? The chef I worked for is now in some heavenly resort in Vail, CO and I plan on using him as a reference on my resume, so I'll be contacting him soon and he would get a kick out of any good stories. Thanks! Maybe a different thread?

    :blush: My apologies Kuan.
     
  6. chiffonade

    chiffonade

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    Doesn't it mean 8 feet long, six feet deep like when you bury a coffin?
     
  7. chef1x

    chef1x

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    That sounds like a reasonable explaination, chiff, but I've never heard that...
    Where'd you get that?
     
  8. chiffonade

    chiffonade

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    I may have heard it someplace but in truth, it was the first image that popped into my mind.
     
  9. panini

    panini

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    I agree with Chiff. It's a southern thang. The saloons and food establishments down here used to hire gravediggers to dig the food refuse pits. They dug em 8ft X 6ft.
    But ya know the yankees will try to take credit for everything.;)
     
  10. chef1x

    chef1x

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    I like this explaination,
    no doubt you frequented one of those saloons and/or were a grave digger.:)
     
  11. cwk

    cwk

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    Let's see here.....I recall a story about a resturant that had a back door towards
    86 st. I think in chicago,getting tossed out ment getting tossed to 86th. Heck there's a lot of stories but I think Willard Espy (RIP) wrote about it in the book
    'Thou Inproper, thou Uncommon noun'.
    Don't quote me on it as I haven't read in some time.
    Bill