When should I say no? Dealing with gas lines

1
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Joined Jan 15, 2021
Hello all Chefs!
I work in a small business kitchen, which I have been with for almost 2 years now. I have been working as a line cook, but I've recently been pushed into the position of assistant manager. The owner of the company has recently started requiring the staff to disconnect all gas lines when cleaning behind the grills, fryers, and stoves. The owner says this is to protect the gas lines from being damaged ( I personally don't think moving the equipment with gas lines connected causes damage)We clean behind the equipment daily at the close of the kitchen. Since I am the main closer, I have to do this almost every night, along with re-lighting all the pilots. Even with quick release gas hoses, I feel very uncomfortable having to do this. I am not a lazy person at all, and I am willing to do anything for my kitchen. But I feel like this isn't something that I should be having to do, and messing with the gas hoses every night worries me. Should I say something to my kitchen manager? Should I bring it up with the owner?
 
1,215
746
Joined Mar 1, 2017
From an owner's perspective, that's just risky as hell.

First, this creates unnecessary wear and tear on the lines, especially the parts at the point of connection. This could lead to a gas leak with potentially disastrous consequences.

Whether or not you should bring this up to your manager or owner is a judgement call on your part. We don't know these people and any advice we give is based on a guess about how they would react. If pressed for an answer. I suppose you could say something to the manager and let him/her handle it from there.

You may also want to consider your options in the event this ridiculous practice continues.

Good luck. :)
 
778
282
Joined May 25, 2015
Those gas lines are flexible so you can pull the appliance out to clean. If pulling it out far enough so you can get behind it stretches or puts stress on the hoses maybe they aren't long enough or piped properly. Using the disconnect is a bad idea. It's not meant for constant use, only to allow removal or replacement of the appliance. I imagine that there is a pretty strong smell of gas in the air between disconnecting and unlit pilots. You would never know if one or more of the disconnects was leaking.
 
154
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Joined Jan 9, 2019
Not sure of your location, but here in BC you "technically" need a gas-fitter "B" ticket to be connecting/reconnecting gas lines, or it may (probably will) void your insurance .
Flexible gas pipe, bellows metal, or otherwise - is only good for so long, and needs to be checked regularly, depending on movement.
Perhaps call your local gas Co. & ask?
G'Luck! :)
 
778
282
Joined May 25, 2015
Not sure of your location, but here in BC you "technically" need a gas-fitter "B" ticket to be connecting/reconnecting gas lines, or it may (probably will) void your insurance .
Flexible gas pipe, bellows metal, or otherwise - is only good for so long, and needs to be checked regularly, depending on movement.
Perhaps call your local gas Co. & ask?
G'Luck! :)

No. These are designed to be disconnected with just your hands. Quick disconnect. Notice the restraining cable installed so that you can't pull it out too far and stress the gas line.

 
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