Wheat Bread Tastes Good - But No Fluff

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by hotchop, Aug 20, 2012.

  1. hotchop

    hotchop

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
     Hi there guys!

     For some reason my wheat bread tastes delicious. However, it's always quite dense and lacks the fluff of supermarket bread.

    Got any suggestions?

    Thanks
     
  2. minas6907

    minas6907

    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    14
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Can you give any detail on what the makeup of the break is? Is it made entirely of whole wheat flour? Are you free forming it or baking in loaf pans? What's your bread formula and procedure look like? Have you tried other formulas to try to achieve your desired texture, or have you been sticking to just this one? We need details before offering suggestions.

    Sent from my DROID X2 using Tapatalk 2
     
  3. siduri

    siduri

    Messages:
    3,599
    Likes Received:
    42
    Exp:
    At home cook
    It's very unlikely there is all that much whole wheat in the supermarket bread.  They use a small proportion of whole wheat to white flour to make it fluffy. 

    But you can make a pretty soft and high-rising 100% whole wheat loaf if you take very good care of the gluten. 

    Milk makes bread softer

    kneading in COOL butter AFTER it's been kneaded to be elastic and smooth, little slivers at a time, make for a high rise and a softer crumb (yes, believe it or not, even quite a lot of butter) - adding it melted it gets absorbed into the flour, making it rise less. 

    Knead well to develop gluten, but don;t mistreat the dough.  Don't slam it and punch it.  knead steadily, then turn the part that's against the table to the top, put into bowl to rise, don't punch down but pull it away from the sides gently and press gently.  Let it rise again.  Then turn out top side down, on floured board, and flatten it well, but gently, using hands, and fold all around in a circle, folding inwards, so you have a ball.  Turn over, cover, set ten minutes, turn top down again.  flatten, and roll like a jelly roll and put into greased pan.  Let rise until pressing it half a knuckle into the dough it leaves a slowly filling-in impression, and bake. 
     
  4. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,102
    Likes Received:
    183
    Exp:
    Former Chef
  5. hotchop

    hotchop

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
     
  6. hotchop

    hotchop

    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Cook
  7. indygal

    indygal

    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    17
    Exp:
    At home cook
    Hi, 
    I have to second the article by Chef George on 100% WW bread.  I tried it and his was very good, much lighter than I had been making.

    However, I'm simply spoiled by the no-knead method.  So I've started incorporating Chef Geroge's ideas about wet dough and getting the WW thoroughly moistened.   So I add addtional water, and let it rise 12-18 hours (Using only 1-1½ tsp. instand yeast.   I have not measured anything, just eyeballed a wet dough.  When I shape it, sometimes it is too wet, so I keep folding it on itself (I work it on a sheet of waxed paper) generously working in more WW flour. If it is too wet, it won't rise well, but it has to be as wet as possible to give it more elasticity and better rise.   My dough looks *almost* as elastic as his did when I shape it, a good compromise, IMO.    I always make 2 loaves and we love it for sandwiches.  

    However, my attempt at using this dough for hamburger buns fell --- ahem ---- flat.  And heavy.  So I still have to work on it.

    But I'm convinced it can be done as no-knead b/c the loaves turn out very well.

    Indy
     
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2012
  8. bliss

    bliss

    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Home Chef
    Well i had the same issues with my bread when i started baking, i came to know about some bread improvers that enhances the fluffy textrue into your bread along with yeast, i tried it and it turns out to be much flullfier! I have also read about bleaced flour, but don't have much information about it.
     
  9. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

    Messages:
    4,333
    Likes Received:
    81
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    In my rye bread made with a poolish and 5 parts AP with 1 part rye flour (by volume), I plan to add more yeast along with some ascorbic acid as they do with some European flours.