What's your impression of sous vide?

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Joined Nov 6, 2004
   Stuffing was made by my wife, it's her mothers recipe.  Very simple and a softer dressing with some crispy tops. It's bread, celery onion, garlic, sage, salt, pepper, butter and a blended egg with some stock then leg quarters were roasted on top
 
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You need to get up to the low 140s F for 72 hour short ribs to be fork-tender, but 48 hours in the mid 130s F works great if you're going for a steak consistency.
That depends on what we're talking about when we say 'short ribs'.  If you mean cut into longish chunks on the bone then no amount of 130's will ever break down the connective tissue.
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
 
   Stuffing was made by my wife, it's her mothers recipe.  Very simple and a softer dressing with some crispy tops. It's bread, celery onion, garlic, sage, salt, pepper, butter and a blended egg with some stock then leg quarters were roasted on top
OT but this is my recipe only I use cornbread.

Tummy rumbling.

Going to crock pot a pork roast later.

Think we'll have dressing.....

mimi
 
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OT but this is my recipe only I use cornbread.

Tummy rumbling.

Going to crock pot a pork roast later.

Think we'll have dressing.....

mimi
The only things I'd add to it are chestnuts and cranberries on occasion.

Rick
 
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Sous vide can really transform tougher but flavorful cuts of meat.  The only caveat is that somethings -such as the connective tissue in beef short ribs- will not break down even with 72+ hours of low temps.  You really need higher heat for those.  But chuck is sublime.
   Hi Phaedrus!

  Have you sous vide beef ribs before at varying times and temperatures?  Love to hear your experiences.

   ChefSteps has a page on beef short ribs and varying time/temps.  They've got a description of each method and an accompanying video that also worth the time.  The video shows the cut and pull of each cook, while you can't get a taste...you can get a pretty good idea of how the cook went.
 
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WE have been doing sous-vide for over 2 years now.

It is only the 2 of us. So spending 2 days cooking a chunky piece of meat is of no use to us.

When using SV, check your approach. Either you want want to pre-cook scallops, then dip the bag in ice-cold water, refrigerate, then sauté it before serving the client, is one thing.

For domestic use, you cook it at the correct temp and serve it straight away, or at a lower temp and quickly panfry it.

In any case, there are pieces that I disliked (dry) such as turkey fillets, chicken breasts... and now I enjoy them, and my guests also.

I certainly do not regret my investment (I bought the Anova, from Texas, sturdy, no problem so far).

I'd suggest beginners start with a zip bag and a thermometer, digital, it won't be so precise, but hell! It will be good enough!

There is a free book in pdf on the net by Douglas Baldwin.

Keep in mind that he want everything pasteurised so his temps may be a bit high, you don't need that with a good immune system...

SV scallops are the best I ever ate... Translucent! Melt in the mouth!
 
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I think it's kind of a cheap shortcut so people don't have to learn how to cook something properly.
 
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This is a meatloaf I did Sous Vide. I made it flatter so it would cook evenly. I have also made, Turkey breast, Chicken breast, dbl cut pork chops, steak, top round, Baby back ribs and so on. When it comes to steak I agree with earlier posts that talked about a thick Filet Mignon would be the perfect example for Sous Vide cooking. Dbl cut pork chops are another meat that works well. All of the restaurants serving pork belly would be well advised to cook it Sous Vide. I sealed the ziploc bag using a water displacement method. I think the pic is before I did the WD method. I always do the meats in a air tight sealed bag. I didn't want the meatloaf to crush under the pressure of sealing the bag making it air tight......I finished the meatloaf under the broiler for a few minutes.


 
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I think it's kind of a cheap shortcut so people don't have to learn how to cook something properly.
Hi,

Im New to this forum. I own a seasonal rest in a vacation area of new hampshir. I have been reading a great deal about sous vide but am a little ( probably a lot ) confused. I want to make a buttermilk fried chicken.. i own a rational ove. iwas thinking about pree cooking the chickening the oven or maybe par boiling. The I thought I could use sous vide. Now here is where my lack of experience comes to play. We are a small operation and I was hoping to make a large amount of chicken. then freezing the cooked bags.. reheat aa few as i need the in a microwave.. the sakingthem in buttermilk and cooking to order. Is this feasible. What I mostly read is the prep is for immediate use. I'm confuseded. Is there a book or information that i could get that explais sous vide from the view of a rest  rather than the home cook where most of publications seed to be slated???   Just a thought if I can cook freeze reheat could this be applied to regular hamburgers??? anyone with any information I would appreciate hearing from you. jim
 
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Hi,

Im New to this forum. I own a seasonal rest in a vacation area of new hampshir. I have been reading a great deal about sous vide but am a little ( probably a lot ) confused. I want to make a buttermilk fried chicken.. i own a rational ove. iwas thinking about pree cooking the chickening the oven or maybe par boiling. The I thought I could use sous vide. Now here is where my lack of experience comes to play. We are a small operation and I was hoping to make a large amount of chicken. then freezing the cooked bags.. reheat aa few as i need the in a microwave.. the sakingthem in buttermilk and cooking to order. Is this feasible. What I mostly read is the prep is for immediate use. I'm confuseded. Is there a book or information that i could get that explais sous vide from the view of a rest  rather than the home cook where most of publications seed to be slated???   Just a thought if I can cook freeze reheat could this be applied to regular hamburgers??? anyone with any information I would appreciate hearing from you. jim
Hey Jim, welcome to Cheftalk! Think of Sous Vide as cooking in a air tight bag with low heat. The chicken can be cook Sous Vide and then cooked fast in a ice water bath then frozen for future use. If you want to make fried chicken just thaw, put into buttermilk and fry. I figure what your looking for is a way to get your fried chicken faster without having to go from raw to cooked.........hope this helped........
 
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POULTRY
 ThicknessTemperatureTime
 inchcmFCminmax
White Meat            
Chicken Breast, bone in25146+63.5+2.5 hrs4-6 hrs
Chicken Breast, boneless12.5146+63.5+1 hr2-4 hrs
Turkey Breast, bone in2.757146+63.5+4 hrs6-8 hrs
Turkey Breast, boneless25146+63.5+2.5 hrs4-6 hrs
Duck Breast12.5134+56.5+1.5 hrs4-6 hrs
             
Dark Meat            
Chicken Leg or Thigh, bone in    165-17674-804 hrs6-8 hrs
Chicken Thigh, boneless12.5165-17674-802 hrs4-6 hrs
Turkey Leg or Thigh    165-17674-808 hrs10 hrs
Duck Leg    165-17674-808 hrs18 hrs
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
It works with a store bought chicken, but it's way too long for a free range bird, or a wild bird.  I'm going to shorten the time up next time I do a commercial chicken and see.  
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
 
Mike, how long did you cook yours ?.....Big range from Min to Max on this chart. 
Billy the first time I did it I went with their time/temp schedule and it came out really well.  The second time I used a free range bird and it was too long.  I'm going to play around with it some more to dial it in.  What I do like about sous vide is I can set a time on a phone app and walk away.
 
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