Whats up with chicken tasting weird/nasty when cooked too fast?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by spicyfood, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. spicyfood

    spicyfood

    Messages:
    55
    Likes Received:
    14
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Anytime I broil chicken especially if I do so at a high temp to cook the chicken faster, I've noticed the chicken gets a nasty flavor to it. And after you broil it to the point its cooked, it will be stringy/chewy unless you over-over cook it until its falling apart. So specifically heres what I've done and i've done it multiple times.

    Get a piece of chicken breast, typically it's still cold coming out the fridge. Put it in a pan with some water mixed with whatever, and broil it at a high temp with tin foil over top. I've had the exact same outcome multiple times every occasion I've been forced to broil chicken (desperation/not enough time or willpower to fry it or cook properly). The chicken gets this nasty gamey flavor to it. I say gamey, in the sense turkey is gamey. So say you eat some cold left overturkey somebody made and it's not veyr good, sometimes you'll get this "gamey" poultry taste to it. Not sure how to explain it but its not a meat flavor, like how if you cook pork you want to get that porky flavor to it, this is different it doesnt taste like chicken flavor it tastes almost tainted. Now I know the meat is good, I've had this happen at least 3 times i can think of in my years of being on this earth. Each time it seems like I've tried cooking the chicken too fast, and somehow that affects the flavor.

    Is there any rhyme or reason to this? I actually cooked a package of chicken different ways, I made some nuggets and fried them, came out good juicy flavor was good I didnt add much seasoning either it tastes as you'd expect. Then out the same package, not 12 hours later, with the chicken comoing out the fridge it was already dethawed, I broiled at a high temp and chicken came out nasty and spongy/stringy.
     
  2. chefwriter

    chefwriter

    Messages:
    1,988
    Likes Received:
    512
    Exp:
    Professional Cook
    I am not sure how to answer this. Not trying to be sarcastic.
    You have proven that what you are doing results in a bad taste. So the obvious answer is to stop doing it.
    I'm sure there is a scientific reason for the chicken developing the poor flavor and stringiness but the practical answer is that doing what you are doing is not a good way to cook chicken.
    This situation is an illustration of why techniques in cooking are so important in the final outcome. Some techniques help you achieve great results, other techniques make things worse.
    If you continue to use this method, brining the chicken first might help but then remove from the brine and broil with no water or foil.
    You could also try using only boneless chicken if you aren't already. Then first broil for a few minutes on one side then turn the chicken over and broil the other side.
    If you don't get the results you want, change something and try again. But doing the same exact thing will only get you the same exact result.
     
  3. cheflayne

    cheflayne

    Messages:
    4,478
    Likes Received:
    734
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I am just way confused by your entire post. Still trying to figure out "...water...broil...tin foil over top..." all being in the same sentence to describe the process.
     
    Seoul Food likes this.
  4. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

    Messages:
    275
    Likes Received:
    87
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I would think it may have to do with either the foil or the pan. Are you using some coated non stick type pan? That may be releasing flavors and chemicals because of the way you are cooking.
     
  5. harpua

    harpua

    Messages:
    710
    Likes Received:
    214
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    It might be the weird way you are putting water and foil.. you're basically boiling it which will give you that nasty boiled chicken flavor.
     
  6. cheflayne

    cheflayne

    Messages:
    4,478
    Likes Received:
    734
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    The method being used is a hodge podge. Broil is basically an inverted grill with no direct contact between the heat source and the food being broiled. By putting the tin foil on the top and including water you are no longer broiling you are doing more of a quasi steam or quasi boil depending upon how much water you are using. You are taking away the positives of broiling and leaving only heat in the equation and so you are winding up with a product that is the result of incorrectly done broiling?/steaming?/boiling?
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
    halb likes this.
  7. halb

    halb

    Messages:
    548
    Likes Received:
    195
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    I agree, Yuk! Where did you ever get that idea from?
    Watching this first would have saved you a lot of time.
     
  8. maryb

    maryb

    Messages:
    2,608
    Likes Received:
    226
    Exp:
    Semi pro/retired now
    425 oven, rack 2/3 way up from bottom. Start skin side down, flip at 15 minutes so skin side up and cook until done... usually about 45 minutes total. Painless, crisp skin, tender tasty chicken... I do this all the time when I am lazy and don't wan to watch what I am cooking. I use the same technique on the Traeger smoker too but lower temps to 375 because the heat source is closer to the chicken.
     
  9. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

    Messages:
    7,544
    Likes Received:
    729
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I agree with everyone else here, it’s not the chicken that is at fault here, it is the technique, or actually lack of technique that is the problem. Let’s start by asking what outcome are you expecting and then we’ll help you achieve that. Because broiling and water and foiling have nothing to do with each other.
     
    french fries likes this.