What's the right way to use dried tangerine peel?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by live_to_cook, Aug 18, 2002.

  1. live_to_cook

    live_to_cook

    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    10
    I'm making a Chinese cucumber recipe from Saveur that's basically a quick pickle. It's supposed to have a bit of dried tangerine peel crumbled over the top. I bought the stuff in a grocery in Chinatown. Tasting it plain, it's not as citrusy flavorful as I would have expected, and a bit bitter.

    Maybe I got stuff that's just old and past its prime? Or is that what it's like, and you have to cook it to get any flavor?

    I'm also reminded that I've seen candied tangerine peel. Maybe that's just what is normally meant by dried tangerine peel?

    Any input from someone with experience with this ingredient would be much appreciated.
     
  2. foodaholic

    foodaholic

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    10
    Hi Live_to_cook,

    Crumble over the top.....this sounds like it's applied dry,check the recipe and if this is not a misprint,then change it.
    Reconstitute the orange peel in any liquid you desire,dice it fine,then apply to the dish.
    Generally peel is added for brightness,I'm refering to taste to help balance a dish.
    Yup its very easy to get old and VERY dried out peel.I would suggest you dry your own,a far superior product than anything you will buy and you can control the moisture as well.

    Candied peel is basically cooked in a sugar syrup,and is excellent
    in dessert applications.

    To ensure the peel has the least amount of bitterness make sure
    no white pith is on the peel.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. barista

    barista

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    10
    :bounce:

    Here's a question I can answer! I'm Chinese and i make my own dried peel.

    We have a saying as old as old tangerine peel. So the longer it is, the more intese the flavour. You don't actually taste it by just breaking off pieces and tasting. The way to use this peel is to put it into whatever you are cooking and let it flavour the dish. A word of warning, start with a little, as it goes a long way. There's no turning back once you 've put it into a stew, or whatever you're making.

    The bitterness of the peel, after it's been left to infuse it's flavour in a dish is of a sweet type. I don't know how to explain in English, but there should be a vey pleasant after-taste in your mouth.

    Candied peel is totally a different kettle of fish. It's very seldom used in Chinese cooking.

    Hope that helps.
     
  4. live_to_cook

    live_to_cook

    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    10
    Thanks - that's what I was wondering.
     
  5. barista

    barista

    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    10
    I'm just happy to be able to contribute :D