Whats the best way to serve up braised lamb shanks in a restaurant

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by thasnap, Apr 26, 2012.

  1. thasnap

    thasnap

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    If I braise the lamb shanks in a big pot for 2-3 hours before service what do i do when service starts? I was thinking just leave them in the pot and pull portions out with a little bit of the sauce and place in a pan and oven to heat them up to order, saute some more veg and plate them up. Is this normal practice? What kind of veg would you guys use to finish and would you cook them seperate so they look nice for presentation?                    .
     
  2. shoemaker14

    shoemaker14

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    Personally, we place the entire batch in a hotel pan and keep it refrigerated. We take one serving of the lamb shank out, with a fair amount of the braising liquid, and place it in a sauce pan. Heat until the liquid is boiling, cover, and throw in the oven until the meat is hot and tender. Take the shank out, reduce the sauce to the correct consistency, and serve.
     
  3. thasnap

    thasnap

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    Very nice. do you put the shank back in the oven with the sauce? do you fininsh with any sauted veg?
     
  4. cookers

    cookers

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    Here's my lamb shank dish I did awhile ago. 

    [​IMG]

    We usually put our shanks in the oven for about 2 hours at 350 degrees to brown them. Then we take them out and add our mirepoix on top. When we do any type of shank at work we saute our white mirepoix and then add some tomato paste to it. Then we add a beef base and water mix and pour that in. Then we usually just cook that at 350 degrees for 2-3 hours. After that we refrigerate it over night and the next day we individually wrap each shank and keep the fat/jelly to make shank sauce with. We keep a small amount in the cooler and freeze the rest. When we need one on the line, we do what shoemaker does and put it in a container with water, cover it and put it in an oven to heat it up. 
     
    Last edited: May 7, 2012
  5. someday

    someday

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    The best way to do it would be to allow your meat, after it is cooked, to cool down to room temp in the braising liquid, then strain the liquid, re-cover the shanks and refrigerate overnight. 

    When you need one, take out of the liquid, put in a pan with some of the braising liquid, and bring to a simmer on the stove. Baste the shank with the sauce a few times as it heats up. 

    Put the shank and the sauce in the oven, and baste several more times throughout the re-heating process. This will coat the shank in the sauce, and as the sauce reduces and thickens, will glaze the shank and give you a beautiful surface of the meat. Obviously the reduced sauce will be served with the meat as well. 
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    On a befd of smashed potatoes with a Julianne of vegetables on top with  the natural sauce. Or on top of a rissuto ir warm cous cous. Large sprig fresh rosemary on top
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2012
  7. squirrelrj

    squirrelrj Banned

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    500 degrees for two hours? how in the world are they not burnt to a crisp?

    Even covered, I can't understand how they won't have burn spots on them from the heat of whatever vessel they are being cooked in.
     
  8. thasnap

    thasnap

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    Wow that looks beautiful, well presented. How did you cook the asparagus?
     
  9. thasnap

    thasnap

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    Great method, Thats what i was thinkingn to do, Ill use that method
     
  10. thasnap

    thasnap

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    Thank you. What vegetables would you use and would you just sautee them for a few minuits ?
     
  11. chefedb

    chefedb

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    500 a bit to high for me., but to ec his own
     
  12. dcarch

    dcarch

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    My sous vided lamb shank.

    dcarch

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  13. twyst

    twyst

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    Details please dcarch!   Ive got a shank in my home fridge that I was going to braise tomorrow, I didnt even think about cooking it sous vide.  What temp and how long etc?
     
    Last edited: Apr 29, 2012
  14. dcarch

    dcarch

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    24 hours at 132 F, then blow torched it.

    Don't forget to take a picture of yours.

    dcarch
     
  15. cookers

    cookers

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    I meant 350 degrees for two hours. I typed 500 because I was thinking of the oven I put them in which is usually set at 500. Thanks for catching that. 
     
  16. cookers

    cookers

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    Beautiful plate. Very abstract