What's Growing in your 2005 Garden?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mudbug, May 26, 2005.

  1. mudbug

    mudbug

    Messages:
    2,068
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    What's going on in your garden this year?

    Anything come back from last year?
    Trying something new this year?
    Particularly excited about something specific?
    Attempting a different gardening technique?
    Already harvested something?

    I've already had asparagus and strawberries. Eagerly awaiting an abundance of fresh, sweet raspberries at which time I may harverst the rhubarb. Herbs are back in full force and looking forward to long beans, peas, brussel sprouts and tomatoes.

    How about you?
     
  2. jenni belle

    jenni belle

    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    10
    This is the first year for my garden in the new house. I'm very anxious for fresh produce!

    I have strawberries and raspberries growing. Some onions and peppers. I planted 5 different types of peppers including red bells, purple bells, italian roasters, big jims and some hot ones that I don't remember the name of!

    I also have 8 heirloom tomato plants growing. There's Matinas, Rutgers, Brandywine Blacks, Yellow Pears, Sweet 100's, Thessolonikis, Sun Sugars and Black From Tulas. I am VERY anxious for my tomatoes! I love maters! MMMmm.......can just eat them right off the vine! Yummm!!!!!!
     
  3. phoebe

    phoebe

    Messages:
    966
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    I don't want to jinx myself or my garden, but I'm having the best tomato growing season ever! :bounce: :bounce: :bounce: The ones in 15 gal. containers are going wild. (It's a jungle out there :eek: ) and there are tomatoes coming in on all of them.
    I've got:
    Azoychka (new to me)
    Brandywine/ Sudduth
    Cherokee Purple
    Flamme (new to me)
    Golden Pineapple
    Green Zebra
    Marianna's Peace
    Matina
    Opalka
    Prudens Purple
    Kimberly (new to me, thanks to a kind soul who sent me seeds)
    Sophie's Choice (new to me, and thanks to another kind supplier of seeds)
    Jet Star (new to me)
    Momotaro (new to me)
    Sun Gold
    Sweet Chelsea

    Along with 4 varieties of peppers, lots of herbs and some kale, I'm growing French Filet Beans, Spanish Musica beans, Oregon sugar pods, and Bright Lights chard all for the first time.

    But I still manage to mess up with ornamentals. If they make it, they make it without my help (or interference). :D
     
  4. chrose

    chrose

    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    33
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    It would be redundant of me to reply here as I have a continuing post as to my garden experiment (which is not to say I mind talking and talking about it! :D )
    So I will say this. I am getting ready to finish what I am planting. It's been cold and wet here so our gardens start later than many. I did however dig up another 30-40 sq. ft. that I hope to turn and compost this weekend. I just wish I could turn my whole backyard into a giant garden! I'm jealous of you people who appear to have plenty of space to grow all these items! Well keep an eye on my Bountea posts as I update them.
     
  5. harpua

    harpua

    Messages:
    656
    Likes Received:
    162
    Exp:
    Professional Pastry Chef
    This year we are trying a "three sisters" garden. That means a circle of corn, with pole beans planted to crawl up the corn, and then squash to cover the ground to keep moisture in and weeds from growing. How exciting!!

    We also have brandywines, zebra, cherry, and celebrities growing. I also have a different heirloom growing, but I'm not sure what. We saved the seeds from a really tasty tomato. I had a german strawberry tomato plant, but it died :(.

    We also have cowpeas (tasty green beans!), red and purple potatoes, japanese eggplant, onions, chives, garlics, habanero, serrano and bell peppers. Also various herbs. So much cilantro for the loads of pico we'll be having this summer.

    My pumpkin plant is going nuts!!! I'm afraid I planted it too early.. I just have to be sure and store the pumpkins well for halloween. I already have a female flower, and the vine just established itself. When I get a picture of it, I'll post it. I'm very excited.

    As far as what has popped up from last year:
    cherry tomotaoes
    really good, meaty cucumbers
    some sort of hot chile
    ornamental squash

    I love our garden so much!
     
  6. redace1960

    redace1960

    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    12
    the soil just warmed up here enough to put starts in. ive got all my tomatoes, peppers and cukes hardened off and thats all i'm really doing this year....i have a baby grandson to play with while his moms at college!
    as weeds i have cilantro, basil, leeks, chives, asparagus, garlic and strawberries.
     
  7. markv

    markv

    Messages:
    572
    Likes Received:
    10
    I like planting lots of herbs. It saves me a ton of money.

    Parlsey, oregano, basil, thyme, rosemary, and cilantro.

    My vegetables are just tomatoes, eggplant, and hot peppers.

    Mark
     
  8. jenni belle

    jenni belle

    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    10
    Oh, I forgot the herbs! Yes, lots of herbs too! I have quite a salsa garden growing!

    So, I was outside watering yesterday and noticed flowers on 5 of my 8 tomato plants! YAY! I'm so excited! :bounce:
     
  9. phoebe

    phoebe

    Messages:
    966
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Mudbug, You're looking forward to tomatoes? :p I thought you didn't even like them? :D
     
  10. mudbug

    mudbug

    Messages:
    2,068
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    You're right (someone's been paying attention)... I never liked tomatoes my entire life (never had any flavor, hard, tasted like tap water)... until I grew an heirloom Cherokee Purple Tomato plant in my own garden and harvested a perfectly ripe specimen on a warm afternoon and tried it within minutes of picking it from the vine.

    I thought... "Is this what a tomato's supposed to taste like?"

    I was told by others... "That just means you have 'taste' ". ;)
     
  11. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,356
    Likes Received:
    915
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    This year I am just sticking to my herb garden. Last summer work kept me so busy that my garden pretty well got neglicated after the first month. Besides, we joined our CSA again and will have plenty of wonderful, organic vegetables coming to us.
     
  12. porkchops

    porkchops

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    I've got quite a few herbs, most of which are doing well. The purple basil is sputtering along. Most of the seedling died when I put it in the ground, but it looks like it's finally growing again. I was told that it was still a little too cold for the basil when I first put it in the ground..

    I've got 2 Roma and 2 Beefsteak tomato plants, 2 Cubano and 2 Jalapano plants.. I did have 2 eggplants, but I was out of town for a week, and I think they died.. and were strangely replaced by weeds. I need to look up some pictures of eggplant plants. I resisted digging them up.

    I also bought some sorrel. I've never cooked with it before, but the seedling looked especially luscious. Its doing really well. I nibbled a bit, and it's very tart. I'm not sure what I'll do with it yet.. but I'll find something.

    --P
     
  13. chrose

    chrose

    Messages:
    2,518
    Likes Received:
    33
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    This recipe is from a "Jewish Mothers Cookbook". I remember growing up and my father liked to have this in the summer with some Sour Cream. It's the only thing I know of to do with it personally.

    Title: SCHAV BORSCHT (SORREL LEAVES)
    Categories: Soups, Passover
    Yield: 6 servings

    1 lb Schav; (sorrel leaves)
    2 tb Butter; OR oil
    1 md Onion; finely minced
    6 c -Water
    1 ts Kosher salt
    2 tb Sugar
    1 Lemon; for juice
    2 Egg yolks; beaten
    Sour cream; for garnish

    1. Wash the sorrel thoroughly in several changes of
    cold water. Remove and discard the stems. Chop the
    leaves into thin ribbons. You can make this with
    spinach but the taste will be different. Sorrel has a
    sour/bitter flavor.

    2. Heat the butter or oil in a 3 quart saucepan and
    saute, the sorrel and onions. Cook stirring, for 10
    minutes until the sorrel is wilted and the onion
    translucent. Add water and salt. Let the soup simmer
    for 25 to 30 minutes more.

    3. Remove from heat and stir in sugar. Add the lemon
    juice 1 tb. at a time, tasting constantly to achieve
    the degree of tartness that pleases you.

    4. Beat a tablespoon or two of the soup into the egg
    yolks, then stir egg yolks into the soup. Reheat the
    soup but do not let it boil after adding the egg yolks.

    5. Serve hot or cold, accompanied by sour cream;

    NOTE: This is NOT my family's favorite soup, but I
    loved it as a child, and nothing quenches your thirst
    on a hot Summer's day then a good gulp straight from
    the fridge.
     
  14. porkchops

    porkchops

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    10
    Thanks for the recipe! I can't wait to try it.. especially with the sour cream.

    I wonder how tall I should let it grow before I harvest any... I might post some pictures in a couple of weeks.

    Thanks again!

    --P :lips:
     
  15. pierre

    pierre

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    i just added a few new things to my small urban garden this weekend. so here's the list food related plants:

    rosemary, sage, oregeno, thyme, lemon thyme, savory, bay laurel, parsley, thai cilantro, mint, sorrel, and a struggling meyer lemon tree.

    just added: stevia, dill, & strawberries

    it's so nice to be able to just run out to the garden and snip what i need.

    i also have a small fig tree that just sprouted up a few years ago in a small corner behind my apt building. it's never even hinted at producing any fruit but it's there. this winter i had to prune it back some and just for the heck of it i stuck some of the cuttings in a pot of dirt. now i've got another 10 fig trees in the making. no idea what i'm going to do with them but it was exciting just to see that the cuttings took root.
     
  16. mudbug

    mudbug

    Messages:
    2,068
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
  17. pierre

    pierre

    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    mudbug,
    the lemon tree (shrub is more like it) isn't in the best of conditions. i think the urban neighborhood where i live in SF, CA doesn't get the warmth and good sun that citrus trees need. during the summer months is when the daily fog rolls in at about 3pm and it's just plain cold, damp, and gray. also, it's a container plant and could probably do to get watered more often that i does. my bad.

    actually, right now there are about a dozen small lemons that are bigger than has ever been on the tree in the 7 years of it's life. they are about the size of a small lime. the weather has been mostly good and there was alot of spring rain to help things along. if all goes well, i'll be looking for a lemon bar recipe soon.
     
  18. mudbug

    mudbug

    Messages:
    2,068
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Culinary Instructor
    Pierre,

    If the tree has been in the same container for a year or more and it is drying out rapidly, it may be root bound. I recommend repotting it to a pot that is 3-4 inches wider. This will allow it to retain moisture for a longer amount of time, add nutrients with the proper soil, and give the roots some breathing room. Use a soil that is light, fuffy and nutrient rich.

    Container plants deplete the nutrients in the available soil over time and need nutrients added regularly. At least do this until you can repot. If you want to make more light available for the plant, if it's near a light fixture that is adjustable, you can use a grow light bulb - they're inexpensive and will help. There are also very portable and inexpensive light fixtures with grow lights that can be placed in a place that works best for you and the plant.

    Any plant that flowers or bears fruit does better with full sun and regular moisture with good drainage. Roots require amounts of oxygen, water, and nutrients for a healthy plant which will bear healthy fruit.
     
  19. headless chicken

    headless chicken

    Messages:
    866
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    Mom is planning some tomatoes, a couple beef steaks and a roma bush once we've preped the soil. I've already got some herbs going in soon that are currently indoors. I'm planning flat leaf parsley, basil, oregano, thyme, and rosemary.