What your Coffee says about you

Discussion in 'The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)' started by phatch, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I Just Like Food
  2. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    Me?

    If I'm not having just a straight up cup of joe (Starbucks Italian roast please?) with a pinch of stevia and some half and half

    I'm a LATTE

    ... when I read the description, yup, that's me.
     
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Don't you have almond milk?  And honey?  You don't expect me to put cane sugar in my coffee do you?
     
  4. siduri

    siduri

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    I find it interesting that NONE of the above were filter coffee.  What happened to filter coffee?  Plain old american coffee, with a free refill - ah, what a deep nostalgia i have for that, to be able to get a light roast and a long, filter coffee, in quantities that actually will reach my stomach and with milk and sugar on the side, the kind of coffee you can sit with a friend and drink over an actual conversation. 

    Personality: reflective, sociable, somewhat shy, but talkative, intelligent, funny, wonderful... oops, i'm describing me!
     
  5. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I'm strictly Illy espresso.

    In Spain; café cortado.
     
  6. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    siduri, do you mean this type of coffee pot?


    Growing up, this same pot was on our stove all day long, perking away, the house always smelled so good to me.  My Mother was a housewife, or what they call today, a stay at home mom, and her friends would drop by with their kids; we'd all be sent outside to play while the ladies gossiped and drank pots of coffee and ate little tidbits of whatever someone brought over.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  7. siduri

    siduri

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    That's the sort of pot we used to have too, kaneohe, but when i was older.   Percolators make the whole house smell good, and i never had a problem with percolated coffee, though it'snot fashionable now.   But when i was little we used to have this:[​IMG]

    At home i have one of those electric filter things that keeps the coffee warm while i have breakfast.  What i sorely miss, though, is being able to get this sort of coffee outside - places with the filter coffee pot, constantly renewed, so always fresh, and where you can sit and have a coffee with a friend or with your book and actually talk through a conversation over the coffee or read more than two words beforfe the coffee is finished. 

    Espresso is drunk standing and takes one gulp to get it down.  A tablespoon of coffee is hardly worth sitting down for.  And it's too strong for me - to me it feels like draino of the stomach.  Cappuccino is great but still maybe about ten tablespoons of actual liquid.  Hardly enough to have a conversation over. 
     
  8. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    siduri, I've never seen a coffee pot like that before, is this from your Boston days or while you've been in Italia?
     
  9. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Boy for me it is all about coffee. There is nothing better in my opinion than sitting with a friend/s over a great cup of coffee. It is something I take pretty seriously and I am all over the map. During the week when I am on the mad rush to get to work I enjoy the drip coffee. Good old plain american coffee like Siduri pointed out. On the weekend I fired up my Alex Duetto and love making cappucinos and espressos for myself and my wife. I think what my coffee says about me is I love spending time with good friends.


    P.S ChefTalkers are always welcome for a coffee just email me. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
     
  10. siduri

    siduri

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    From my boston days.  I came to italy when i was in my 20s.  That was from childhood.  My mother would have it on the pilot light of the stove all day to keep it warm, and being made of cast aluminum, when i would empty it to wash it there were little piles of crystals of aluminum down at the bottom.  yuck!
     
  11. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Speaking of drip-coffee, the following picture was taken some 10 years ago. I didn't have a digital camera then, so this picture is scanned from my pictures.

    It is taken in the home of a Dominican family, in the neighborhood of Sosua. That's how this lady made us great cup of coffee! The whole ambiance made it an unforgettable experience.

    I do remember my grand-mother and my own mother making coffee exactly the same way; pouring boiling hot water -bit by bit- on coffee in a handmade small bag that was attached to a metal ring which hung in the coffee-pot. The bag was then rinsed and used over and over again!

    The weird thing is that this method is back in many professional coffee-shops over here, many times called... slow coffee!

     
  12. iceman

    iceman

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    I'm in the "Nicko Boat" ... serious and all over the map.   I have and use a percolator like the first pictured example.   I also have and use a standard-basic Mr. Coffee unit.   I don't really think there is a good "home espresso" unit available for less than mid-4 $ digits.   I don't mind paying SB for that.   My go-to drink, when I have the $, is 50/50 Yukon/GoldCoast.   I also like Pike Place when I can get it.   The best however, in my opinion, is real Kona.   I rarely have the $ for that though. 
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2013
  13. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    My family has harvested coffee for decades ( since my great grandparents ), so i love coffee

    My dad now runs the coffee business now. 

    Been drinking coffe since i was a lad ( drinking coffee with milk since i was 6 ). 

    I love drip coffee ( my granmother has made it the same way for years ) , but i love a great cappuccino. 

    The woman at the place i go to , has known me for quite some time , i arrive and she just whips up my cappucino without me even having to ask. 

    Basically drinking coffee with friends is something great , with nice discussions , conversations , and great memories , even better on a cold, breezy , or rainy day. But i still enjoy going to the cafe alone just to read a book. 

    The cappucino is so me ( oblivious <_< ) XD 
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2013
  14. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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    Kaique that is so cool your family actually harvests the beans it seems like an amazing process from what we actually end up with here in the states.
     
  15. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Way too cool pic ChrisBelgium. Sometimes the old ways are the best. That actually is the way I brew my coffee also. I call it my coffee sock. I got it years ago in the Caribbean. Last year when I went to Roatan, I stocked up and bought 5 for about $1.50 a pop. The best part is that the water is hot enough for proper extraction, unlike a lot of coffeemakers on the market today. Being a real coffeehead, I even go so far as roasting my own beans in a pan on the stove top. No technology here. Java on!!! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/drinkbeer.gif  
     
  16. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    I remember as a kid , my grand parents , parents and uncle brought a box load of coffee beans and we roasted them in a very fine fishing net made of steel. 

    I forgot how we ground them , but it ws definetly an experience i havent forgot , i was probably 2 at the time XD. 

    Best part is coffee here in Brazil has great recognition world wide so its a topic im actually fond of ( not that i plan on entering the business anytime soon XD ) 
     
  17. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    I like my coffee that's made using a Bialetti Moka pot with SB's french roast beans.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2013
  18. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Making coffee with a "sock" as you call it, is a true art! The properly ground coffee will first be just a bit moistened, allowing it to swell a bit. Then a small cup of almost boiling water is added; never, ever boiling water, it burns the coffee to death and makes it taste bitter! Then the next cup of hot water is added etc. You need to build enough experience to know how hot the water has to be and how much water you can use to leave enough body in the coffee pot. Nothing smelled better than making coffee using a sock, its aroma fills the room when well made.

    I've seen people add a pinch of cacao powder to the ground coffee! Makes me think when you mention "Java", a fragrant coffee with tiny beans that have a distinct... chocolate flavor!
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2013
  19. durangojo

    durangojo

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    Straight black and strong......


     
  20. french fries

    french fries

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    Here's my technique, called "System D" in France. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif