What to do with left over "juice" from cooking meat?

202
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Joined Dec 19, 2014
Hi :)

Just finished dinner. Heated a skillet, drizzled in a little olive oil, added butter, some garlic cloves, and the lamb, which had S&P applied to both sides. On top of the meat, placed some thyme and rosemary, and drizzled on to that, a little olive oil. Now have this juice left over - almost looks like stock.

DSCF1473.jpg

Can I do anything with that, or should I just toss it. I hate to waste .... :)

Thanks in advance.
 
109
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Joined Apr 11, 2018
Sure, make a pan sauce. Lots of options.

Toss the sprigs. Reduce, taste and adjust seasoning (salt and pepper), finish by whisking in a TB of butter and serve. Or mix in a little heavy cream and reduce slightly more. Or you can thicken it with a little beurre manié. Serve your sauce with your dinner.

Or for later use, separate the fat and juice and use the fat for a later sauté and the juice for a later sauce - after finishing the sauté, sweat some diced shallot, use the juice to deglaze (dissolving the fond/browned bits) then finish as described above, maybe mix in some fresh herbs.
 
3,988
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Joined Dec 18, 2010
I’d pull out the herbs and refrigerate. Tomorrow make gravy and mashed potatoes for lunch.

I’m assuming that you’ve finished your supper.
 
2,238
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Joined Feb 17, 2010
Toss it unless you eat lamb regularly. You should have made a quick pan sauce and served with your dinner.
 
202
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Joined Dec 19, 2014
Good suggestions - thanks. :)

Tho bread is not a good idea - improper food combining :)

So refrigerating 'till the next day is ok?
 
2,848
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
I take it that was sarcasm? :p

I don't think so, this is a notion that has been around for a long time. Actually a small portion of carbs is a good idea with meat proteins, as it ballances intestinal flora, but this can also be accomplished with cabbage and Jerusalem artichoke. Itis the overload situations you are well to avoid though, like your typical spaghetti and meatball dinner. Such a load of carbs actually does not digest easily in the presence of meat. Same goes for your typical oriental rice and meat plate, burger bun and fries, etc. Puts a big load on your pancreas. Eggs also are beast eaten with little carbs, and no meat.
 
2,848
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
On another note, I never toss pan juices. Chicken and turkey suck them up very easily, steak should never have overly much if prepared properly, and of course there is always reduction, which just intensifies the YUM! Crazy, completely crazy to toss that stuff.
 
2,848
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
No harm meant, "Food Combining" was a term from the 50's and promoted as a weight loss diet which was later completely rubbished by testing like most "diets".

Weight loss was never mentioned, though it might have factored into Tony's thinking. But incompletely digested food does lead to serious medical problems, especially with age, and this damage does often also lead to weight gain. With this damage the weight gain is really the least of your problems in possibly most cases.
 
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Joined Dec 19, 2014
So, I wasn't coming at the food combining thing from a diet/lose weight standpoint. Instead, a digestion standpoint.

Actually a small portion of carbs is a good idea with meat proteins, as it ballances intestinal flora... .

Yeah - I have not seen evidence of this. The rest of your post is correct, however :)

Best thing to do is read this:

https://www.amazon dot com/Food-Combining-Made-Herbert-Shelton/dp/1614274533/

Cheers.
 
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Well actually so long as your guts sees the carbs on a regular basis, yes I would say you can keep them "completely" separate. But I don't feel complete extremes are necessary here, unless perhaps you are weak and chronically ill. None of the Leaky-gut diets advocate such extremes, they do of course insist on carb-specific elimination as absolutely essential.

Very important stuff in general though, glad you brought the subject up.
 
2,848
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Joined Nov 15, 2012
Ah yes now I remember why the small addition of carbs to a meat-meal. The meat prevents the carbs from being digested until they reach the large intestine, where the non-ecoli bacteria feed on them and finish the process and balancing act. This is an important mechanism for cutting down on carbs in general, and particularly with diabetics who poorly tolerate significant amounts of complex carbs. Again, Jerusalem artichoke and cabbage can be a substitute.
 

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