What to do with good leftover pieces of meat?

62
15
Joined Jun 27, 2017
I have a lot of leftover meat from flaminyawns and some sauges. They aren't necessarily bad leftovers all this stuff I could eat individually there isn't a lot of fat it's all perfecyl editable. I have them in a ziplock baggy in the fridge, but Idk what to make with them. My first thought was probably to make a stew or something. Not sure what to do with it.
 
442
197
Joined Oct 1, 2006
Think nationality/region when you get stuck.

Flavors/dishes from Asia, Caribbean, Central America, Regional American, European, India, North Africa, etc.

Base it on what else you have on hand and what you like...

What kind of "sauges" do you have?
Bratwurst? Depending on the sausage, a Gumbo might work.

If you actually want ideas, it's helpful to actually identify ingredients you want to use.

Good luck
 
62
15
Joined Jun 27, 2017
Think nationality/region when you get stuck.

Flavors/dishes from Asia, Caribbean, Central America, Regional American, European, India, North Africa, etc.

Base it on what else you have on hand and what you like...

What kind of "sauges" do you have?
Bratwurst? Depending on the sausage, a Gumbo might work.

If you actually want ideas, it's helpful to actually identify ingredients you want to use.

Good luck

I don't want something that has a lot of weird leafs and veggies in it. I've never made a stew or really thought about one. I suppose it's just boiling some random food in water?

I was trying to figure out whether it might be bratwurst or bernaise.

It looks like bratwurst from what I googled. Didn't realize there is different kinds of sausage names, I thought it was just random cuts of meat processed like hamburger meat and squeezed together.
 
442
197
Joined Oct 1, 2006
Oh my, someone else threw random, unlabeled sausage into your shopping cart!

I do understand that you "just like food", now you need to "just like cooking"!

Learning about ingredients is pretty high on the list for starting to learn how to cook.

Opening cans and envelopes of seasoning is a basic start.
 
62
15
Joined Jun 27, 2017
Oh my, someone else threw random, unlabeled sausage into your shopping cart!

I do understand that you "just like food", now you need to "just like cooking"!

Learning about ingredients is pretty high on the list for starting to learn how to cook.

Opening cans and envelopes of seasoning is a basic start.

It's a bag of leftover meat my mom cooked and I asked if I wanted it. I didn't ask her what the sausage was because I actually thought it was potatoes. I know for sure the steak is flaminyawn because it's obvious.
 
2,619
230
Joined Mar 21, 2008
Chop the meat(it can be both mixed together) in 1/4 inch pieces. Chop a small onion the same size, cube up a potato about the same size. Cook the onion and potato in some bacon fat, when tender add the chooped meats and brown. Salt and pepper to taste as cooking. You now have a simple hash that will be tasty! Can add some cooked cubed carrot too to this.

One of my favorite ways to use up leftover roast beef with roasted potatoes and carrots!
 
2,394
407
Joined Oct 9, 2008
And it doesn't have to be bacon fat for the hash: you can use vegetable oil just as well.

There is a whole vast range of foods you can make from leftovers. The French call it "les restes," and once upon a time Americans called it being thrifty. Alas, we've lost much of that tradition.

So:

First: sweat diced onions in some kind of fat (oil, dripping, butter), possibly with diced celery, carrot, green pepper. Stir in the chopped meat. You now have an excellent base for all kinds of things. Such as:

1. Add water and/or stock, cooked (canned and rinsed is fine) beans, and a handful of small dry pasta (elbows, orzo, whatever). Simmer fast until the pasta is soft. Adjust salt and pepper. To serve, grate fresh Parmesan over the top and pour on a little dab of extra virgin olive oil. Simple pasta e fagioli, or "pasta fazool."

2. Add bechamel sauce (butter-flour roux used to thicken milk), stir in grated gruyere or similar hard Swiss-type cheese until just melted, ladle into crepes, bake. One of the most classic French uses for les restes.

3. Stir in long-grain rice, fresh garlic, a lot of Cajun seasoning, and a generous helping of Tabasco (or Frank's, etc.). Stir-fry for a few minutes until the rice is thoroughly coated with the oils. Add the normal amount of water (or stock) for the amount of rice added (see package directions), stir well, cover tightly, and simmer until rice is cooked through. Serve with more hot sauce. Simple Jambalaya.

4. Add strong stock, fresh garlic, a lot of Cajun seasoning, and bring to a strong simmer. In a separate (NOT nonstick) saucepan or skillet, heat 1/4-1/2 cup neutral vegetable oil (peanut, corn, Canola, etc.) until just smoking. Add the same quantity of flour and whisk rapidly and continuously until the roux is reddish-peanut butter-colored. Remove from heat and stir the roux into the soup mixture, stirring or whisking vigorously as you go, not stopping stirring until you're sure there are no lumps. Allow to cook a good hour over a medium simmer. Simple gumbo.

Do you begin to see how this works?

Hope it helps.
 
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