What thickening agent is used for lobster salad and such

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by rick alan, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I have noticed that lobster rolls from local supermarkets have no runniness whatever to them, like they added starch or something to the mayo.  What might that substance be, or what is best used here?

    Rick
     
  2. j20832

    j20832

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    They are probably just using "heavy duty" mayo.  It is thicker than regular mayo.
     
  3. 23years

    23years

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    Try a touch of cream cheese.
     
  4. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Probably xanthan gum.
     
     
  5. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Creamcheese might mask the delicate flavor of lobster, so far it looks like heavy mayo (which I understand just contains more oil), or xgum. 

    How much of the latter would you use Cheflayne, and could it be mixed into mayo or do we need to start from scratch?

    Rick
     
  6. j20832

    j20832

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    According to Kraft foods, the HD mayo is higher in oil and egg content.
     
  7. eastshores

    eastshores

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    Could it be that they press the meat to remove excess moisture? The juices could be saved for a lobster stock.
     
  8. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Generally about 1/8 teaspoon per cup is a good starting point. Dust it through a sieve onto the surface of the mayo and then whisk it in.
     
  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Thanks for all the responses, here are my thoughts:

    Eshores, you really can't press freshly poached lobster meat, but you will see that done with frozen and packaged stuff.

    I think the xgum makes most sense and will order some online most likely as I don't think I'll find it locally.

    I know now that you can't put anything on the meat like sugar, lemon, lemon zest etc will have to go into the mayo

    I also know now that poaching isn't done at 200F, I get much better results starting at 175 and bringing that in steps over 20 min. down to 140.  I'm also going to try finishing the poach in butter (unsalted). 

    We still have a month or so more for hard shell lobsters here in the Northeast, and they're selling relatively cheap at $6/pound, so I hope to have this perfected within that time and let folks know what I finally come up with for the perfect lobster roll.

    Rick
     
  10. brandon odell

    brandon odell

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    I've never used a thickener for lobster salad. The only time I've seen a problem with it being runny is either when the lobster hasn't been drained well enough or there is too much mayo used. The second is the most common problem I've seen with lobster salad in general. I would think the right amount of heavy duty mayo would work fine.
     
  11. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Thickening Agent???   If you mean what is the binder, it is a good quality Mayo like Hellman's or Best Foods  (which are the same)
     
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Brandon,   I use Helmans (which is not as good as the old Helmans made with transfats, but at least it doesn't have the transfats anymore), it just doesn't have anywhere near the same effect as whatever they are using in the supermarkets around here, and that produces a texture thing I somehow just find neat.  Heavy mayo might do the trick for me and I'm going to try may hand at making it, I really should be making my own mayo anyway.  But I like the idea of the xgum as that is not likely to break down at all if I understand it's action correctly. 

    Maybe someone around here has experience with both heavy mayo and xgum and can give a comparison, that might settle it.

    Rick
     
  13. chef-josh

    chef-josh

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    We use something called "thick and easy" think it's from the UK, when making seafood cocktails or mayo based canape's you just whisk it in, no taste difference, couldn't tell you what's in though?
     
  14. chefhow

    chefhow

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    Mayo is not allowed to Xanthan gum, if it does it needs to be called Salad Spread or its a light/low fat Mayo.
     
  15. thegrumpycook

    thegrumpycook

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    maltodextrin could could be used. it is a fat cuagulater. I use it to make powdered peanut butter.
     
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Thick and Easy is a maltodextrin/modified starch.  I think this is also the "modified starch" you see used to make frying batters stick better, interesting.  Available on Amazon.

    Rick